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The voting paradox (also known as Condorcet's paradox or the paradox of voting

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Voting paradox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
bly not affect the outcome, see Paradox of voting. This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2012) <span>The voting paradox (also known as Condorcet's paradox or the paradox of voting) is a situation noted by the Marquis de Condorcet in the late 18th century, in which collective preferences can be cyclic (i.e., not transitive), even if the preferences of individual v




in which collective preferences can be cyclic (i.e., not transitive), even if the preferences of individual voters are not.

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Voting paradox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
ions to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2012) The voting paradox (also known as Condorcet's paradox or the paradox of voting) is a situation noted by the Marquis de Condorcet in the late 18th century, <span>in which collective preferences can be cyclic (i.e., not transitive), even if the preferences of individual voters are not. This is paradoxical, because it means that majority wishes can be in conflict with each other. When this occurs, it is because the conflicting majorities are each made up of different gr




requirement of majority rule then provides no clear winner.

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Voting paradox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
n be argued that B should win instead, since two voters (1 and 2) prefer B to C and only one voter (3) prefers C to B. However, by the same argument A is preferred to B, and C is preferred to A, by a margin of two to one on each occasion. The <span>requirement of majority rule then provides no clear winner. Also, if an election were held with the above three voters as the only participants, nobody would win under majority rule, as it would result in a three way tie with each candidate getti




Flashcard 149622985

Question
The voting paradox (also known as Condorcet's paradox or the paradox of
Answer
voting


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The voting paradox (also known as Condorcet's paradox or the paradox of voting

Original toplevel document

Voting paradox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
bly not affect the outcome, see Paradox of voting. This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2012) <span>The voting paradox (also known as Condorcet's paradox or the paradox of voting) is a situation noted by the Marquis de Condorcet in the late 18th century, in which collective preferences can be cyclic (i.e., not transitive), even if the preferences of individual v







Flashcard 149622997

Question
The voting paradox (also known as [...]s paradox or the paradox of voting
Answer
Condorcet'


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Parent (intermediate) annotation

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The voting paradox (also known as Condorcet's paradox or the paradox of voting

Original toplevel document

Voting paradox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
bly not affect the outcome, see Paradox of voting. This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2012) <span>The voting paradox (also known as Condorcet's paradox or the paradox of voting) is a situation noted by the Marquis de Condorcet in the late 18th century, in which collective preferences can be cyclic (i.e., not transitive), even if the preferences of individual v