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on 21-Sep-2016 (Wed)

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The Vita Antonii he reads as scripture - he lives with - he writes his own life on the basis of
#has-images
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PLOTINUS - does he reference explicitly? If not from where?A-
Epekeina tes ousias is the Platonic term for the beyond of being; Derrida has often used this concept as a stepping- stone in his deconstructions. Signified and signifier have been explained
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#book #marked
The theory of a mental scribe and a mental painter seems to be purported to explain these two aspects. When an experience of a bodily pleasure is stored in the book of the soul, it contains a proposition which states that a certain activity was pleasant and, furthermore, contains the corresponding imagining of one- self as enjoying it. As far as the imagination actualizes the perceptual content of the experience, it is possible to remember the feeling quality of the experience by ‘feeling’ it in the same way as one can remember a colour by ‘seeing’ it in the soul. A vivid mental recollection of a past experience of pleasure or pain may affect the s
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#marked #plotinuspaper
n his v iew it is usually better to act on rational desire than to follow non-reasoned suggestions. However, one can see from the second book of the Rhetoric that emotional responses and feelings were also regarded as sources of information for rational decision making and the well-educated emotions as supporting motivation for virtuous action. (For the ambivalent nature of emotions, see Rhet. 1.10, 1369a18–24.)
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#physiogomy
For Aristotle’s sketchy remarks on the mechanism of heating and chilling and the movements of the innate pneuma (sumphuton pneuma), see Tracy (1969), 354–9, and the more detailed accounts in Nussbaum (1978), 143–64, and G. Freudenthal, Aristotle’s Theory of Material Substance, Heat and Pneuma, Form and Soul (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995), 134–7
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