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“Another complication is the emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites. Certain malaria-endemic countries have even abandoned chloroquine for P. vivax treatment. Fortunately chloroquine is still effective in India. But the currently used anti-relapse drug, Primaquine, has many undesirable side-effects, especially in patients with a genetic defect called G6PD deficiency. Moreover, it takes 14 days to administer this drug for radical cure... there is an urgent need for development of a new class of drugs,” adds Dr. Ghosh. The researchers add that this assay could also be used to test if a specific anti-malarial drug would work for an individual, thus paving the way for individualised treatment for patients.

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mosquitoes’ salivary glands, added to cultured liver cells (multiple human hepatocyte platforms) and studied. This approach can be used to further study the liver stage in P. vivax life cycle. <span>“Another complication is the emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites. Certain malaria-endemic countries have even abandoned chloroquine for P. vivax treatment. Fortunately chloroquine is still effective in India. But the currently used anti-relapse drug, Primaquine, has many undesirable side-effects, especially in patients with a genetic defect called G6PD deficiency. Moreover, it takes 14 days to administer this drug for radical cure... there is an urgent need for development of a new class of drugs,” adds Dr. Ghosh. The researchers add that this assay could also be used to test if a specific anti-malarial drug would work for an individual, thus paving the way for individualised treatment for patients. A letter from the Editor Dear reader, We have been keeping you up-to-date with information on the developments in India and the world that have a bearing on our health and wellbeing, ou




Air pollution helps COVID transmission, finds study

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adesh Karnataka Kerala Tamil Nadu Telangana Other States Andhra Pradesh Karnataka Kerala Tamil Nadu Telangana Other States Watch | All about Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine News States Kerala Kerala <span>Air pollution helps COVID transmission, finds study Staff Reporter Kozhikode, August 03, 2020 19:31 IST Updated: August 04, 2020 10:30 IST Staff Reporter Kozhikode, August 03, 2020 19:31 IST Updated: August 04, 2020 10:30 IST Improved ai




Scientists find 77 new butterfly species in Matheran

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bad Kochi Kolkata Mumbai Kozhikode Madurai Mangaluru Puducherry Thiruvananthapuram Tiruchirapalli Vijayawada Visakhapatnam Watch | All about Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine News Cities Mumbai Mumbai <span>Scientists find 77 new butterfly species in Matheran Lalatendu Mishra MUMBAI , August 09, 2020 23:44 IST Updated: August 10, 2020 00:52 IST Lalatendu Mishra MUMBAI , August 09, 2020 23:44 IST Updated: August 10, 2020 00:52 IST Three-membe




This was when the Universe was 1.4 billion years old — just 10% of its current age — and galaxies were still forming.

The “baby” SPT0418-47 was picked up by the powerful Alma radio telescope in Chile using a technique called gravitational lensing, where a nearby galaxy acts as a powerful magnifying glass, the ESO said in a statement.

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ht to reach Earth and so our image of it is from deep in the past, said the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which was involved in the discovery. Also read | A first look at a forming world <span>This was when the Universe was 1.4 billion years old — just 10% of its current age — and galaxies were still forming. The “baby” SPT0418-47 was picked up by the powerful Alma radio telescope in Chile using a technique called gravitational lensing, where a nearby galaxy acts as a powerful magnifying glass, the ESO said in a statement. It has features similar to our Milky Way — a rotating disc and a bulge, which is the high density of stars packed tightly around the galactic centre. “This is the first time a bulge has




A golden halo glinting 12 billion light years away is the farthest galaxy resembling our Milky Way yet spotted,

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le 2 PRINT A A A Reconstructed view of “baby Milky Way” SPT0418-47. Photo: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), Rizzo et al. Infant star system challenges our understanding of the early years of the Universe. <span>A golden halo glinting 12 billion light years away is the farthest galaxy resembling our Milky Way yet spotted, astronomers said on August 12, adding the “surprisingly unchaotic” infant star system challenges our understanding of the early years of the Universe. The galaxy, called SPT0418-47, is




Based on Hubble Space Telescope observations, scientists said they believe Betelgeuse ejected a huge hot, dense cloud of material into space that cooled to form dust, shielding the star's light and making it appear dimmer from the perspective of viewers on Earth.

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the dramatic dimming observed last year and earlier this year of one of the brightest stars in the night sky, a colossus called Betelgeuse that appears to be on its way toward a violent death. <span>Based on Hubble Space Telescope observations, scientists said they believe Betelgeuse ejected a huge hot, dense cloud of material into space that cooled to form dust, shielding the star's light and making it appear dimmer from the perspective of viewers on Earth. Betelgeuse is classified as a red supergiant, the largest type of star. It is more than 10 times the mass of our sun. If it resided at the center of our solar system, its surface would




cientists suspect Betelgeuse — pronounced “beetle juice” — is nearing the end of its life cycle when it will use up its nuclear fuel and explode, relatively soon in cosmic terms, in an event known as a supernova.

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ed as a red supergiant, the largest type of star. It is more than 10 times the mass of our sun. If it resided at the center of our solar system, its surface would extend to the planet Jupiter. S<span>cientists suspect Betelgeuse — pronounced “beetle juice” — is nearing the end of its life cycle when it will use up its nuclear fuel and explode, relatively soon in cosmic terms, in an event known as a supernova. “Frankly, we don't know for sure how soon Betelgeuse will go supernova,” astrophysicist Andrea Dupree, director of the Solar Stellar Planetary Sciences Division at the Harvard-Smithsoni




“Newborn babies’ body temperature is usually at 36.5 to 37.5 degrees Celsius.

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mia or cooling is well documented and is even the standard care for such babies,” explains Dr.B.H. Prathik from the Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health in Bengaluru, an author of the paper. <span>“Newborn babies’ body temperature is usually at 36.5 to 37.5 degrees Celsius. But in this treatment, they are wrapped in a small blanket of 33.5 degrees Celsius for 72 hours and gradually rewarmed. We are still studying if this method will work in our country and




“Newborn babies’ body temperature is usually at 36.5 to 37.5 degrees Celsius.

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mia or cooling is well documented and is even the standard care for such babies,” explains Dr.B.H. Prathik from the Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health in Bengaluru, an author of the paper. <span>“Newborn babies’ body temperature is usually at 36.5 to 37.5 degrees Celsius. But in this treatment, they are wrapped in a small blanket of 33.5 degrees Celsius for 72 hours and gradually rewarmed. We are still studying if this method will work in our country and




In August 1970, in a paper in Nature, relativist C. V. Vishveshwara first published a calculation and plot of the signal that would be given out by a single perturbed black hole. This was the disturbance, or gravitational wave, that would emerge from a black hole when it was hit by a bunch of radiation. It implied that when a black hole is struck, it gives off a sound like a bell, only that it muffles quickly – more like a wooden bell than a silver bell.

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15, 2020 19:39 IST Updated: August 16, 2020 20:09 IST The calculation of how a perturbed black hole rings out Share Article 1 PRINT A A A The calculation of how a perturbed black hole rings out <span>In August 1970, in a paper in Nature, relativist C. V. Vishveshwara first published a calculation and plot of the signal that would be given out by a single perturbed black hole. This was the disturbance, or gravitational wave, that would emerge from a black hole when it was hit by a bunch of radiation. It implied that when a black hole is struck, it gives off a sound like a bell, only that it muffles quickly – more like a wooden bell than a silver bell. When he did this calculation, Vishveshwara was a Research Associate at the Institute of Space Studies at New York. “Those were the times when the concept of the existence of black holes




ASTROSAT, Indias first multi- wavelength satellite observatory, has detected an extreme ultraviolet (UV) light from a galaxy which is 9.3 billion light-years away from Earth, the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) said on Monday.

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s instruments mounted on top. Photo courtesy: ISRO The multi- wavelength satellite, has detected an extreme ultraviolet (UV) light from a galaxy which is 9.3 billion light-years away from Earth <span>ASTROSAT, Indias first multi- wavelength satellite observatory, has detected an extreme ultraviolet (UV) light from a galaxy which is 9.3 billion light-years away from Earth, the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) said on Monday. (Subscribe to our Today's Cache newsletter for a quick snapshot of top 5 tech stories. Click here to subscribe for free.) A release from the Pune-based Inter-University Centre for Astro




ASTROSAT, Indias first multi- wavelength satellite observatory, has detected an extreme ultraviolet (UV) light from a galaxy which is 9.3 billion light-years away from Earth, the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) said on Monday.

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s instruments mounted on top. Photo courtesy: ISRO The multi- wavelength satellite, has detected an extreme ultraviolet (UV) light from a galaxy which is 9.3 billion light-years away from Earth <span>ASTROSAT, Indias first multi- wavelength satellite observatory, has detected an extreme ultraviolet (UV) light from a galaxy which is 9.3 billion light-years away from Earth, the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) said on Monday. (Subscribe to our Today's Cache newsletter for a quick snapshot of top 5 tech stories. Click here to subscribe for free.) A release from the Pune-based Inter-University Centre for Astro




The Assam keelback snake has been sighted by a team from the Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun, for the first time since 1869.

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ted in a muddy stream in the Poba reserve forest | Photo Credit: Abhijit Das The team also recorded 400 plants, 270 butterflies, 25 amphibians and 44 reptiles, 239 birds and at least 20 mammals <span>The Assam keelback snake has been sighted by a team from the Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun, for the first time since 1869. This snake was spotted in 2018 by zoologist Abhijit Das when he, along with a team, was retracing the Abor expedition – an iconic expedition that took place from 1911-1912 that had yiel




The team notes that the States of northeast India, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha, Chhattisgarh, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand are the most fire-prone in India.

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tween healthy vegetation and burnt forest areas can easily be identified and highlighted byremote sensing burn indices. It can be a promising tool for land resource managers and fire officials. <span>The team notes that the States of northeast India, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha, Chhattisgarh, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand are the most fire-prone in India. Previous studies using forecasting models and in-situ observations in western Himalaya have shown a sharp increase of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and ozone during high fire activit




Watch | Polar bears could go extinct by 2100

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bears could go extinct by 2100 Share On Sci-Tech Science Technology Health Agriculture Environment Gadgets Internet Watch | All about Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine Sci-Tech Environment Environment <span>Watch | Polar bears could go extinct by 2100 The Hindu Net Desk July 31, 2020 12:40 IST Updated: July 31, 2020 12:40 IST The Hindu Net Desk July 31, 2020 12:40 IST Updated: July 31, 2020 12:40 IST A video on climate change starvin




Even if humanity were able to cap global warming at 2.4 degrees Celcius it would probably only delay the polar bears’ collapse.

The threat is not rising temperatures per se but the top-of-the-food-chain predators’ inability to adapt to a rapidly shifting environment.

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piral, with shrinking sea-ice cutting short the time bears have for hunting seals. Their dwindling bodyweight undermines their chances of surviving Arctic winters without food, scientists said. <span>Even if humanity were able to cap global warming at 2.4 degrees Celcius it would probably only delay the polar bears’ collapse. The threat is not rising temperatures per se but the top-of-the-food-chain predators’ inability to adapt to a rapidly shifting environment. Half of Earth’s land-based megafauna are classified as threatened with extinction, but only polar bears are endangered primarily by climate change. But according to the authors of the r




C.S. Seshadri, a leader in algebraic geometry

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eshadri, a leader in algebraic geometry Share On 2 News National International States Cities Coronavirus | India likely had 6.4 million infections in May: ICMR serosurvey News National National <span>C.S. Seshadri, a leader in algebraic geometry V. Balaji T.R. Ramadas July 18, 2020 13:40 IST Updated: July 18, 2020 17:31 IST V. Balaji T.R. Ramadas July 18, 2020 13:40 IST Updated: July 18, 2020 17:31 IST He achieved several break




Humans lived in America 30,000 years ago, far earlier than thought: study

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ago, far earlier than thought: study Share On 2 Sci-Tech Science Technology Health Agriculture Environment Gadgets Internet Watch | All about Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine Sci-Tech Science Science <span>Humans lived in America 30,000 years ago, far earlier than thought: study Reuters WASHINGTON, July 23, 2020 06:41 IST Updated: July 23, 2020 07:50 IST Reuters WASHINGTON, July 23, 2020 06:41 IST Updated: July 23, 2020 07:50 IST The research also implicated hu




Stone tools unearthed in a cave in central Mexico and other evidence from 42 far-flung archeological sites indicate people arrived in North America earlier than previously known, upwards of 30,000 years ago.

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cultural layers in the cave. | Photo Credit: Devlin A. Gandy/ www.joh.cam.ac.uk The research also implicated humans in the extinctions of many large Ice Age mammals such as mammoths and camels. <span>Stone tools unearthed in a cave in central Mexico and other evidence from 42 far-flung archeological sites indicate people arrived in North America earlier than previously known, upwards of 30,000 years ago. Scientists said on Wednesday they had found 1,930 limestone tools, including small flakes and fine blades that may have been used for cutting meat and small points that may have been us




The Chinese Mars probe named Tianwen 1 or Quest for Heavenly Truth 1, will fulfil three scientific objectives: orbiting the red planet for comprehensive observation, landing on Martian soil and sending a rover to roam the landing site.

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g an orbiter and a rover, was sent into the Earth-Mars transfer orbit, embarking on an almost seven-month journey to the red planet, according to the China National Space Administration (CNSA). <span>The Chinese Mars probe named Tianwen 1 or Quest for Heavenly Truth 1, will fulfil three scientific objectives: orbiting the red planet for comprehensive observation, landing on Martian soil and sending a rover to roam the landing site. It will conduct scientific investigations into the planet’s soil, geological structure, environment, atmosphere and water, media reports said. It should arrive in orbit around the red p