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Canada is countering the United States' move to slap punishing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports by imposing dollar-for-dollar tariffs of its own on everything from steel products to maple syrup.
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hours ago Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland on Thursday announced dollar-for-dollar tariff 'countermeasures' on up to $16.6 billion worth of U.S. imports. (Patrick Doyle/Canadian Press) 9066 comments <span>Canada is countering the United States' move to slap punishing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports by imposing dollar-for-dollar tariffs of its own on everything from steel products to maple syrup. Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada is hitting back with duties of up to $16.6 billion on some steel and aluminum products and other goods from the U.S. — including b




Flashcard 2981173792012

Question
Canada is countering the United States' move to slap punishing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports by imposing [...]
Answer
dollar-for-dollar tariffs of its own on everything from steel products to maple syrup.

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Canada is countering the United States' move to slap punishing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports by imposing dollar-for-dollar tariffs of its own on everything from steel products to maple syrup.

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hours ago Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland on Thursday announced dollar-for-dollar tariff 'countermeasures' on up to $16.6 billion worth of U.S. imports. (Patrick Doyle/Canadian Press) 9066 comments <span>Canada is countering the United States' move to slap punishing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports by imposing dollar-for-dollar tariffs of its own on everything from steel products to maple syrup. Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada is hitting back with duties of up to $16.6 billion on some steel and aluminum products and other goods from the U.S. — including b







She and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made the announcement at a press conference hours after U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross confirmed the United States is following through on its threat to impose tariffs of 25 per cent on imported steel and 10 per cent on imported aluminum, citing national security interests.
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ign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada is hitting back with duties of up to $16.6 billion on some steel and aluminum products and other goods from the U.S. — including beer kegs, whisky, toilet paper and "hair lacquers." <span>She and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made the announcement at a press conference hours after U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross confirmed the United States is following through on its threat to impose tariffs of 25 per cent on imported steel and 10 per cent on imported aluminum, citing national security interests. "This is the strongest trade action Canada has taken in the post-war era. This is a very strong response, it is a proportionate response, it is perfectly reciprocal," Freeland




Flashcard 2981176937740

Question
She and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made the announcement at a press conference hours after U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross confirmed the United States is following through on its threat to impose tariffs of 25 per cent on imported steel and 10 per cent on imported aluminum, citing [...]
Answer
national security interests.

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nouncement at a press conference hours after U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross confirmed the United States is following through on its threat to impose tariffs of 25 per cent on imported steel and 10 per cent on imported aluminum, citing <span>national security interests. <span><body><html>

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ign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada is hitting back with duties of up to $16.6 billion on some steel and aluminum products and other goods from the U.S. — including beer kegs, whisky, toilet paper and "hair lacquers." <span>She and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made the announcement at a press conference hours after U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross confirmed the United States is following through on its threat to impose tariffs of 25 per cent on imported steel and 10 per cent on imported aluminum, citing national security interests. "This is the strongest trade action Canada has taken in the post-war era. This is a very strong response, it is a proportionate response, it is perfectly reciprocal," Freeland







rudeau revealed Thursday that he had offered to go to Washington last week to work out NAFTA details with the president, indicating final negotiations were close — but backed out when he got a call from Vice-President Mike Pence telling him that a meeting could only happen if Canada accepted a controversial sunset clause.

The clause would force all three NAFTA countries to proactively agree — every five years — that they will remain in the trade pact. If they failed to agree, the deal would be killed automatically.

Trudeau called Pence's offer "totally unacceptable."

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stry says U.S. tariffs hurt America first During a call with reporters Thursday morning, Ross said Canada's and Mexico's exemptions were linked to the progress of the NAFTA negotiations, which "are taking longer than we had hoped." T<span>rudeau revealed Thursday that he had offered to go to Washington last week to work out NAFTA details with the president, indicating final negotiations were close — but backed out when he got a call from Vice-President Mike Pence telling him that a meeting could only happen if Canada accepted a controversial sunset clause. The clause would force all three NAFTA countries to proactively agree — every five years — that they will remain in the trade pact. If they failed to agree, the deal would be killed automatically. Trudeau called Pence's offer "totally unacceptable." Mexico, EU to retaliate Mexico responded swiftly with tariffs of its own on U.S. exports of pork bellies, grapes, apples and flat steel, the Associated Press reported. The EU also anno




Denmark has banned the wearing of face veils in public, joining France and other parts of Europe in outlawing the burqa and the niqab worn by some Muslim women.
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the gallery of the Danish parliament at Christiansborg Castle in Copenhagen on Thursday. Denmark joined some other European countries in deciding to ban garments that cover the face. (Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix via Associated Press) <span>Denmark has banned the wearing of face veils in public, joining France and other parts of Europe in outlawing the burqa and the niqab worn by some Muslim women. Parliament voted on Thursday for the law proposed by the centre-right government. Opponents say the ban, which comes into effect on Aug. 1, infringes on women's right to dress as they c




Flashcard 2981183491340

Question
[...] has banned the wearing of face veils in public, joining France and other parts of Europe in outlawing the burqa and the niqab worn by some Muslim women.
Answer
Denmark

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Denmark has banned the wearing of face veils in public, joining France and other parts of Europe in outlawing the burqa and the niqab worn by some Muslim women.

Original toplevel document

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the gallery of the Danish parliament at Christiansborg Castle in Copenhagen on Thursday. Denmark joined some other European countries in deciding to ban garments that cover the face. (Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix via Associated Press) <span>Denmark has banned the wearing of face veils in public, joining France and other parts of Europe in outlawing the burqa and the niqab worn by some Muslim women. Parliament voted on Thursday for the law proposed by the centre-right government. Opponents say the ban, which comes into effect on Aug. 1, infringes on women's right to dress as they c







Flashcard 2981185064204

Question
Denmark has banned the wearing of face veils in public, joining [...] and other parts of Europe in outlawing the burqa and the niqab worn by some Muslim women.
Answer
France

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Denmark has banned the wearing of face veils in public, joining France and other parts of Europe in outlawing the burqa and the niqab worn by some Muslim women.

Original toplevel document

Unknown title
the gallery of the Danish parliament at Christiansborg Castle in Copenhagen on Thursday. Denmark joined some other European countries in deciding to ban garments that cover the face. (Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix via Associated Press) <span>Denmark has banned the wearing of face veils in public, joining France and other parts of Europe in outlawing the burqa and the niqab worn by some Muslim women. Parliament voted on Thursday for the law proposed by the centre-right government. Opponents say the ban, which comes into effect on Aug. 1, infringes on women's right to dress as they c







France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Bulgaria and the German state of Bavaria have all imposed some restrictions on full-face veils in public places.
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weather or complying with other legal requirements, such as using motorcycle helmets under Danish traffic rules. Fines will range from 1,000 Danish crowns ($203 Cdn) for a first offence to 10,000 crowns for the fourth violation. Growing trend <span>France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Bulgaria and the German state of Bavaria have all imposed some restrictions on full-face veils in public places. When the bill was proposed in February, Justice Minister Pape Poulsen, head of the conservative party in a government backed by the nationalist Danish People's Party, said that it is &q




Flashcard 2981188209932

Question
[...] have all imposed some restrictions on full-face veils in public places.
Answer
France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Bulgaria and the German state of Bavaria

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France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Bulgaria and the German state of Bavaria have all imposed some restrictions on full-face veils in public places.

Original toplevel document

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weather or complying with other legal requirements, such as using motorcycle helmets under Danish traffic rules. Fines will range from 1,000 Danish crowns ($203 Cdn) for a first offence to 10,000 crowns for the fourth violation. Growing trend <span>France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Bulgaria and the German state of Bavaria have all imposed some restrictions on full-face veils in public places. When the bill was proposed in February, Justice Minister Pape Poulsen, head of the conservative party in a government backed by the nationalist Danish People's Party, said that it is &q







Article 2981191355660



Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist state. recent years, Patriarch Kirill, the church’s leader, has made public statements on a range of issues, from Russia’s “holy war” in Syria to the “abomination” of gay marriage. The patriarch has also described Putin’s rule as a “miracle of God.” Like many other religious groups, including the Russian Orthodox Church, the Jehovah’s Witnesses have been rocked in recent years by child abuse scandals. In Britain, dozens of current and former members alleged in March that they had been sexually assaulte Putin might be an Orthodox Christian, but if you stand on the streets of Moscow with a sign saying ‘Let’s build a Christian community in Russia,’ then, under our laws, you can be locked up,” he says.



Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist state.
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Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist state. recent years, Patriarch Kirill, the church’s leader, has made public statements on a range of issues, from Russia’s “holy war” in Syria to the “abomination” of gay marriage. The pa




recent years, Patriarch Kirill, the church’s leader, has made public statements on a range of issues, from Russia’s “holy war” in Syria to the “abomination” of gay marriage. The patriarch has also described Putin’s rule as a “miracle of God.”
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ies in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist state. <span>recent years, Patriarch Kirill, the church’s leader, has made public statements on a range of issues, from Russia’s “holy war” in Syria to the “abomination” of gay marriage. The patriarch has also described Putin’s rule as a “miracle of God.” Like many other religious groups, including the Russian Orthodox Church, the Jehovah’s Witnesses have been rocked in recent years by child abuse scandals. In Britain, dozens of cur




Putin might be an Orthodox Christian, but if you stand on the streets of Moscow with a sign saying ‘Let’s build a Christian community in Russia,’ then, under our laws, you can be locked up,” he says.
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gious groups, including the Russian Orthodox Church, the Jehovah’s Witnesses have been rocked in recent years by child abuse scandals. In Britain, dozens of current and former members alleged in March that they had been sexually assaulte <span>Putin might be an Orthodox Christian, but if you stand on the streets of Moscow with a sign saying ‘Let’s build a Christian community in Russia,’ then, under our laws, you can be locked up,” he says.<span><body><html>




Flashcard 2981197384972

Question
Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least [...] members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist state.
Answer
200,000

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Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist stat

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Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist state. recent years, Patriarch Kirill, the church’s leader, has made public statements on a range of issues, from Russia’s “holy war” in Syria to the “abomination” of gay marriage. The pa







Flashcard 2981198957836

Question
Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced [...]t the hands of the officially atheist state.
Answer
imprisonment or discrimination a

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Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist state.

Original toplevel document

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Authorities in the Soviet Union executed at least 200,000 members of the Russian Orthodox clergy, according to Kremlin records, while millions of other Christians faced imprisonment or discrimination at the hands of the officially atheist state. recent years, Patriarch Kirill, the church’s leader, has made public statements on a range of issues, from Russia’s “holy war” in Syria to the “abomination” of gay marriage. The pa