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on 28-Feb-2019 (Thu)

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Flashcard 3886215728396

Question
In linux, in networking NFS stands for N[...] F[...] S[...]
Answer

Network File System

^^ System is used because NFS is whole system for network file shareing, that involves serval daemons, and a config file (/etc/exports)

^^^ NFS is usually setup on dedicated machine, known as NFS server (so there is good security inforced)


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28. Network File System, NFS
e Previous: 27. DNS and Name Contents Subsections 28.1 Software 28.2 Configuration Example 28.3 Access Permissions 28.4 Security 28.5 Kernel NFS 28. Network File System, NFS This chapter covers <span>NFS, the file-sharing capabilities of UNIX, and describes how to set up directories shareable to other UNIX machines. As soon as one thinks of high-speed Ethernet, the logical possibility o







Flashcard 3886218874124

Question
In linux, in networking, files can be shared among different machines on the network using [...] , which provides some daomon services, and config file, to facilitate this remote file sharing.
Answer

NFS

^^ Network File System


statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
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28. Network File System, NFS
lishes this task in an efficient manner. It is really easy to configure as well. Unlike some other sharing protocols, NFS merely shares files and does not facilitate printing or messaging. 28.1 <span>Software Depending on your distribution, the following programs may be located in any of the bin or sbin directories. These are all daemon processes. To get NFS working, they should be started i







Flashcard 3886221495564

Question
In linux, due to security reasons, you do not setup NFS on all or any random machine in your network but rather create a unique and secured (i.e. firewall protected, et.c) NFS [...] .
Answer
server

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28. Network File System, NFS
that a number of services be running that have no use anywhere else. Many naive administrators create directory exports with impunity, thus exposing those machines to opportunistic hackers. An <span>NFS server should be well hidden behind a firewall, and any Internet server exposed to the Internet should never run the portmap or RPC services. Preferably uninstall all of these services if you







Flashcard 3886224117004

Question
In linux, in networking, files can be shared by machines on a network, via a central NFS server, that has a config file called [...] , that defines which directories are to be shared, and which IP ranges (or domain name wild cards) can access said directories, and for what purpose (i.e ro, read only, rw, readwrite, etc).
Answer
/etc/exports

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28. Network File System, NFS
e first step is deciding on the directory you would like to share. A useful trick is to share your CD-ROM to your whole LAN. This is perfectly safe considering that CDs are read-only. Create an <span>/etc/exports file with the following in it: /mnt/cdrom 192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost(ro) You can immediately see that the format of the /etc/exports file is simply a line for each shareable directory







Flashcard 3886227787020

Question
In linux, in networking, files can be shared by machines on a network, via a central NFS server, that has a config file called /etc/exports, that 1) defines which directories are to be shared, 2) [...LONG PHRASE HERE...] , and 3) the level of access to the shared directories (i.e ro, read only, rw, readwrite, etc).
Answer

which IP ranges (or domain name wild cards) can access said directories

^^ e.g. content of /etc/exports:
/mnt/cdrom *.mynet.mydomain.co.za(ro)
/some/folder 192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost(ro)


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28. Network File System, NFS
u would like to share. A useful trick is to share your CD-ROM to your whole LAN. This is perfectly safe considering that CDs are read-only. Create an /etc/exports file with the following in it: <span>/mnt/cdrom 192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost(ro) You can immediately see that the format of the /etc/exports file is simply a line for each shareable directory. Next to each directory name goes a list







Flashcard 3886230408460

Question
In linux, in networking, files can be shared by machines on a network, via a central NFS server, that has a file called /etc/exports, that 1) [...] , 2) which IP ranges (or domain name wild cards) can access said directories, and 3) the level of access to the said directories (i.e ro, read only, rw, readwrite, etc).
Answer

defines which of its (i.e. the DNS servers) directories are to be shared

^^^ e.g. content of /etc/exports:
/mnt/cdrom *.mynet.mydomain.co.za(ro)
/some/folder 192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost(ro)


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28. Network File System, NFS
e to share. A useful trick is to share your CD-ROM to your whole LAN. This is perfectly safe considering that CDs are read-only. Create an /etc/exports file with the following in it: /mnt/cdrom <span>192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost(ro) You can immediately see that the format of the /etc/exports file is simply a line for each shareable directory. Next to each directory name goes a list of hosts that are a







Flashcard 3886233029900

Question

In linux, in networking, files can be shared by machines on a network, via a central NFS server, that has a file called /etc/exports, that 1) defines which of its directories are to be shared, 2) which IP ranges (or domain name wild cards) can access said directories, and 3) [...]

Answer

the level of access to the directories to be shared (i.e ro, read only, rw, readwrite, etc).

^^ e.g. content of /etc/exports:
/mnt/cdrom *.mynet.mydomain.co.za(ro)
/some/folder 192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost(ro)


statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
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28. Network File System, NFS
s to share your CD-ROM to your whole LAN. This is perfectly safe considering that CDs are read-only. Create an /etc/exports file with the following in it: /mnt/cdrom 192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost<span>(ro) You can immediately see that the format of the /etc/exports file is simply a line for each shareable directory. Next to each directory name goes a list of hosts that are allowed to conn







Flashcard 3886235651340

Question

In linux, in networking, the NFS server has a config file called /etc/exports, with following content:

/mnt/cdrom *.mynet.mydomain.co.za(ro)
/some/folder 192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost(ro)

what do each of the above columns mean (i.e. explain in detail all the columns in the first row/line).

Answer
Means /mnt/cdrom directory (of the NFS server) is being shared, and all machines in the mynet.mydomain.co.za domain can have readonly access to directory

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
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28. Network File System, NFS
rfectly safe considering that CDs are read-only. Create an /etc/exports file with the following in it: /mnt/cdrom 192.168.1.0/24(ro) localhost(ro) You can immediately see that the format of the <span>/etc/exports file is simply a line for each shareable directory. Next to each directory name goes a list of hosts that are allowed to connect. In this case, those allowed access are all IP addresses







Flashcard 3886238272780

Question
In linux, in networking, say you have an NFS (Network File System) server with fully qualified host name of nfsserver1, and you want to have access to its /some/folder shared directory. How do you do it (i.e. what command do you issue)?
Answer

mount -t nfs nfsserver1:/some/folder /mnt/nfs

^^ note we need to mount the share folder on the nfs server
^^^ note the use of -t flag to set the mount type to nfs
^^^^ note how we treat the share folder on nfsserver1 (i.e. nfsserver1:/some/folder) as any other device that is mounted
^^^^^ note the /mnt/nfs folder can be any mount folder you create (I am just useing /mnt/nfs as an example.


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28. Network File System, NFS
g the exportfs command with no options should then show /mnt/cdrom 192.168.1.0/24 /mnt/cdrom localhost.localdomain which lists directories and hosts allowed to access them. It is useful to test <span>mounts from your local machine before testing from a remote machine. Here we perform the NFS mounting operation proper: mkdir /mnt/nfs mount -t nfs localhost:/mnt/cdrom /mnt/nfs You can see t







Flashcard 3886417579276

Question
CHO citral Citral
Answer
[default - edit me]

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