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on 14-Sep-2015 (Mon)

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Flashcard 150913576

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
beer tokens
Answer
money


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Money Slang - English Slang
d) Another slang term with origins in the 1800s when the coins were actually solid silver, from the practice of testing authenticity by biting and bending the coin, which would being made of near-pure silver have been softer than the fakes. <span>beer tokens = money. Usually now meaning one pound coins. From the late 20th century. Alternatively beer vouchers, which commonly meant pound notes, prior to their withdrawal. beehive = five poun







Flashcard 150913580

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
bob
Answer
shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. no plural


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Money Slang - English Slang
size of the £1,000 chip. It would seem that the 'biscuit' slang term is still evolving and might mean different things (£100 or £1,000) to different people. I can find no other references to meanings or origins for the money term 'biscuit'. <span>bob = shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. Historically bob was slang for a British shilling (Twelve old pence, pre-decimalisation - and







Flashcard 150913593

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
brass
Answer
money


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Money Slang - English Slang
lemonade... it has died out nowadays - I was brought up in the 50s and 60s and it was an everyday word around my area back then. As kids growing up we always asked for a glass of spruce. It was quite an accepted name for lemonade..." <span>brass = money. From the 16th century, and a popular expression the north of England, e.g., 'where there's muck there's brass' which incidentally alluded to certain trades involving scrap, mess







Flashcard 150913597

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
bread (bread and honey)
Answer
money. From cockney rhyming slang, bread and honey = money


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Money Slang - English Slang
here's brass' expression helped maintain and spread the populairity iof the 'brass' money slang, rather than cause it. Brass originated as slang for money by association to the colour of gold coins, and the value of brass as a scrap metal. <span>bread (bread and honey) = money. From cockney rhyming slang, bread and honey = money, and which gave rise to the secondary rhyming slang 'poppy', from poppy red = bread. Bread also has associations with money,







Flashcard 150913601

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
chip
Answer
a shilling (1/-) and earlier, mid-late 1800s a pound or a sovereign. According to Cassells chip meaning a shilling is from horse-racing and betting.


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Money Slang - English Slang
five year prison term. Caser was slang also for a US dollar coin, and the US/Autralian slang logically transferred to English, either or all because of the reference to silver coin, dollar slang for a crown, or the comparable value, as was. <span>chip = a shilling (1/-) and earlier, mid-late 1800s a pound or a sovereign. According to Cassells chip meaning a shilling is from horse-racing and betting. Chip was also slang for an Indian r







Flashcard 150913605

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
coppers
Answer
pre-decimal farthings, ha'pennies and pennies, and to a lesser extent 1p and 2p coins since decimalisation, and also meaning a very small amount of money.


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Money Slang - English Slang
va = fiver); fifteen pounds is three-times five pounds (3x£5=£15); 'Three Times a Lady' is a song recorded by the group The Commodores; and there you have it: Three Times a Lady = fifteen pounds = a commodore. (Thanks Simon Ladd, Jun 2007) <span>coppers = pre-decimal farthings, ha'pennies and pennies, and to a lesser extent 1p and 2p coins since decimalisation, and also meaning a very small amount of money. Coppers was very popular slan







Flashcard 150913609

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
dosh
Answer
slang for a reasonable amount of spending money, for instance enough for a 'night-out'.


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Money Slang - English Slang
standard coinage in that region of what would now be Germany. All later generic versions of the coins were called 'Thalers'. An 'oxford' was cockney rhyming slang for five shillings (5/-) based on the dollar rhyming slang: 'oxford scholar'. <span>dosh = slang for a reasonable amount of spending money, for instance enough for a 'night-out'. Almost certainly and logically derived from the slang 'doss-house', meaning a very cheap hostel







Flashcard 150913613

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
fiver
Answer
five pounds (£5), from the mid-1800s. More rarely from the early-mid 1900s fiver could also mean five thousand pounds, but arguably it remains today the most widely used slang term for five pounds.


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Money Slang - English Slang
fourth, corresponding to Old Frisian fiardeng, meaning a quarter of a mark, and similar Germanic words meaning four and fourth. The modern form of farthing was first recorded in English around 1280 when it altered from ferthing to farthing. <span>fiver = five pounds (£5), from the mid-1800s. More rarely from the early-mid 1900s fiver could also mean five thousand pounds, but arguably it remains today the most widely used slang term for







Flashcard 150913617

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
grand
Answer
a thousand pounds (£1,000 or $1,000) Not pluralised in full form.


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Money Slang - English Slang
ralize is just about understandable, if somewhat tenuous, and in the absence of other explanation is the only known possible derivation of this odd slang. gen net/net gen = ten shillings (1/-), backslang from the 1800s (from 'ten gen'). <span>grand = a thousand pounds (£1,000 or $1,000) Not pluralised in full form. Shortened to 'G' (usually plural form also) or less commonly 'G's'. Originated in the USA in the 1920s, logically an a







Flashcard 150913621

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
k/K
Answer
a thousand (£1,000 or $1,000). From the 1960s, becoming widely used in the 1970s. Plural uses singular form. 'K' has now mainly replaced 'G' in common speech and especially among middle and professional classes. While some etymology sources suggest that 'k' (obviously pronounced 'kay') is from business-speak and underworld language derived from the K abbreviation of kilograms, kilometres, I am inclined to prefer the derivation (suggested to me by Terry Davies) that K instead originates from computer-speak in the early 1970s, from the abbreviation of kilobytes.


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Money Slang - English Slang
es in the United Kingdom had ceased there was a tendency for the coins to be hoarded and comparatively few were ever returned to the Royal Mint. The coin was not formally demonetised until 31 August 1971 at the time of decimalisation." <span>k/K = a thousand (£1,000 or $1,000). From the 1960s, becoming widely used in the 1970s. Plural uses singular form. 'K' has now mainly replaced 'G' in common speech and especially among middl







Flashcard 150913625

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
quid
Answer
one pound (£1) or a number of pounds sterling. Plural uses singular form, eg., 'Fifteen quid is all I want for it..', or 'I won five hundred quid on the horses yesterday..'.


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Money Slang - English Slang
yming slang, from 'poppy red' = bread, in turn from 'bread and honey' = money. quarter = five shillings (5/-) from the 1800s, meaning a quarter of a pound. More recently (1900s) the slang 'a quarter' has transfered to twenty-five pounds. <span>quid = one pound (£1) or a number of pounds sterling. Plural uses singular form, eg., 'Fifteen quid is all I want for it..', or 'I won five hundred quid on the horses yesterday..'. The slang







Flashcard 150913629

Tags
#describe-meaning #english #slang
Question
wonga
Answer
money


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Money Slang - English Slang
sed by comedian Harry Enfield. wedge = nowadays 'a wedge' a pay-packet amount of money, although the expression is apparently from a very long time ago when coins were actually cut into wedge-shaped pieces to create smaller money units. <span>wonga = money. Less common variations on the same theme: wamba, wanga, or womba. Modern London slang. Probably from Romany gypsy 'wanga' meaning coal. The large Australian 'wonga' pigeon is al