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an OS is the interface between the end user and the computer hardware.
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
ully understand the underlying technology to do great work. We don't have to care about any of this to be great, which is pretty amazing. Basics So what really is an operating system? In short, <span>an OS is the interface between the end user and the computer hardware. To start, the hardware is generally controlled by something known as firmware, which is the code built into the electronics that tell them all how to run as individual components. Firmw




To start, the hardware is generally controlled by something known as firmware, which is the code built into the electronics that tell them all how to run as individual components.
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
ve to care about any of this to be great, which is pretty amazing. Basics So what really is an operating system? In short, an OS is the interface between the end user and the computer hardware. <span>To start, the hardware is generally controlled by something known as firmware, which is the code built into the electronics that tell them all how to run as individual components. Firmware is the OS for the hardware, but on a normal computer, is not considered part of the OS the user interacts with. Coordinating individual hardware components is the kernel, the c




Coordinating individual hardware components is the kernel, the core of the operating system, which coordinates those individual components so that the computer can run.
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
the electronics that tell them all how to run as individual components. Firmware is the OS for the hardware, but on a normal computer, is not considered part of the OS the user interacts with. <span>Coordinating individual hardware components is the kernel, the core of the operating system, which coordinates those individual components so that the computer can run. Software, as we think of it, is the code that a user interacts with, but the kernel, even if we never interact with it directly, is still software as the core of the OS. Running on top




Running on top of the OS is more software, which are what we think of as processes and programs.
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
t the computer can run. Software, as we think of it, is the code that a user interacts with, but the kernel, even if we never interact with it directly, is still software as the core of the OS. <span>Running on top of the OS is more software, which are what we think of as processes and programs. These user processes interface with the OS, which then do all the work with the kernel to ensure the processes work properly. Responsibilities of an Operating System We know that the OS




Central Processing Unit (CPU)
  • The circuitry which executes the instructions that the OS gives
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
OS is responsible for ensuring hardware is used appropriately, but what does that look like? First we have to think about what hardware is on a computer. Some important pieces of hardware are: <span>Central Processing Unit (CPU) The circuitry which executes the instructions that the OS gives it. Don't worry too much about what this means beyond the idea that processes are a series of instructions that need somewhere to run, and it happens here. We'll get to that eventually




Random Access Memory (RAM)

  • RAM are chips that provide fast, temporary storage for information
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
get to that eventually There can be multiple CPUs in a computer, and multiple processes on a CPU. There is a ton of complexity here that we are able to abstract away. Thanks Operating Systems! <span>Random Access Memory (RAM) RAM are chips that provide fast, temporary storage for information and is required for computers to run quickly. The OS uses RAM to ensure that the CPUs get the information they need. Input/Output (I/O) Devices Hard Drives/Storage Devices These storage dev




Hard Drives/Storage Devices
  • These storage devices are slow, but can contain a great deal of information.
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
t provide fast, temporary storage for information and is required for computers to run quickly. The OS uses RAM to ensure that the CPUs get the information they need. Input/Output (I/O) Devices <span>Hard Drives/Storage Devices These storage devices are slow, but can contain a great deal of information. Data from 'file systems' is loaded into RAM by the operating system when needed. Mice/Keyboards The OS listens for mouse movements and key presses and responds so that a user can drive




Processor Management: The OS prioritizes which processes are run by the CPUs at what time, ensuring smooth execution.
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
is happening The OS doesn't need the monitor to run, but the user needs it ... and many more Now that we have discussed some of the hardware, we will discuss the most important roles of an OS. <span>Processor Management: The OS prioritizes which processes are run by the CPUs at what time, ensuring smooth execution. Memory Management: The OS prioritizes what goes in RAM for the CPUs to access. If a CPU needs information and it isn't in RAM yet, the computer will run slowly. Device Management: The O




Memory Management: The OS prioritizes what goes in RAM for the CPUs to access
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
ed some of the hardware, we will discuss the most important roles of an OS. Processor Management: The OS prioritizes which processes are run by the CPUs at what time, ensuring smooth execution. <span>Memory Management: The OS prioritizes what goes in RAM for the CPUs to access. If a CPU needs information and it isn't in RAM yet, the computer will run slowly. Device Management: The OS manages I/O Devices and passes them to different processes as required. File




If a CPU needs information and it isn't in RAM yet, the computer will run slowly.
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
cessor Management: The OS prioritizes which processes are run by the CPUs at what time, ensuring smooth execution. Memory Management: The OS prioritizes what goes in RAM for the CPUs to access. <span>If a CPU needs information and it isn't in RAM yet, the computer will run slowly. Device Management: The OS manages I/O Devices and passes them to different processes as required. File Management: The OS keeps track of files and organizes them, as well as passes acce




Device Management: The OS manages I/O Devices and passes them to different processes as required.
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Computing Fundamentals: Operating Systems
time, ensuring smooth execution. Memory Management: The OS prioritizes what goes in RAM for the CPUs to access. If a CPU needs information and it isn't in RAM yet, the computer will run slowly. <span>Device Management: The OS manages I/O Devices and passes them to different processes as required. File Management: The OS keeps track of files and organizes them, as well as passes access to different processes. Security: If defenses are programmed in, the OS attempts to identify un




Flashcard 6507966369036

Question
ue créée par Jimmy Wales et Larry Sanger le 15 janvier 2001 . Il s'agit d'une œuvre libre, c'est-à-
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Wikipédia — Wikipédia
Propriétaire Wikimedia Foundation Créé par Jimmy Wales et Larry Sanger Lancement 15 janvier 2001 État actuel En activité modifier Wikipédia Écouter est une encyclopédie universelle et multiling<span>ue créée par Jimmy Wales et Larry Sanger le 15 janvier 2001. Il s'agit d'une œuvre libre, c'est-à-dire que chacun est libre de la rediffuser. Gérée en wiki dans le site web wikipedia.org grâce au logiciel MediaWiki, elle permet à tous les internautes d'écrire et de modifier des artic