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on 12-Jan-2019 (Sat)

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By default, rnorm() creates standard normal random variables with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 1. However, the mean and standard devi- ation can be altered using the mean and sd arguments, as illustrated above. Sometimes we want our code to reproduce the exact same set of random numbers; we can use the set.seed() function to do this. The set.seed() set.seed() function takes an (arbitrary) integer argument.

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rnorm()
#applied #ch2
By default, rnorm() creates standard normal random variables with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 1. However, the mean and standard devi- ation can be altered using the mean and sd arguments, as illustrated above. Sometimes we want our code to reproduce the exact same set of random numbers; we can use the set.seed() function to do this. The set.seed() set.seed() function takes an (arbitrary) integer argument.

statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on reading queue position [%]
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