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Flashcard 3416064920844

Question
In algorithm, time complexity is measured in [...] notation
Answer
big-O
^^ FYI, O stands for Order-magnitude

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Flashcard 3416096378124

Question
In algorithms, what is the time complexity of iterating through all items in a single loop?
Answer
O(n)

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Flashcard 3520206867724

Question
In certain cases in formal French, the word ne can be used without signifying negation; the ne in such instances is known as [...]
Answer
expletive ne

« J'ai peur que cela ne se reproduise. » — "I am afraid that it might happen again."

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In certain cases in formal French, the word ne can be used without signifying negation; the ne in such instances is known as expletive ne (French: ne explétif):

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French grammar - Wikipedia
» [same] (literary, ne only) « Je n'ai pu venir. » [same]; cf. phrase « Je ne sais quoi » — "I do not know what [it is]" remaining in colloquial speech as a fossilized phrase Expletive ne[edit] <span>In certain cases in formal French, the word ne can be used without signifying negation; the ne in such instances is known as expletive ne (French: ne explétif): « J'ai peur que cela ne se reproduise. » — "I am afraid that it might happen again." « Il est arrivé avant que nous n'ayons commencé. » — "He arrived before we started." « Ils sont plus







The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law.
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Glorious Revolution - Wikipedia
aidstone Manchester Milton Keynes Newcastle Nottingham Plymouth Poole Portsmouth Reading Rochester Sheffield Shrewsbury Southampton St Albans Torquay Wetherby Worthing York England portal v t e <span>The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law. William's successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascension to the throne as William III of England jointly with his wife, Mary II, James's daughter, after




King James's policies of religious tolerance after 1685 met with increasing opposition from members of leading political circles, who were troubled by the King's Catholicism and his close ties with France.
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Glorious Revolution - Wikipedia
fleet and army led to his ascension to the throne as William III of England jointly with his wife, Mary II, James's daughter, after the Declaration of Right, leading to the Bill of Rights 1689. <span>King James's policies of religious tolerance after 1685 met with increasing opposition from members of leading political circles, who were troubled by the King's Catholicism and his close ties with France. The crisis facing the King came to a head in 1688, with the birth of his son, James, on 10 June (Julian calendar).[a] This changed the existing line of succession by displacing the heir




The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance.
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English Civil War - Wikipedia
l of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver Cromwell Casualties and losses 50,000[1] 34,000[1] 127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a] show v t e English Civil War First Second Third <span>The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between




The Act of Supremacy 1558 renewed the breach and the Elizabethan Settlement charted a course enabling the English church to describe itself as both catholic and reformed:

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Church of England - Wikipedia
his marriage to Catherine of Aragon in 1534.[9] The English Reformation accelerated under Edward VI's regents, before a brief restoration of papal authority under Queen Mary I and King Philip. <span>The Act of Supremacy 1558 renewed the breach and the Elizabethan Settlement charted a course enabling the English church to describe itself as both catholic and reformed: catholic in that it views itself as a part of the universal church of Jesus Christ in unbroken continuity with the early apostolic church. This is expressed in its emphasis on the teachings of the early Church Fathers, as formalised in the Apostles', Nicene, and Athanasian creeds.[10] reformed in that it has been shaped by some of the doctrinal principles of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation, in particular in the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion and the Book of Common Prayer.[10] In the earlier phase of the English Reformation there were both Catholic martyrs and radical Protestant martyrs. The later phases saw the Penal Laws punish Roman Catholic and noncon




The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction.
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Tory - Wikipedia
holds a political philosophy, known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved throughout history. <span>The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction. The philosophy originates from the Cavalier faction, a royalist group during the English Civil War. The Tories political faction that emerged in 1681 was a reaction to the Whig-controll




The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic.
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Whigs (British political party) - Wikipedia
then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Between the 1680s and 1850s, they contested power with their rivals, the Tories. T<span>he Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories back in. The Whig Supremacy (1715–




Flashcard 3586966031628

Question
The Whigs' origin lay in [...] and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic.
Answer
constitutional monarchism

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The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy . The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders , who were Roma

Original toplevel document

Whigs (British political party) - Wikipedia
then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Between the 1680s and 1850s, they contested power with their rivals, the Tories. T<span>he Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories back in. The Whig Supremacy (1715–







Flashcard 3586967604492

Question
The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to [...]. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic.

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The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy . The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders , who were Roman Catholic.

Original toplevel document

Whigs (British political party) - Wikipedia
then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Between the 1680s and 1850s, they contested power with their rivals, the Tories. T<span>he Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories back in. The Whig Supremacy (1715–







Flashcard 3586969177356

Question
The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the [...] of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic.

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The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy . The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders , who were Roman Catholic.

Original toplevel document

Whigs (British political party) - Wikipedia
then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Between the 1680s and 1850s, they contested power with their rivals, the Tories. T<span>he Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories back in. The Whig Supremacy (1715–







Flashcard 3586970750220

Question
The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were [...].
Answer
Roman Catholic

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l monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy . The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders , who were <span>Roman Catholic. <span>

Original toplevel document

Whigs (British political party) - Wikipedia
then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Between the 1680s and 1850s, they contested power with their rivals, the Tories. T<span>he Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories back in. The Whig Supremacy (1715–







Flashcard 3586972323084

Question
The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate [...], are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction.
Answer
monarchism

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The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism , are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction .

Original toplevel document

Tory - Wikipedia
holds a political philosophy, known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved throughout history. <span>The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction. The philosophy originates from the Cavalier faction, a royalist group during the English Civil War. The Tories political faction that emerged in 1681 was a reaction to the Whig-controll







Flashcard 3586973895948

Question
The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the [...] of the Whig faction.
Answer

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thos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism , are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the <span>liberalism of the Whig faction . <span>

Original toplevel document

Tory - Wikipedia
holds a political philosophy, known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved throughout history. <span>The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction. The philosophy originates from the Cavalier faction, a royalist group during the English Civil War. The Tories political faction that emerged in 1681 was a reaction to the Whig-controll







Flashcard 3586975468812

Question
The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "[...]".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction.
Answer
God, King, and Country

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The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism , are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction .

Original toplevel document

Tory - Wikipedia
holds a political philosophy, known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved throughout history. <span>The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction. The philosophy originates from the Cavalier faction, a royalist group during the English Civil War. The Tories political faction that emerged in 1681 was a reaction to the Whig-controll







Flashcard 3586977041676

Question

The Act of Supremacy 1558 renewed the breach and the Elizabethan Settlement charted a course enabling the English church to describe itself as both catholic and reformed:

Answer
universal church

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enewed the breach and the Elizabethan Settlement charted a course enabling the English church to describe itself as both catholic and reformed: catholic in that it views itself as a part of the <span>universal church of Jesus Christ in unbroken continuity with the early apostolic church. This is expressed in its emphasis on the teachings of the early Church Fathers , as formalised in the Apostles' ,

Original toplevel document

Church of England - Wikipedia
his marriage to Catherine of Aragon in 1534.[9] The English Reformation accelerated under Edward VI's regents, before a brief restoration of papal authority under Queen Mary I and King Philip. <span>The Act of Supremacy 1558 renewed the breach and the Elizabethan Settlement charted a course enabling the English church to describe itself as both catholic and reformed: catholic in that it views itself as a part of the universal church of Jesus Christ in unbroken continuity with the early apostolic church. This is expressed in its emphasis on the teachings of the early Church Fathers, as formalised in the Apostles', Nicene, and Athanasian creeds.[10] reformed in that it has been shaped by some of the doctrinal principles of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation, in particular in the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion and the Book of Common Prayer.[10] In the earlier phase of the English Reformation there were both Catholic martyrs and radical Protestant martyrs. The later phases saw the Penal Laws punish Roman Catholic and noncon







Flashcard 3586978614540

Question

The Act of Supremacy 1558 renewed the breach and the Elizabethan Settlement charted a course enabling the English church to describe itself as both catholic and reformed:


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gs of the early Church Fathers , as formalised in the Apostles' , Nicene , and Athanasian creeds.[10] reformed in that it has been shaped by some of the doctrinal principles of the 16th-century <span>Protestant Reformation , in particular in the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion and the Book of Common Prayer . <span>

Original toplevel document

Church of England - Wikipedia
his marriage to Catherine of Aragon in 1534.[9] The English Reformation accelerated under Edward VI's regents, before a brief restoration of papal authority under Queen Mary I and King Philip. <span>The Act of Supremacy 1558 renewed the breach and the Elizabethan Settlement charted a course enabling the English church to describe itself as both catholic and reformed: catholic in that it views itself as a part of the universal church of Jesus Christ in unbroken continuity with the early apostolic church. This is expressed in its emphasis on the teachings of the early Church Fathers, as formalised in the Apostles', Nicene, and Athanasian creeds.[10] reformed in that it has been shaped by some of the doctrinal principles of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation, in particular in the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion and the Book of Common Prayer.[10] In the earlier phase of the English Reformation there were both Catholic martyrs and radical Protestant martyrs. The later phases saw the Penal Laws punish Roman Catholic and noncon







Flashcard 3586980187404

Question
The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between [...] ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance.
Answer
Parliamentarians

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The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads ") and Royalists ("Cavaliers ") over, principally, the manner of England's governance.

Original toplevel document

English Civil War - Wikipedia
l of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver Cromwell Casualties and losses 50,000[1] 34,000[1] 127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a] show v t e English Civil War First Second Third <span>The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between







Flashcard 3586981760268

Question
The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of [...].
Answer
England's governance

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e English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads ") and Royalists ("Cavaliers ") over, principally, the manner of <span>England's governance. <span>

Original toplevel document

English Civil War - Wikipedia
l of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver Cromwell Casualties and losses 50,000[1] 34,000[1] 127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a] show v t e English Civil War First Second Third <span>The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between







Flashcard 3586983333132

Question
The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English [...] with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law.
Answer
Parliamentarians

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The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange , who was James's nephew and son-in-law.

Original toplevel document

Glorious Revolution - Wikipedia
aidstone Manchester Milton Keynes Newcastle Nottingham Plymouth Poole Portsmouth Reading Rochester Sheffield Shrewsbury Southampton St Albans Torquay Wetherby Worthing York England portal v t e <span>The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law. William's successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascension to the throne as William III of England jointly with his wife, Mary II, James's daughter, after







Flashcard 3586984905996

Question
The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and [...].
Answer
son-in-law

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as the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange , who was James's nephew and <span>son-in-law. <span>

Original toplevel document

Glorious Revolution - Wikipedia
aidstone Manchester Milton Keynes Newcastle Nottingham Plymouth Poole Portsmouth Reading Rochester Sheffield Shrewsbury Southampton St Albans Torquay Wetherby Worthing York England portal v t e <span>The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law. William's successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascension to the throne as William III of England jointly with his wife, Mary II, James's daughter, after







Flashcard 3586986478860

Question
King James's policies of religious tolerance after 1685 met with increasing opposition from members of leading political circles, who were troubled by the King's Catholicism and his close ties with [...].
Answer
France

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James's policies of religious tolerance after 1685 met with increasing opposition from members of leading political circles, who were troubled by the King's Catholicism and his close ties with <span>France. <span>

Original toplevel document

Glorious Revolution - Wikipedia
fleet and army led to his ascension to the throne as William III of England jointly with his wife, Mary II, James's daughter, after the Declaration of Right, leading to the Bill of Rights 1689. <span>King James's policies of religious tolerance after 1685 met with increasing opposition from members of leading political circles, who were troubled by the King's Catholicism and his close ties with France. The crisis facing the King came to a head in 1688, with the birth of his son, James, on 10 June (Julian calendar).[a] This changed the existing line of succession by displacing the heir