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on 10-Sep-2022 (Sat)

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This was from a post of someone talking about a Japanese text they read (so take Japan with a grain of salt):

There's often talk of how many x thousand words is enough to cover x% of any average text. A book I was reading had statistics for a few languages.

English

1000 words covers 80.5%

2000 words covers 86.6%

5000 words covers 93.5%

French

1000 words covers 83.5%

2000 words covers 89.4%

5000 words covers 96.0%

Spanish

1000 words covers 81.0%

2000 words covers 86.6%

5000 words covers 92.5%

Chinese (Mandarin)

1000 words covers 73.0%

2000 words covers 82.2%

5000 words covers 91.64%

Japanese

1000 words covers 60.5%

2000 words covers 70.0%

5000 words covers 81.7%

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sh Turkish Dutch Lithuanian Greek Ukrainian Home About Pricing Forum Blog Log in Sign Up Free LingQ Forums Open Forum Vocabulary Coverage Ratios roan Japan Vocabulary coverage ratios April 2011 <span>There's often talk of how many x thousand words is enough to cover x% of any average text. A book I was reading had statistics for a few languages. English 1000 words covers 80.5% 2000 words covers 86.6% 5000 words covers 93.5% French 1000 words covers 83.5% 2000 words covers 89.4% 5000 words covers 96.0% Spanish 1000 words covers 81.0% 2000 words covers 86.6% 5000 words covers 92.5% Chinese (Mandarin) 1000 words covers 73.0% 2000 words covers 82.2% 5000 words covers 91.64% Japanese 1000 words covers 60.5% 2000 words covers 70.0% 5000 words covers 81.7% Korean 1000 words covers 73.9% 2000 words covers 81.2% 5000 words covers 89.3% Russian 1000 words covers 67.46% 2000 words covers 80.0% 5000 words covers 92.0% German 1000 words covers




Progressive Summarization
#Tiago_Forte
Not only is it okay if I don’t remember the vast majority of what I read, that actually becomes my goal. I want to offload what I’ve learned as quickly as possible, so I can forget it as quickly as possible. I want my mind to be an empty vessel, a staging ground where ideas briefly stop in their journey from the outside world, to my second brain.
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Progressive Summarization II: Examples and Metaphors - Forte Labs
" /> Mind as staging ground With a method in hand for rapidly capturing knowledge and compressing it into multi-layered packets for easy retrieval, the whole game of learning is transformed. <span>Not only is it okay if I don’t remember the vast majority of what I read, that actually becomes my goal. I want to offload what I’ve learned as quickly as possible, so I can forget it as quickly as possible. I want my mind to be an empty vessel, a staging ground where ideas briefly stop in their journey from the outside world, to my second brain. This is what it looks like to be fully present, and to also reach my intellectual potential. To leave my mind free and clear for each new experience, while also building something that




Progressive Summarization
#Tiago_Forte
Here’s the crucial thing to understand: I don’t summarize notes on any sort of schedule, in any particular order, or as a part of a workflow. I summarize them completely opportunistically, when I’m already reviewing the note for some other purpose anyway.
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Progressive Summarization II: Examples and Metaphors - Forte Labs
. This is what it looks like to be fully present, and to also reach my intellectual potential. To leave my mind free and clear for each new experience, while also building something that lasts. <span>Here’s the crucial thing to understand: I don’t summarize notes on any sort of schedule, in any particular order, or as a part of a workflow. I summarize them completely opportunistically, when I’m already reviewing the note for some other purpose anyway. This seems to be very hard for most people to understand, or to trust. It runs contrary to everything we’ve been taught about knowledge as some sort of fungible commodity, like oil or s




Progressive Summarization
#Tiago_Forte
A given note may not be summarized until months or years after it’s been captured. Many notes may never be summarized. This is not just acceptable, it is absolutely fundamental to focusing your attention primarily on your most valuable notes. This is how your first brain works: use it or lose it. You have to be comfortable not only letting things fall through the cracks, but placing the cracks strategically so notes that don’t end up being useful automatically recede from your attention.
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Progressive Summarization II: Examples and Metaphors - Forte Labs
each layer, in sequence, on a strict timetable. It is a network — with local neighborhoods, city centers, and superhighways all changing in different ways, at different speeds, as it should be. <span>A given note may not be summarized until months or years after it’s been captured. Many notes may never be summarized. This is not just acceptable, it is absolutely fundamental to focusing your attention primarily on your most valuable notes. This is how your first brain works: use it or lose it. You have to be comfortable not only letting things fall through the cracks, but placing the cracks strategically so notes that don’t end up being useful automatically recede from your attention. The great power of digital technology — that it never forgets anything — is a curse in an era of attention deficit. We need to add to our “digital cognition” mechanisms for forgetting.