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A frame mean a graphical window or terminal screen occupied by Emacs.

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GNU Emacs Manual
, Previous: Intro, Up: Top 1 The Organization of the Screen On a graphical display, such as on GNU/Linux using the X Window System, Emacs occupies a graphical window. On a text terminal, Emacs occupies the entire terminal screen. <span>We will use the term frame to mean a graphical window or terminal screen occupied by Emacs. Emacs behaves very similarly on both kinds of frames. It normally starts out with just one frame, but you can create additional frames if you wish (see Frames). Each frame consis




Flashcard 1792063704332

Question
A [...] mean a graphical window or terminal screen occupied by Emacs.
Answer
frame


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A frame mean a graphical window or terminal screen occupied by Emacs.

Original toplevel document

GNU Emacs Manual
, Previous: Intro, Up: Top 1 The Organization of the Screen On a graphical display, such as on GNU/Linux using the X Window System, Emacs occupies a graphical window. On a text terminal, Emacs occupies the entire terminal screen. <span>We will use the term frame to mean a graphical window or terminal screen occupied by Emacs. Emacs behaves very similarly on both kinds of frames. It normally starts out with just one frame, but you can create additional frames if you wish (see Frames). Each frame consis







Flashcard 1792066063628

Question
A frame mean a [...].
Answer
graphical window or terminal screen occupied by Emacs


statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

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Open it
A frame mean a graphical window or terminal screen occupied by Emacs.

Original toplevel document

GNU Emacs Manual
, Previous: Intro, Up: Top 1 The Organization of the Screen On a graphical display, such as on GNU/Linux using the X Window System, Emacs occupies a graphical window. On a text terminal, Emacs occupies the entire terminal screen. <span>We will use the term frame to mean a graphical window or terminal screen occupied by Emacs. Emacs behaves very similarly on both kinds of frames. It normally starts out with just one frame, but you can create additional frames if you wish (see Frames). Each frame consis







BFS and its application in finding connected components of graphs were invented in 1945 by Konrad Zuse and Michael Burke, in their (rejected) Ph.D. thesis on the Plankalkül programming language, but this was not published until 1972.[2] It was reinvented in 1959 by Edward F. Moore, who used it to find the shortest path out of a maze,[3][4] and later developed by C. Y. Lee into a wire routing algorithm (published 1961).[5]

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Breadth-first search - Wikipedia
sing or searching tree or graph data structures. It starts at the tree root (or some arbitrary node of a graph, sometimes referred to as a 'search key' [1] ) and explores the neighbor nodes first, before moving to the next level neighbours. <span>BFS and its application in finding connected components of graphs were invented in 1945 by Konrad Zuse and Michael Burke, in their (rejected) Ph.D. thesis on the Plankalkül programming language, but this was not published until 1972. [2] It was reinvented in 1959 by Edward F. Moore, who used it to find the shortest path out of a maze, [3] [4] and later developed by C. Y. Lee into a wire routing algorithm (published 1961). [5] Contents 1 Pseudocode 1.1 More details 1.2 Example 2 Analysis 2.1 Time and space complexity 2.2 Completeness 3 BFS ordering 4 Applications 5 See also 6 References 7 Ext




Flashcard 1792076025100

Question
BFS and its application in finding connected components of graphs were invented in [...] by Konrad Zuse and Michael Burke, in their (rejected) Ph.D. thesis on the Plankalkül programming language, but this was not published until 1972.[2] It was reinvented in 1959 by Edward F. Moore, who used it to find the shortest path out of a maze,[3][4] and later developed by C. Y. Lee into a wire routing algorithm (published 1961).[5]
Answer
1945


statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
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BFS and its application in finding connected components of graphs were invented in 1945 by Konrad Zuse and Michael Burke, in their (rejected) Ph.D. thesis on the Plankalkül programming language, but this was not published until 1972. [2] It was reinvented in 1959 by Edwar

Original toplevel document

Breadth-first search - Wikipedia
sing or searching tree or graph data structures. It starts at the tree root (or some arbitrary node of a graph, sometimes referred to as a 'search key' [1] ) and explores the neighbor nodes first, before moving to the next level neighbours. <span>BFS and its application in finding connected components of graphs were invented in 1945 by Konrad Zuse and Michael Burke, in their (rejected) Ph.D. thesis on the Plankalkül programming language, but this was not published until 1972. [2] It was reinvented in 1959 by Edward F. Moore, who used it to find the shortest path out of a maze, [3] [4] and later developed by C. Y. Lee into a wire routing algorithm (published 1961). [5] Contents 1 Pseudocode 1.1 More details 1.2 Example 2 Analysis 2.1 Time and space complexity 2.2 Completeness 3 BFS ordering 4 Applications 5 See also 6 References 7 Ext