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on 16-Sep-2020 (Wed)

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It has been seven years since Khasi was taken off the Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger. But the language is still fighting to retain its place in the lives of the people of Meghalaya, losing out to the English mish-mash that youngsters laughingly call ‘Khalish’.

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in the recent MTV India Music Summit It is an audacious idea: to present the Western opera, barely there on the Indian music scene, in a language that was in danger of extinction till recently. <span>It has been seven years since Khasi was taken off the Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger. But the language is still fighting to retain its place in the lives of the people of Meghalaya, losing out to the English mish-mash that youngsters laughingly call ‘Khalish’. For Neil Nongkynrih, the pianist who founded the phenomenally talented Shillong Chamber Choir in 2001, getting Khasi heard beyond the hills of Meghalaya is an important part of his musi