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That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norm
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t’s right, nuclear-powered—cruise missile. For Putin, these weapons are a source of national pride and speak to Russia’s continued great power status despite the country’s increased alienation from the West and long-running economic doldrums. <span>That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norms. Amid all this, the Russian president has also swiped at bilateral arms control between the United States and Russia in the post-Cold War era, saying in October 2017 that it was time f




Flashcard 2979011628300

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That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of [...] to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norm
Answer
Georgia

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That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norm </s

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t’s right, nuclear-powered—cruise missile. For Putin, these weapons are a source of national pride and speak to Russia’s continued great power status despite the country’s increased alienation from the West and long-running economic doldrums. <span>That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norms. Amid all this, the Russian president has also swiped at bilateral arms control between the United States and Russia in the post-Cold War era, saying in October 2017 that it was time f







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That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norm

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t’s right, nuclear-powered—cruise missile. For Putin, these weapons are a source of national pride and speak to Russia’s continued great power status despite the country’s increased alienation from the West and long-running economic doldrums. <span>That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norms. Amid all this, the Russian president has also swiped at bilateral arms control between the United States and Russia in the post-Cold War era, saying in October 2017 that it was time f




Flashcard 2979014774028

Question
That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to th[...]nd amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norm

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That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norm

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t’s right, nuclear-powered—cruise missile. For Putin, these weapons are a source of national pride and speak to Russia’s continued great power status despite the country’s increased alienation from the West and long-running economic doldrums. <span>That alienation has intensified in recent years in no small part due to Putin’s decision to test the sinews of the post-Cold War order. Beginning with the 2008 invasion of parts of Georgia to the 2014 invasion of Crimea and amplified most recently in the poisoning of a former spy in the United Kingdom, Putin’s Russia is slowly testing the limits of international norms. Amid all this, the Russian president has also swiped at bilateral arms control between the United States and Russia in the post-Cold War era, saying in October 2017 that it was time f







Russia’s growing interest in the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite.

More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades

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i-satellite weapon. Dubbed the Nudol, or PL19, the weapon has been tested at least six times since 2015. The most recent test was the first to see the missile launched from its eventual transporter, suggesting that the program is progressing. <span>Russia’s growing interest in the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite. More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades. The prospect may seem far-fetched now, but it merits serious consideration. While a lot of what Putin showed off in March—including the Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile and t




Flashcard 2979019492620

Question

Russia’s growing interest in the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that [...] took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite.

More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades

Answer
China

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the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that <span>China took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite. More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threateni

Original toplevel document

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i-satellite weapon. Dubbed the Nudol, or PL19, the weapon has been tested at least six times since 2015. The most recent test was the first to see the missile launched from its eventual transporter, suggesting that the program is progressing. <span>Russia’s growing interest in the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite. More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades. The prospect may seem far-fetched now, but it merits serious consideration. While a lot of what Putin showed off in March—including the Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile and t







Flashcard 2979021065484

Question

Russia’s growing interest in the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it [...]

More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades


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tellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it <span>shot down a weather satellite. More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain

Original toplevel document

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i-satellite weapon. Dubbed the Nudol, or PL19, the weapon has been tested at least six times since 2015. The most recent test was the first to see the missile launched from its eventual transporter, suggesting that the program is progressing. <span>Russia’s growing interest in the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite. More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades. The prospect may seem far-fetched now, but it merits serious consideration. While a lot of what Putin showed off in March—including the Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile and t







Flashcard 2979022638348

Question

Russia’s growing interest in the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite.

More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to [...]

Answer
orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades

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eptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite. More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to <span>orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades <span><body><html>

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i-satellite weapon. Dubbed the Nudol, or PL19, the weapon has been tested at least six times since 2015. The most recent test was the first to see the missile launched from its eventual transporter, suggesting that the program is progressing. <span>Russia’s growing interest in the development of anti-satellite weapons raises an uneasy prospect: that Putin, in another act of norm defiance, may authorize the test of an interceptor against a live satellite in stable low-Earth orbit, repeating the disastrous step that China took in 2007 when it shot down a weather satellite. More than two-thousand distinct pieces of debris from that Chinese interception continue to orbit the Earth at high speeds, threatening other satellites. Hundreds of pieces will remain threatening for decades. The prospect may seem far-fetched now, but it merits serious consideration. While a lot of what Putin showed off in March—including the Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile and t







Satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEO) aren’t just placidly hovering; they’re maintaining their orbital trajectories by moving at speeds of 17,000 mph or more. Re-entry vehicles, meanwhile, have the distinction of coming back down to Earth.
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ile defense. It just so happens that the fundamentals of taking out a ballistic missile re-entry vehicle in space and a satellite are quite similar, even if how we commonly think about these two classes of objects might have little in common. <span>Satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEO) aren’t just placidly hovering; they’re maintaining their orbital trajectories by moving at speeds of 17,000 mph or more. Re-entry vehicles, meanwhile, have the distinction of coming back down to Earth. In 2008, the United States showed how blurred these lines can be when an Aegis-equipped U.S. Navy Ticonderoga-class cruiser USS Lake Erie launched a Standard Missile-3 interceptor—origi




Flashcard 2979027356940

Question
[...] (LEO) aren’t just placidly hovering; they’re maintaining their orbital trajectories by moving at speeds of 17,000 mph or more. Re-entry vehicles, meanwhile, have the distinction of coming back down to Earth.
Answer
Satellites in low-Earth orbit

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Satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEO) aren’t just placidly hovering; they’re maintaining their orbital trajectories by moving at speeds of 17,000 mph or more. Re-entry vehicles, meanwhile, have the distinction of comi

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ile defense. It just so happens that the fundamentals of taking out a ballistic missile re-entry vehicle in space and a satellite are quite similar, even if how we commonly think about these two classes of objects might have little in common. <span>Satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEO) aren’t just placidly hovering; they’re maintaining their orbital trajectories by moving at speeds of 17,000 mph or more. Re-entry vehicles, meanwhile, have the distinction of coming back down to Earth. In 2008, the United States showed how blurred these lines can be when an Aegis-equipped U.S. Navy Ticonderoga-class cruiser USS Lake Erie launched a Standard Missile-3 interceptor—origi