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Article 150920511

Musability

Musability By Stephen Downes May 5, 2012 This article published as ‘Musability’ in Prethinking Work: Insights on the Future of Work (ISBN 978-3-643-90240-5), pp. 67-69. Lit Verlag (Dec 16 2012). Sabina Jeschke, Frank Hees, Anja Richert, Sven Trantow, eds. This morning I read a short item from Mashable describing some predictions being made for the next five years by IBM. Among more workaday predictions we’ve heard elsewhere – that biometrics will become mainstream, for example, or that mobile computing will end the digital divide – is a prediction that demands more attention: that mind reading will become a practical technology. This seems more the stuff of science fiction than it does a practical reflection on the future of work. However, the technology itself is not science fiction. The technology already exists to allow a person to control the movement of a cube on the screen through the exercise of thought alone. As we design input devices of greater and greater sensitivity, phenomena that o



Flashcard 150920516

Question
Musability
By Stephen Downes
May 5, 2012
This article published as ‘Musability’ in Prethinking Work: Insights on the Future of
Work (ISBN 978-3-643-90240-5), pp. 67-69. Lit Verlag (Dec 16 2012). Sabina
Jeschke, Frank Hees, Anja Richert, Sven Trantow, eds.
This morning I read a short item from Mashable describing some predictions being made for the
next five years by IBM. Among more workaday predictions we’ve heard elsewhere – that
[...] will become mainstream, for example, or that mobile computing will end the digital
divide – is a prediction that demands more attention: that mind reading will become a practical
technology.
This seems more the stuff of science fiction than it does a practical reflection on the future of
work. However, the technology itself is not science fiction. The technology already exists to
allow a person to control the movement of a cube on the screen through the exercise of thought
alone. As we design input devices of greater and greater sensitivity, phenomena that once
appeared to us to be only mental – our thoughts and dreams, for example – will begin to appear
as physical manifestations.
Musing (‘mental using’) will become commonplace. Musability will become an important
science, as these interfaces will need to be able to support action without distracting us – if you
think it’s dangerous to drive while talking on a mobile phone, imagine how dangerous it will be
to drive while interfacing with a poorly designed muser agent.
Most likely we will first experience these interfaces as games. We will play at rotating the cube
or dropping the objects into the correct containers all the while adapting to new skills our
children (or their children) will take for granted. These mental environments will become as real
to us – and as important a part of our every day lives – as places like Facebook and Twitter and
World of Warcraft are today. It will, indeed, be difficult to imagine what the world was like
before people were connected mentally.
It is tempting at first to see such devices as replacing our current control panels and input
screens. And there is an advantage to be found in mental control of physical devices. For
example, we can - with training - speed our reaction times. Or we can, through visualization,
execute movements that might be difficult physically, such as balancing an object or reproducing
an image. Mental controls also reduce the distraction physical movements create while driving or
executing some other motor operation.
Musing, however, has the potential to have a much wider impact. The possibility of subsonic
broadcast through, say, a tiny transmitter implanted in our ears, or through optical displays
embedded in a contact lens, enables two-way communication. A person could interact with
another person or device in an entirely inconspicuous manner. The clerk at the counter who
smiles and welcomes you by name may be communicating with a complex computer program
that tells her everything she needs to know in the time it takes the two of you to shake hands.
Or you may be communicating with each other subvocally. When you walk up to the counter
your request has been prepared by your own computer system and is transmitted to her with a
thought. She receives a short mental message acknowledging receipt and nods to you in
response, while subsonically expressing her thanks for your patronage. Meanwhile your status –
and your thoughts – are relayed instantly to other members of your workgroup, who receive them
as updates as they participate in meetings or tasks of their own.
It seems like a small thing, internal communication instead of external. But as our machines
become more able to respond to our thoughts, these communications will enabl...
Answer
biometrics

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill
Musability
ke, Frank Hees, Anja Richert, Sven Trantow, eds. This morning I read a short item from Mashable describing some predictions being made for the next five years by IBM. Among more workaday predictions we’ve heard elsewhere – that <span>biometrics will become mainstream, for example, or that mobile computing will end the digital divide – is a prediction that demands more attention: that mind reading will become a practical&#1







Flashcard 150920522

Question
Musability
By Stephen Downes
May 5, 2012
This article published as ‘Musability’ in Prethinking Work: Insights on the Future of
Work (ISBN 978-3-643-90240-5), pp. 67-69. Lit Verlag (Dec 16 2012). Sabina
Jeschke, Frank Hees, Anja Richert, Sven Trantow, eds.
This morning I read a short item from Mashable describing some predictions being made for the
next five years by IBM. Among more workaday predictions we’ve heard elsewhere – that
biometrics will become mainstream, for example, or that [...] will end the digital
divide – is a prediction that demands more attention: that mind reading will become a practical
technology.
This seems more the stuff of science fiction than it does a practical reflection on the future of
work. However, the technology itself is not science fiction. The technology already exists to
allow a person to control the movement of a cube on the screen through the exercise of thought
alone. As we design input devices of greater and greater sensitivity, phenomena that once
appeared to us to be only mental – our thoughts and dreams, for example – will begin to appear
as physical manifestations.
Musing (‘mental using’) will become commonplace. Musability will become an important
science, as these interfaces will need to be able to support action without distracting us – if you
think it’s dangerous to drive while talking on a mobile phone, imagine how dangerous it will be
to drive while interfacing with a poorly designed muser agent.
Most likely we will first experience these interfaces as games. We will play at rotating the cube
or dropping the objects into the correct containers all the while adapting to new skills our
children (or their children) will take for granted. These mental environments will become as real
to us – and as important a part of our every day lives – as places like Facebook and Twitter and
World of Warcraft are today. It will, indeed, be difficult to imagine what the world was like
before people were connected mentally.
It is tempting at first to see such devices as replacing our current control panels and input
screens. And there is an advantage to be found in mental control of physical devices. For
example, we can - with training - speed our reaction times. Or we can, through visualization,
execute movements that might be difficult physically, such as balancing an object or reproducing
an image. Mental controls also reduce the distraction physical movements create while driving or
executing some other motor operation.
Musing, however, has the potential to have a much wider impact. The possibility of subsonic
broadcast through, say, a tiny transmitter implanted in our ears, or through optical displays
embedded in a contact lens, enables two-way communication. A person could interact with
another person or device in an entirely inconspicuous manner. The clerk at the counter who
smiles and welcomes you by name may be communicating with a complex computer program
that tells her everything she needs to know in the time it takes the two of you to shake hands.
Or you may be communicating with each other subvocally. When you walk up to the counter
your request has been prepared by your own computer system and is transmitted to her with a
thought. She receives a short mental message acknowledging receipt and nods to you in
response, while subsonically expressing her thanks for your patronage. Meanwhile your status –
and your thoughts – are relayed instantly to other members of your workgroup, who receive them
as updates as they participate in meetings or tasks of their own.
It seems like a small thing, internal communication instead of external. But as our machines
become more able to respond to our thoughts, these communications will enable comp...
Answer
mobile computing

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill
Musability
is morning I read a short item from Mashable describing some predictions being made for the next five years by IBM. Among more workaday predictions we’ve heard elsewhere – that biometrics will become mainstream, for example, or that <span>mobile computing will end the digital divide – is a prediction that demands more attention: that mind reading will become a practical technology. This seems more the stuff of science ficti