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on 17-Jul-2016 (Sun)

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Flashcard 1366027275532

Tags
#constitution #law #public
Question
A state's constitution should define [...] and place legitimate limitations on the power of government.
Answer
the parameters of state power


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A state's constitution should define the parameters of state power and place legitimate limitations on the power of government.

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Flashcard 1366028848396

Tags
#constitution #law #public
Question
A state's constitution should define the parameters of state power and place [...].
Answer
legitimate limitations on the power of government


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A state's constitution should define the parameters of state power and place legitimate limitations on the power of government.

Original toplevel document (pdf)

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Flashcard 1366032780556

Tags
#constitution #law #public
Question
[...] v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2004] UKHL 56 (also known as the ‘Belmarsh case’). This case concerned the detention of a number of suspected terrorists held in Belmarsh Prison under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001. Section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001permitted detention of suspected international terrorists without charge or trial. Such detention was presumed incompatible with Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights, and so the UK initially lodged a derogation from this Article (through the Human Rights Act 1998 (Designated Derogation) Order 2001) in order to allow it to pass the above measure in the first place. However, the House of Lords ruled that the derogation did not satisfy the criteria required: as a result, they quashed the derogation order which then allowed them to issue a declaration of incompatibility in respect of section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001.
Answer
A and Others


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A and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2004] UKHL 56 (also known as the ‘Belmarsh case’). This case concerned the detention of a number of suspected terrorists held in Belmarsh

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Flashcard 1366034353420

Tags
#constitution #law #public
Question
A and Others v [...] [2004] UKHL 56 (also known as the ‘Belmarsh case’). This case concerned the detention of a number of suspected terrorists held in Belmarsh Prison under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001. Section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001permitted detention of suspected international terrorists without charge or trial. Such detention was presumed incompatible with Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights, and so the UK initially lodged a derogation from this Article (through the Human Rights Act 1998 (Designated Derogation) Order 2001) in order to allow it to pass the above measure in the first place. However, the House of Lords ruled that the derogation did not satisfy the criteria required: as a result, they quashed the derogation order which then allowed them to issue a declaration of incompatibility in respect of section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001.
Answer
Secretary of State for the Home Department


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A and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2004] UKHL 56 (also known as the ‘Belmarsh case’). This case concerned the detention of a number of suspected terrorists held in Belmarsh Prison under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and

Original toplevel document (pdf)

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Flashcard 1366035926284

Tags
#constitution #law #public
Question
[Case] [2004] UKHL 56 (also known as the ‘Belmarsh case’). This case concerned the detention of a number of suspected terrorists held in Belmarsh Prison under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001. Section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001permitted detention of suspected international terrorists without charge or trial. Such detention was presumed incompatible with Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights, and so the UK initially lodged a derogation from this Article (through the Human Rights Act 1998 (Designated Derogation) Order 2001) in order to allow it to pass the above measure in the first place. However, the House of Lords ruled that the derogation did not satisfy the criteria required: as a result, they quashed the derogation order which then allowed them to issue a declaration of incompatibility in respect of section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001.
Answer
A and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department


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A and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2004] UKHL 56 (also known as the ‘Belmarsh case’). This case concerned the detention of a number of suspected terrorists held in Belmarsh Prison under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and

Original toplevel document (pdf)

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Flashcard 1366038285580

Tags
#constitution #law #public
Question
A and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department (also known as the ‘Belmarsh case’)
Answer
This case concerned the detention of a number of suspected terrorists held in Belmarsh Prison under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001. Section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001permitted detention of suspected international terrorists without charge or trial. Such detention was presumed incompatible with Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights, and so the UK initially lodged a derogation from this Article (through the Human Rights Act 1998 (Designated Derogation) Order 2001) in order to allow it to pass the above measure in the first place. However, the House of Lords ruled that the derogation did not satisfy the criteria required: as a result, they quashed the derogation order which then allowed them to issue a declaration of incompatibility in respect of section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001.


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A and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2004] UKHL 56 (also known as the ‘Belmarsh case’). This case concerned the detention of a number of suspected terrorists held in Belmarsh Prison under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001. Section 23 of the Anti-Terrorism

Original toplevel document (pdf)

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