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The word "insect" comes from the Latin word insectum, meaning "with a notched or divided body", or literally "cut into", from the neuter singular past participle of insectare, "to cut into, to cut up", from in- "into" and secare "to cut";[9] because insects appear "cut into" three sections. Pliny the Elder introduced the Latin designation as a loan-translation of the Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life, also in reference to their "notched" bodies. "Insect" first appears documented in English in 1601 in Holland's translation of Pliny. Translations of Aristotle's term also form the usual word for "insect" in Welsh (trychfil, from trychu "to cut" and mil, "animal"), Serbo-Croatian (zareznik, from rezati, "to cut"), Russian (насекомое nasekomoje, from seč'/-sekat', "to cut"), etc.[9]
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Insect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
ation9.2 Pollination9.3 Parasitism9.4 Other biological interactions 10 Relationship to humans 10.1 As pests10.2 In beneficial roles10.3 In research10.4 As food10.5 In culture 11 See also12 Notes13 References14 External links Etymology[edit] <span>The word "insect" comes from the Latin word insectum, meaning "with a notched or divided body", or literally "cut into", from the neuter singular past participle of insectare, "to cut into, to cut up", from in- "into" and secare "to cut";[9] because insects appear "cut into" three sections. Pliny the Elder introduced the Latin designation as a loan-translation of the Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life, also in reference to their "notched" bodies. "Insect" first appears documented in English in 1601 in Holland's translation of Pliny. Translations of Aristotle's term also form the usual word for "insect" in Welsh (trychfil, from trychu "to cut" and mil, "animal"), Serbo-Croatian (zareznik, from rezati, "to cut"), Russian (насекомое nasekomoje, from seč'/-sekat', "to cut"), etc.[9] Phylogeny and evolution[edit] Evolution has produced astonishing variety in insects. Pictured are some of the possible shapes of antennae. Main article: Evolution of insects The ev




Flashcard 149621440

Question
The word "insect" comes from the .....
Answer
Latin word insectum,

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The word "insect" comes from the Latin word insectum, meaning "with a notched or divided body", or literally "cut into", from the neuter singular past participle of insectare, "to cut into, to cut up", from in-

Original toplevel document

Insect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
ation9.2 Pollination9.3 Parasitism9.4 Other biological interactions 10 Relationship to humans 10.1 As pests10.2 In beneficial roles10.3 In research10.4 As food10.5 In culture 11 See also12 Notes13 References14 External links Etymology[edit] <span>The word "insect" comes from the Latin word insectum, meaning "with a notched or divided body", or literally "cut into", from the neuter singular past participle of insectare, "to cut into, to cut up", from in- "into" and secare "to cut";[9] because insects appear "cut into" three sections. Pliny the Elder introduced the Latin designation as a loan-translation of the Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life, also in reference to their "notched" bodies. "Insect" first appears documented in English in 1601 in Holland's translation of Pliny. Translations of Aristotle's term also form the usual word for "insect" in Welsh (trychfil, from trychu "to cut" and mil, "animal"), Serbo-Croatian (zareznik, from rezati, "to cut"), Russian (насекомое nasekomoje, from seč'/-sekat', "to cut"), etc.[9] Phylogeny and evolution[edit] Evolution has produced astonishing variety in insects. Pictured are some of the possible shapes of antennae. Main article: Evolution of insects The ev







loan-translation of the Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life
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Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
ar past participle of insectare, "to cut into, to cut up", from in- "into" and secare "to cut";[9] because insects appear "cut into" three sections. Pliny the Elder introduced the Latin designation as a <span>loan-translation of the Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life, also in reference to their "notched" bodies. "Insect" first appears documented in English in 1601 in Holland's translation of Pliny. Translations of Aristotle's ter

Original toplevel document

Insect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
ation9.2 Pollination9.3 Parasitism9.4 Other biological interactions 10 Relationship to humans 10.1 As pests10.2 In beneficial roles10.3 In research10.4 As food10.5 In culture 11 See also12 Notes13 References14 External links Etymology[edit] <span>The word "insect" comes from the Latin word insectum, meaning "with a notched or divided body", or literally "cut into", from the neuter singular past participle of insectare, "to cut into, to cut up", from in- "into" and secare "to cut";[9] because insects appear "cut into" three sections. Pliny the Elder introduced the Latin designation as a loan-translation of the Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life, also in reference to their "notched" bodies. "Insect" first appears documented in English in 1601 in Holland's translation of Pliny. Translations of Aristotle's term also form the usual word for "insect" in Welsh (trychfil, from trychu "to cut" and mil, "animal"), Serbo-Croatian (zareznik, from rezati, "to cut"), Russian (насекомое nasekomoje, from seč'/-sekat', "to cut"), etc.[9] Phylogeny and evolution[edit] Evolution has produced astonishing variety in insects. Pictured are some of the possible shapes of antennae. Main article: Evolution of insects The ev