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The observation that the universe is expanding has led to the current view that about 14 billion years ago the currently visible universe was concentrated into a point-like region that exploded in an event called the Big Bang .
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In particular, the strong force , a short-range but powerful attractive force between nucleons (protons and neutrons), bound these particles together into nuclei.
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the electromagnetic force , a relatively weak but long-range force between electric charges, bound electrons to nuclei to form atoms, and the universe acquired the potential for complex chemistry and the existence of life
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subatomic particles are distinguished by their atomic number , Z , the number of protons in the nucleus of an atom of the element.
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Many elements have a number of isotopes , which are atoms with the same atomic number but different atomic masses.
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These isotopes are distinguished by the mass number , A , which is the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus
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The mass number is also sometimes termed more appropriately the nucleon number .
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SHORT TUTORIAL FOR USING CalculiX GraphiX (cgx) AS PREPROCESSOR Conventions in this tutorial: K: keyboard command LMP: press left mouse button LMR: release left mouse button LMPR: press and release the left mouse button MM: press middle mouse button RM: press right mouse button M: move mouse (no pressing or releasing) V: visible result E: press enter **: comment
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#has-images
[imagelink] A Pomodoro kitchen timer, after which the method is named

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s.[1] The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks. These intervals are named pomodoros, the plural in English of the Italian word pomodoro (tomato), after the tomato-shaped kitchen timer that Cirillo used as a university student.[2][3]

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Pomodoro Technique - Wikipedia
hy competition is now open! Photograph a historic site, learn more about our history, and win prizes. Pomodoro Technique From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigation Jump to search <span>A Pomodoro kitchen timer, after which the method is named The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s.[1] The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks. These intervals are named pomodoros, the plural in English of the Italian word pomodoro (tomato), after the tomato-shaped kitchen timer that Cirillo used as a university student.[2][3] The technique has been widely popularized by dozens of apps and websites providing timers and instructions. Closely related to concepts such as timeboxing and iterative and incremental




There are six steps in the original technique:

  1. Decide on the task to be done.
  2. Set the pomodoro timer (traditionally to 25 minutes).[1]
  3. Work on the task.
  4. End work when the timer rings and put a checkmark on a piece of paper.[5]
  5. If you have fewer than four checkmarks, take a short break (3–5 minutes), then go to step 2.
  6. After four pomodoros, take a longer break (15–30 minutes), reset your checkmark count to zero, then go to step 1.
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Pomodoro Technique - Wikipedia
e design, the method has been adopted in pair programming contexts.[4] Contents 1 Underlying principles 2 Tools 2.1 Software 3 See also 4 References 5 External links Underlying principles[edit] <span>There are six steps in the original technique: Decide on the task to be done. Set the pomodoro timer (traditionally to 25 minutes).[1] Work on the task. End work when the timer rings and put a checkmark on a piece of paper.[5] If you have fewer than four checkmarks, take a short break (3–5 minutes), then go to step 2. After four pomodoros, take a longer break (15–30 minutes), reset your checkmark count to zero, then go to step 1. The stages of planning, tracking, recording, processing and visualizing are fundamental to the technique. In the planning phase, tasks are prioritized by recording them in a "To Do Toda




The stages of planning, tracking, recording, processing and visualizing are fundamental to the technique. In the planning phase, tasks are prioritized by recording them in a "To Do Today" list. This enables users to estimate the effort tasks require. As pomodoros are completed, they are recorded, adding to a sense of accomplishment and providing raw data for subsequent self-observation and improvement.[1]
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Pomodoro Technique - Wikipedia
ewer than four checkmarks, take a short break (3–5 minutes), then go to step 2. After four pomodoros, take a longer break (15–30 minutes), reset your checkmark count to zero, then go to step 1. <span>The stages of planning, tracking, recording, processing and visualizing are fundamental to the technique. In the planning phase, tasks are prioritized by recording them in a "To Do Today" list. This enables users to estimate the effort tasks require. As pomodoros are completed, they are recorded, adding to a sense of accomplishment and providing raw data for subsequent self-observation and improvement.[1] For the purposes of the technique, a pomodoro is the interval of time spent working.[1] After task completion, any time remaining in the Pomodoro is devoted to overlearning. Regular bre




For the purposes of the technique, a pomodoro is the interval of time spent working.[1] After task completion, any time remaining in the Pomodoro is devoted to overlearning. Regular breaks are taken, aiding assimilation. A short (3–5 minutes) rest separates consecutive pomodoros. Four pomodoros form a set. A longer (15–30 minute) rest is taken between sets.[1][6]
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Pomodoro Technique - Wikipedia
estimate the effort tasks require. As pomodoros are completed, they are recorded, adding to a sense of accomplishment and providing raw data for subsequent self-observation and improvement.[1] <span>For the purposes of the technique, a pomodoro is the interval of time spent working.[1] After task completion, any time remaining in the Pomodoro is devoted to overlearning. Regular breaks are taken, aiding assimilation. A short (3–5 minutes) rest separates consecutive pomodoros. Four pomodoros form a set. A longer (15–30 minute) rest is taken between sets.[1][6] A goal of the technique is to reduce the impact of internal and external interruptions on focus and flow. A pomodoro is indivisible; when interrupted during a pomodoro, either the other




A goal of the technique is to reduce the impact of internal and external interruptions on focus and flow. A pomodoro is indivisible; when interrupted during a pomodoro, either the other activity must be recorded and postponed (inform – negotiate – schedule – call back) or the pomodoro must be abandoned.[1][6][7]
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Pomodoro Technique - Wikipedia
. Regular breaks are taken, aiding assimilation. A short (3–5 minutes) rest separates consecutive pomodoros. Four pomodoros form a set. A longer (15–30 minute) rest is taken between sets.[1][6] <span>A goal of the technique is to reduce the impact of internal and external interruptions on focus and flow. A pomodoro is indivisible; when interrupted during a pomodoro, either the other activity must be recorded and postponed (inform – negotiate – schedule – call back) or the pomodoro must be abandoned.[1][6][7] Tools[edit] The creator and his proponents encourage a low-tech approach, using a mechanical timer, paper, and pencil. The physical act of winding the timer confirms the user's determin




#IEP #aristoteles
Aristotle sees the universe as a scale lying between the two extremes: form without matter is on one end, and matter without form is on the other end. The passage of matter into form must be shown in its various stages in the world of nature. To do this is the object of Aristotle's physics, or philosophy of nature. It is important to keep in mind that the passage from form to matter within nature is a movement towards ends or purposes.
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Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
sting life, and perfect blessedness, engaged in never-ending contemplation. For a fuller discussion, see the article Aristotle's Metaphysics and Western Concepts of God. 5. Philosophy of Nature <span>Aristotle sees the universe as a scale lying between the two extremes: form without matter is on one end, and matter without form is on the other end. The passage of matter into form must be shown in its various stages in the world of nature. To do this is the object of Aristotle's physics, or philosophy of nature. It is important to keep in mind that the passage from form to matter within nature is a movement towards ends or purposes. Everything in nature has its end and function, and nothing is without its purpose. Everywhere we find evidences of design and rational plan. No doctrine of physics can ignore the fundam




Flashcard 3290125700364

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[...] sees in his [...] the universe as a scale lying between the two extremes: form without matter is on one end, and matter without form is on the other end. The passage of matter into form must be shown in its various stages in the world of nature. It is important to keep in mind that the passage from form to matter within nature is a movement towards ends or purposes.
Answer
Aristotle
physics

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Aristotle sees the universe as a scale lying between the two extremes: form without matter is on one end, and matter without form is on the other end. The passage of matter into form must be show

Original toplevel document

Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
sting life, and perfect blessedness, engaged in never-ending contemplation. For a fuller discussion, see the article Aristotle's Metaphysics and Western Concepts of God. 5. Philosophy of Nature <span>Aristotle sees the universe as a scale lying between the two extremes: form without matter is on one end, and matter without form is on the other end. The passage of matter into form must be shown in its various stages in the world of nature. To do this is the object of Aristotle's physics, or philosophy of nature. It is important to keep in mind that the passage from form to matter within nature is a movement towards ends or purposes. Everything in nature has its end and function, and nothing is without its purpose. Everywhere we find evidences of design and rational plan. No doctrine of physics can ignore the fundam







Flashcard 3290128059660

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Question
Aristotle sees the universe as a scale lying between the two extremes: [...] without [...] is on one end, and [...] without [...] is on the other end. The passage from [...] to [...] within nature is a movement towards ends or purposes.
Answer
form matter
matter form
form matter

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Aristotle sees the universe as a scale lying between the two extremes: form without matter is on one end, and matter without form is on the other end. The passage of matter into form must be shown in its various stages in the world of nature. To do this is the

Original toplevel document

Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
sting life, and perfect blessedness, engaged in never-ending contemplation. For a fuller discussion, see the article Aristotle's Metaphysics and Western Concepts of God. 5. Philosophy of Nature <span>Aristotle sees the universe as a scale lying between the two extremes: form without matter is on one end, and matter without form is on the other end. The passage of matter into form must be shown in its various stages in the world of nature. To do this is the object of Aristotle's physics, or philosophy of nature. It is important to keep in mind that the passage from form to matter within nature is a movement towards ends or purposes. Everything in nature has its end and function, and nothing is without its purpose. Everywhere we find evidences of design and rational plan. No doctrine of physics can ignore the fundam







#IEP #aristoteles
The main subject of Aristoteles physics is the scale of being, as a scale of values. What is higher has more advanced principle of form in it. Species on this scale are eternally fixed in their place, and cannot evolve over time. Goes from plants to animals to humans.
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Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
ty of space and time, and the paradoxes proposed byZeno, Aristotle argues that space and time are potentially divisible ad infinitum, but are not actually so divided. After these preliminaries, <span>Aristotle passes to the main subject of physics, the scale of being. The first thing to notice about this scale is that it is a scale of values. What is higher on the scale of being is of more worth, because the principle of form is more advanced in it. Species on this scale are eternally fixed in their place, and cannot evolve over time. The higher items on the scale are also more organized. Further, the lower items are inorganic and the higher are organic. The principle which gives internal organization to the higher




Flashcard 3290133564684

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The main subject of Aristoteles physics is the scale of [...], as a scale of values. What is higher has more advanced principle of [...] in it. Species on this scale are eternally fixed in their place, and cannot evolve over time. Goes from plants to animals to humans.
Answer
being
form

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The main subject of Aristoteles physics is the scale of being, as a scale of values. What is higher has more advanced principle of form in it. Species on this scale are eternally fixed in their place, and cannot evolve over time. Goes from plants

Original toplevel document

Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
ty of space and time, and the paradoxes proposed byZeno, Aristotle argues that space and time are potentially divisible ad infinitum, but are not actually so divided. After these preliminaries, <span>Aristotle passes to the main subject of physics, the scale of being. The first thing to notice about this scale is that it is a scale of values. What is higher on the scale of being is of more worth, because the principle of form is more advanced in it. Species on this scale are eternally fixed in their place, and cannot evolve over time. The higher items on the scale are also more organized. Further, the lower items are inorganic and the higher are organic. The principle which gives internal organization to the higher







#IEP #aristoteles
To Aristotle, motion is the passage of matter into form, and it is of four kinds:
(1) affecting the substance of a thing, particularly its beginning and its ending;
(2) bringing changes in quality;
(3) bringing changes in quantity;
(4) locomotion, or change of place (most important)
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Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
and function, and nothing is without its purpose. Everywhere we find evidences of design and rational plan. No doctrine of physics can ignore the fundamental notions of motion, space, and time. <span>Motion is the passage of matter into form, and it is of four kinds: (1) motion which affects the substance of a thing, particularly its beginning and its ending; (2) motion which brings about changes in quality; (3) motion which brings about changes in quantity, by increasing it and decreasing it; and (4) motion which brings about locomotion, or change of place. Of these the last is the most fundamental and important. Aristotle rejects the definition of space as the void. Empty space is an impossibility. Hence, too, he disagrees with the view of Plato and the Pythagoreans that the elements are compo




Flashcard 3290139069708

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Question
To [...], motion is the passage of matter into form, and it is of four kinds
Answer
Aristotle

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To Aristotle, motion is the passage of matter into form, and it is of four kinds: (1) affecting the substance of a thing, particularly its beginning and its ending; (2) bringing changes in quality;

Original toplevel document

Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
and function, and nothing is without its purpose. Everywhere we find evidences of design and rational plan. No doctrine of physics can ignore the fundamental notions of motion, space, and time. <span>Motion is the passage of matter into form, and it is of four kinds: (1) motion which affects the substance of a thing, particularly its beginning and its ending; (2) motion which brings about changes in quality; (3) motion which brings about changes in quantity, by increasing it and decreasing it; and (4) motion which brings about locomotion, or change of place. Of these the last is the most fundamental and important. Aristotle rejects the definition of space as the void. Empty space is an impossibility. Hence, too, he disagrees with the view of Plato and the Pythagoreans that the elements are compo







Flashcard 3290141429004

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#IEP #aristoteles
Question
To Aristotle, motion is the passage of matter into form, and it is of four kinds:
(1) affecting the [...] of a thing, particularly its beginning and its ending;
(2) bringing changes in [...] ;
(3) bringing changes in [...] ;
(4) [...] , or change of place (most important)
Answer
substance
quality
quantity
locomotion

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To Aristotle, motion is the passage of matter into form, and it is of four kinds: (1) affecting the substance of a thing, particularly its beginning and its ending; (2) bringing changes in quality; (3) bringing changes in quantity; (4) locomotion, or change of place (most important) </sp

Original toplevel document

Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
and function, and nothing is without its purpose. Everywhere we find evidences of design and rational plan. No doctrine of physics can ignore the fundamental notions of motion, space, and time. <span>Motion is the passage of matter into form, and it is of four kinds: (1) motion which affects the substance of a thing, particularly its beginning and its ending; (2) motion which brings about changes in quality; (3) motion which brings about changes in quantity, by increasing it and decreasing it; and (4) motion which brings about locomotion, or change of place. Of these the last is the most fundamental and important. Aristotle rejects the definition of space as the void. Empty space is an impossibility. Hence, too, he disagrees with the view of Plato and the Pythagoreans that the elements are compo