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#French
Accents have to be placed in their proper places, otherwise it is considered as a spelling mistake.
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x: maïs. The "cédille" ¸ (cedilla) is found only on the letter C. It changes a hard C sound (like K) into a soft C sound (like S), e.g., garçon. It never appears in front of E or I, as C always sounds like an S in front of them. <span>Accents have to be placed in their proper places, otherwise it is considered as a spelling mistake. (Exception: capital letters are often left unaccented) Give Lingot11 82 4 years ago [imagelink] Comment posted! Post Cancel 34 Comments [imagelink] E.T.s_Son 11 11 9 8 7 6 6




Flashcard 1800138525964

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Accents have to be placed in their proper places, otherwise it is considered as a [...].
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spelling mistake

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Accents have to be placed in their proper places, otherwise it is considered as a spelling mistake.

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Duolingo: Learn Spanish, French and other languages for free
x: maïs. The "cédille" ¸ (cedilla) is found only on the letter C. It changes a hard C sound (like K) into a soft C sound (like S), e.g., garçon. It never appears in front of E or I, as C always sounds like an S in front of them. <span>Accents have to be placed in their proper places, otherwise it is considered as a spelling mistake. (Exception: capital letters are often left unaccented) Give Lingot11 82 4 years ago [imagelink] Comment posted! Post Cancel 34 Comments [imagelink] E.T.s_Son 11 11 9 8 7 6 6







#french
Standard French contrasts up to 13 oral vowels and up to 4 nasal vowels.
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French phonology - Wikipedia
[imagelink] Vowels of Parisian French, from Collins & Mees (2013:225–226). Many speakers merge /œ̃/ with /ɛ̃/ and /a/ with /ɑ/. In the latter case, the outcome is an open central [ä] between the two (not shown on the chart). <span>Standard French contrasts up to 13 oral vowels and up to 4 nasal vowels. The schwa (in the center of the diagram next to this paragraph) is not necessarily a distinctive sound. Even though it often merges with one of the mid front rounded vowels, its pattern




#french
Many speakers merge /œ̃/ with /ɛ̃/ and /a/ with /ɑ/ .
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French phonology - Wikipedia
dø ʒuʁ/ → [dø.ʒuʁ] 'two days'), but in deux ans /døz‿ɑ̃/ (→ [dø.zɑ̃] 'two years'), the linking or liaison consonant /z/ is pronounced. Vowels[edit source] [imagelink] Vowels of Parisian French, from Collins & Mees (2013:225–226). <span>Many speakers merge /œ̃/ with /ɛ̃/ and /a/ with /ɑ/. In the latter case, the outcome is an open central [ä] between the two (not shown on the chart). Standard French contrasts up to 13 oral vowels and up to 4 nasal vowels. The schwa




#french
Many words in French can be analyzed as having a "latent" final consonant that is pronounced only in certain syntactic contexts when the next word begins with a vowel.
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French phonology - Wikipedia
word pronounced with emphatic stress can exhibit gemination of its first syllable-initial consonant: formidable [fːɔʁ.mi.dabl] ('terrific') épouvantable [e.pːu.vɑ̃.tabl] ('horrible') Liaison[edit source] Main article: Liaison (French) <span>Many words in French can be analyzed as having a "latent" final consonant that is pronounced only in certain syntactic contexts when the next word begins with a vowel. For example, the word deux /dø/ ('two') is pronounced [dø] in isolation or before a consonant-initial word (deux jours /dø ʒuʁ/ → [dø.ʒuʁ] 'two days'), but in deux ans /døz‿ɑ̃/ (→ [dø.z




#french
Generally, close-mid vowels ( /e, ø, o/ ) are found in open syllables, and open-mid vowels ( /ɛ, œ, ɔ/ ) are found in closed syllables.
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French phonology - Wikipedia
ously described as close [y] [21] [22] and near-close [ʏ]. [23] Mid vowels[edit source] Although the mid vowels contrast in certain environments, there is limited distributional overlap so they often appear in complementary distribution. <span>Generally, close-mid vowels (/e, ø, o/) are found in open syllables, and open-mid vowels (/ɛ, œ, ɔ/) are found in closed syllables. However, there are minimal pairs: [21] open-mid /ɛ/ and close-mid /e/ contrast in final-position open syllables: allait [a.lɛ] ('was going'), vs. allé [a.le] ('gone'); likewise, op




#french
there is no tense–lax contrast in close vowels.
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French phonology - Wikipedia
his' /œ̃/ † /bʁœ̃/ brun 'brown' /ɛ̃/ [18] /bʁɛ̃/ brin 'twig' Semi-vowels /j/ /jɛʁ/ hier 'yesterday' /ɥ/ /plɥi/ pluie 'rain' /w/ /wi/ oui 'yes' † Not distinguished in all dialects. Close vowels[edit source] In contrast with the mid vowels, <span>there is no tense–lax contrast in close vowels. However, non-phonemic lax (near-close) [ɪ, ʏ, ʊ] appear in the Quebec and Cajun varieties as allophones of /i, y, u/ when the vowel is both phonetically short (so not before /v, z, ʒ, ʁ




#french
The phonemic contrast between front /a/ and back /ɑ/ is sometimes not maintained in Standard French, which leads some researchers to reject the idea of two distinct phonemes.
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French phonology - Wikipedia
distribution. The phonemic oppositions of /ɔ/ and /o/ and of /œ/ and /ø/ in terminal open syllables have been lost in all of France, but not in Belgium, where pot and peau are still opposed as /pɔ/ and /po/. [26] Open vowels[edit source] <span>The phonemic contrast between front /a/ and back /ɑ/ is sometimes not maintained in Standard French, which leads some researchers to reject the idea of two distinct phonemes. [27] However, the distinction is still clearly maintained in other dialects such as Quebec French. [28] While there is much variation among speakers in France, a number of general te




#french
When phonetically realised, schwa ( /ə/ ), also called e caduc ('dropped e') and e muet ('mute e'), is a mid-central vowel with some rounding.
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French phonology - Wikipedia
ulting in a merger of Standard French /ɔ̃/ and /ɛ̃/ in this case. [32] [33] In Quebec French, two of the vowels shift in a different direction: /ɔ̃/ → [õ], more or less as in Europe, but /ɛ̃/ → [ẽ] and /ɑ̃/ → [ã]. [34] Schwa[edit source] <span>When phonetically realised, schwa (/ə/), also called e caduc ('dropped e') and e muet ('mute e'), is a mid-central vowel with some rounding. [21] Many authors consider it to be phonetically identical to /œ/. [35] [36] Geoff Lindsey suggests the symbol /ɵ/. [37] [38] Fagyal, Kibbee & Jenkins (2006) state, more specific