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On 17 January 2019, a vehicle was driven into the General Santander National Police Academy in Bogotá, Colombia

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2019 Bogotá car bombing - Wikipedia
0 Date 17 January 2019 Target National Police of Colombia Attack type Suicide bombing Weapons Car bomb Deaths 20 (+1 attacker)[1] Non-fatal injuries 68 Perpetrators José Aldemar Rojas Rodríguez <span>On 17 January 2019, a vehicle was driven into the General Santander National Police Academy in Bogotá , Colombia . The truck forced its way into the facility, hit a wall and detonated, killing 21 people (including the perpetrator) and injuring 68 others.[2][3] Suicide attacks are unusual in Colomb




The truck forced its way into the facility, hit a wall and detonated, killing 21 people (including the perpetrator) and injuring 68 others.[2][3] Suicide attacks are unusual in Colombia. The car contained about 80 kilograms (180 lb) of pentolite.[4] It is the deadliest attack on the Colombian capital since the 2003 El Nogal Club bombing and the first terrorist attack on the capital since the 2017 Centro Andino bombing.[5]

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2019 Bogotá car bombing - Wikipedia
(+1 attacker)[1] Non-fatal injuries 68 Perpetrators José Aldemar Rojas Rodríguez On 17 January 2019, a vehicle was driven into the General Santander National Police Academy in Bogotá, Colombia. <span>The truck forced its way into the facility, hit a wall and detonated, killing 21 people (including the perpetrator) and injuring 68 others.[2][3] Suicide attacks are unusual in Colombia. The car contained about 80 kilograms (180 lb) of pentolite.[4] It is the deadliest attack on the Colombian capital since the 2003 El Nogal Club bombing and the first terrorist attack on the capital since the 2017 Centro Andino bombing.[5] Contents 1 Background 1.1 Colombian conflict 1.2 Peace dialogue 2 Events 2.1 Planning 2.2 Attack 2.3 Initial investigations 2.4 Peace dialogue ends 3 International reactions 4 Reference




The Colombian conflict started in 1964, although systematic violence in the country can be dated since the end of the 19th century (Thousand Days' War)

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2019 Bogotá car bombing - Wikipedia
conflict 1.2 Peace dialogue 2 Events 2.1 Planning 2.2 Attack 2.3 Initial investigations 2.4 Peace dialogue ends 3 International reactions 4 References Background[edit] Colombian conflict[edit] <span>The Colombian conflict started in 1964, although systematic violence in the country can be dated since the end of the 19th century (Thousand Days' War). The National Liberation Army (ELN) is one of the most prominent actors of the ongoing conflict. For decades, residents of Bogotá lived in fear of being a victim of a bombing by leftist




The National Liberation Army (ELN) is one of the most prominent actors of the ongoing conflict. For decades, residents of Bogotá lived in fear of being a victim of a bombing by leftist rebels or Pablo Escobar's Medellín drug cartel. But as Colombia’s conflict has wound down, and the nation’s largest rebel group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) disarmed under a 2016 peace deal, security has improved and attacks have become less frequent

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2019 Bogotá car bombing - Wikipedia
ackground[edit] Colombian conflict[edit] The Colombian conflict started in 1964, although systematic violence in the country can be dated since the end of the 19th century (Thousand Days' War). <span>The National Liberation Army (ELN) is one of the most prominent actors of the ongoing conflict. For decades, residents of Bogotá lived in fear of being a victim of a bombing by leftist rebels or Pablo Escobar's Medellín drug cartel. But as Colombia’s conflict has wound down, and the nation’s largest rebel group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) disarmed under a 2016 peace deal, security has improved and attacks have become less frequent.[6] Sporadic attacks have affected the city since the peace deal was initiated. The most prominent was an explosion at the upmarket Andino shopping mall in June 2017 which killed three




Sporadic attacks have affected the city since the peace deal was initiated. The most prominent was an explosion at the upmarket Andino shopping mall in June 2017 which killed three people, including a French woman, and injured another 11.[7] Police later arrested several suspected members of a far-left urban guerrilla group called the People Revolutionary’s Movement for the bombing

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2019 Bogotá car bombing - Wikipedia
down, and the nation’s largest rebel group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) disarmed under a 2016 peace deal , security has improved and attacks have become less frequent.[6] <span>Sporadic attacks have affected the city since the peace deal was initiated. The most prominent was an explosion at the upmarket Andino shopping mall in June 2017 which killed three people, including a French woman, and injured another 11.[7] Police later arrested several suspected members of a far-left urban guerrilla group called the People Revolutionary’s Movement for the bombing. Peace dialogue[edit ] The 2016 peace deal between the FARC and Colombian govenrment resulted in the ELN gaining strength in the region.[8] The Colombian government has attempted to est