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#english #game #strauss
Her tongue darted out of her mouth. "Hey, not so fast," I told her, as if she were the one hitting on me. The key to physical escalation, David DeAngelo had said in his seminar, is always two steps forward, one step back.
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#english #game #strauss
I'd figured out my own routine. It was a simple struc- ture that allowed me to determine the direction in which I needed to take a girl: First, open. Then demonstrate higher value. Next, build rapport and an emotional connection. And, finally, create a physical connection.
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#english #game #strauss
For years, nervous AFCs who were new to the community were told to take the newbie mission. It involved simply showering, putting on nice clothes, going to the nearest shopping center, and smiling and saying "hi" to every woman who passed by. Many AFCs found that this not only helped them overcome their shyness, but that some women actually stopped to talk.
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Flashcard 7552231935244

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Question

The [...] War or Franco-German War,[a] often referred to in France as the War of 1870, was a conflict between the Second French Empire and the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia. Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused primarily by France's determination to reassert its dominant position in continental Europe, which appeared in question following the decisive Prussian victory over Austria in 1866.[12] According to some historians, Prussian chancellor Otto von Bismarck deliberately provoked the French into declaring war on Prussia in order to induce four independent southern German states—Baden, Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse-Darmstadt—to join the North German Confederation; other historians contend that Bismarck exploited the circumstances as they unfolded. All agree that Bismarck recognized the potential for new German alliances, given the situation as a whole.[13]

In the waning days of the war, with German victory all but assured, the German states proclaimed their union as the German Empire under the Prussian king Wilhelm I and Chancellor Bismarck. With the notable exception of Austria, the vast majority of Germans were united under a nation-state for the first time. Following an armistice with France, the Treaty of Frankfurt was signed on 10 May 1871, giving Germany billions of francs in war indemnity, as well as most of Alsace and parts of Lorraine, which became the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine ( Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen ).

The war had a lasting impact on Europe. By hastening German unification, the war sig

...
Answer
Franco-Prussian

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The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War,[a] often referred to in France as the War of 1870, was a conflict between the Second French Empire and the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Pru

Original toplevel document

Franco-Prussian War - Wikipedia
eval Vendôme Pesmes Longeau Epuisay Nuits Saint Georges Tours Hallue Péronne Bapaume Rocroi Villersexel Le Mans Lisaine Longwy St. Quentin 2nd Buzenval Pontarlier Belgian reaction Paris Commune <span>The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War,[a] often referred to in France as the War of 1870, was a conflict between the Second French Empire and the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia. Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused primarily by France's determination to reassert its dominant position in continental Europe, which appeared in question following the decisive Prussian victory over Austria in 1866.[12] According to some historians, Prussian chancellor Otto von Bismarck deliberately provoked the French into declaring war on Prussia in order to induce four independent southern German states—Baden, Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse-Darmstadt—to join the North German Confederation; other historians contend that Bismarck exploited the circumstances as they unfolded. All agree that Bismarck recognized the potential for new German alliances, given the situation as a whole.[13] France mobilised its army on 15 July 1870, leading the North German Confederation to respond with its own mobilisation later that day. On 16 July 1870, the French parliament voted to declare war on Prussia; France invaded German territory on 2 August. The German coalition mobilised its troops much more effectively than the French and invaded northeastern France on 4 August. German forces were superior in numbers, training, and leadership and made more effective use of modern technology, particularly railways and artillery. A series of swift Prussian and German victories in eastern France, culminating in the Siege of Metz and the Battle of Sedan, resulted in the capture of the French Emperor Napoleon III and the decisive defeat of the army of the Second Empire; a Government of National Defense was formed in Paris on 4 September and continued the war for another five months. German forces fought and defeated new French armies in northern France, then besieged Paris for over four months before it fell on 28 January 1871, effectively ending the war. In the waning days of the war, with German victory all but assured, the German states proclaimed their union as the German Empire under the Prussian king Wilhelm I and Chancellor Bismarck. With the notable exception of Austria, the vast majority of Germans were united under a nation-state for the first time. Following an armistice with France, the Treaty of Frankfurt was signed on 10 May 1871, giving Germany billions of francs in war indemnity, as well as most of Alsace and parts of Lorraine, which became the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine (Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen). The war had a lasting impact on Europe. By hastening German unification, the war significantly altered the balance of power on the continent; with the new German nation state supplanting France as the dominant European land power. Bismarck maintained great authority in international affairs for two decades, developing a reputation for adept and pragmatic diplomacy that raised Germany's global stature and influence. In France, it brought a final end to imperial rule and began the first lasting republican government. Resentment over France's defeat triggered the Paris Commune, a revolutionary uprising which seized and held power for two months before its bloody suppression; the event would influence the politics and policies of the Third Republic. Contents 1 Causes 2 Opposing forces 2.1 French 2.2 Prussians/Germans 3 French Army incursion 3.1 Preparations for the offensive 3.2 Occupation of Saarbrücken 4 Prussian Army advance 4.1







Flashcard 7552233508108

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The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War,[a] often referred to in France as the War of [...], was a conflict between the Second French Empire and the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia. Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused primarily by France's determination to reassert its dominant position in continental Europe, which appeared in question following the decisive Prussian victory over Austria in 1866.[12] According to some historians, Prussian chancellor Otto von Bismarck deliberately provoked the French into declaring war on Prussia in order to induce four independent southern German states—Baden, Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse-Darmstadt—to join the North German Confederation; other historians contend that Bismarck exploited the circumstances as they unfolded. All agree that Bismarck recognized the potential for new German alliances, given the situation as a whole.[13]

In the waning days of the war, with German victory all but assured, the German states proclaimed their union as the German Empire under the Prussian king Wilhelm I and Chancellor Bismarck. With the notable exception of Austria, the vast majority of Germans were united under a nation-state for the first time. Following an armistice with France, the Treaty of Frankfurt was signed on 10 May 1871, giving Germany billions of francs in war indemnity, as well as most of Alsace and parts of Lorraine, which became the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine ( Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen ).

The war had a lasting impact on Europe. By hastening German unification,

...
Answer
1870

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The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War,[a] often referred to in France as the War of 1870, was a conflict between the Second French Empire and the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia. Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused

Original toplevel document

Franco-Prussian War - Wikipedia
eval Vendôme Pesmes Longeau Epuisay Nuits Saint Georges Tours Hallue Péronne Bapaume Rocroi Villersexel Le Mans Lisaine Longwy St. Quentin 2nd Buzenval Pontarlier Belgian reaction Paris Commune <span>The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War,[a] often referred to in France as the War of 1870, was a conflict between the Second French Empire and the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia. Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused primarily by France's determination to reassert its dominant position in continental Europe, which appeared in question following the decisive Prussian victory over Austria in 1866.[12] According to some historians, Prussian chancellor Otto von Bismarck deliberately provoked the French into declaring war on Prussia in order to induce four independent southern German states—Baden, Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse-Darmstadt—to join the North German Confederation; other historians contend that Bismarck exploited the circumstances as they unfolded. All agree that Bismarck recognized the potential for new German alliances, given the situation as a whole.[13] France mobilised its army on 15 July 1870, leading the North German Confederation to respond with its own mobilisation later that day. On 16 July 1870, the French parliament voted to declare war on Prussia; France invaded German territory on 2 August. The German coalition mobilised its troops much more effectively than the French and invaded northeastern France on 4 August. German forces were superior in numbers, training, and leadership and made more effective use of modern technology, particularly railways and artillery. A series of swift Prussian and German victories in eastern France, culminating in the Siege of Metz and the Battle of Sedan, resulted in the capture of the French Emperor Napoleon III and the decisive defeat of the army of the Second Empire; a Government of National Defense was formed in Paris on 4 September and continued the war for another five months. German forces fought and defeated new French armies in northern France, then besieged Paris for over four months before it fell on 28 January 1871, effectively ending the war. In the waning days of the war, with German victory all but assured, the German states proclaimed their union as the German Empire under the Prussian king Wilhelm I and Chancellor Bismarck. With the notable exception of Austria, the vast majority of Germans were united under a nation-state for the first time. Following an armistice with France, the Treaty of Frankfurt was signed on 10 May 1871, giving Germany billions of francs in war indemnity, as well as most of Alsace and parts of Lorraine, which became the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine (Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen). The war had a lasting impact on Europe. By hastening German unification, the war significantly altered the balance of power on the continent; with the new German nation state supplanting France as the dominant European land power. Bismarck maintained great authority in international affairs for two decades, developing a reputation for adept and pragmatic diplomacy that raised Germany's global stature and influence. In France, it brought a final end to imperial rule and began the first lasting republican government. Resentment over France's defeat triggered the Paris Commune, a revolutionary uprising which seized and held power for two months before its bloody suppression; the event would influence the politics and policies of the Third Republic. Contents 1 Causes 2 Opposing forces 2.1 French 2.2 Prussians/Germans 3 French Army incursion 3.1 Preparations for the offensive 3.2 Occupation of Saarbrücken 4 Prussian Army advance 4.1







Flashcard 7552235080972

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Question

The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War,[a] often referred to in France as the War of 1870, was a conflict between the Second French Empire and the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia. Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused primarily by France's determination to reassert its dominant position in continental Europe, which appeared in question following the decisive Prussian victory over Austria in 1866.[12] According to some historians, Prussian chancellor [...] deliberately provoked the French into declaring war on Prussia in order to induce four independent southern German states—Baden, Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse-Darmstadt—to join the North German Confederation; other historians contend that Bismarck exploited the circumstances as they unfolded. All agree that Bismarck recognized the potential for new German alliances, given the situation as a whole.[13]

In the waning days of the war, with German victory all but assured, the German states proclaimed their union as the German Empire under the Prussian king Wilhelm I and Chancellor Bismarck. With the notable exception of Austria, the vast majority of Germans were united under a nation-state for the first time. Following an armistice with France, the Treaty of Frankfurt was signed on 10 May 1871, giving Germany billions of francs in war indemnity, as well as most of Alsace and parts of Lorraine, which became the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine ( Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen ).

The war had a lasting impact on Europe. By hastening German unification, the war significantly alte

...
Answer
Otto von Bismarck

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ssert its dominant position in continental Europe, which appeared in question following the decisive Prussian victory over Austria in 1866.[12] According to some historians, Prussian chancellor <span>Otto von Bismarck deliberately provoked the French into declaring war on Prussia in order to induce four independent southern German states—Baden, Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse-Darmstadt—to join the Nor

Original toplevel document

Franco-Prussian War - Wikipedia
eval Vendôme Pesmes Longeau Epuisay Nuits Saint Georges Tours Hallue Péronne Bapaume Rocroi Villersexel Le Mans Lisaine Longwy St. Quentin 2nd Buzenval Pontarlier Belgian reaction Paris Commune <span>The Franco-Prussian War or Franco-German War,[a] often referred to in France as the War of 1870, was a conflict between the Second French Empire and the North German Confederation led by the Kingdom of Prussia. Lasting from 19 July 1870 to 28 January 1871, the conflict was caused primarily by France's determination to reassert its dominant position in continental Europe, which appeared in question following the decisive Prussian victory over Austria in 1866.[12] According to some historians, Prussian chancellor Otto von Bismarck deliberately provoked the French into declaring war on Prussia in order to induce four independent southern German states—Baden, Württemberg, Bavaria and Hesse-Darmstadt—to join the North German Confederation; other historians contend that Bismarck exploited the circumstances as they unfolded. All agree that Bismarck recognized the potential for new German alliances, given the situation as a whole.[13] France mobilised its army on 15 July 1870, leading the North German Confederation to respond with its own mobilisation later that day. On 16 July 1870, the French parliament voted to declare war on Prussia; France invaded German territory on 2 August. The German coalition mobilised its troops much more effectively than the French and invaded northeastern France on 4 August. German forces were superior in numbers, training, and leadership and made more effective use of modern technology, particularly railways and artillery. A series of swift Prussian and German victories in eastern France, culminating in the Siege of Metz and the Battle of Sedan, resulted in the capture of the French Emperor Napoleon III and the decisive defeat of the army of the Second Empire; a Government of National Defense was formed in Paris on 4 September and continued the war for another five months. German forces fought and defeated new French armies in northern France, then besieged Paris for over four months before it fell on 28 January 1871, effectively ending the war. In the waning days of the war, with German victory all but assured, the German states proclaimed their union as the German Empire under the Prussian king Wilhelm I and Chancellor Bismarck. With the notable exception of Austria, the vast majority of Germans were united under a nation-state for the first time. Following an armistice with France, the Treaty of Frankfurt was signed on 10 May 1871, giving Germany billions of francs in war indemnity, as well as most of Alsace and parts of Lorraine, which became the Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine (Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen). The war had a lasting impact on Europe. By hastening German unification, the war significantly altered the balance of power on the continent; with the new German nation state supplanting France as the dominant European land power. Bismarck maintained great authority in international affairs for two decades, developing a reputation for adept and pragmatic diplomacy that raised Germany's global stature and influence. In France, it brought a final end to imperial rule and began the first lasting republican government. Resentment over France's defeat triggered the Paris Commune, a revolutionary uprising which seized and held power for two months before its bloody suppression; the event would influence the politics and policies of the Third Republic. Contents 1 Causes 2 Opposing forces 2.1 French 2.2 Prussians/Germans 3 French Army incursion 3.1 Preparations for the offensive 3.2 Occupation of Saarbrücken 4 Prussian Army advance 4.1







Flashcard 7552251071756

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#causality #statistics
Question

Assumptions of [...]:

1. Unconfoundedness (Assumption 2.2)

2. Positivity (Assumption 2.3)

3. No interference (Assumption 2.4)

4. Consistency (Assumption 2.5)

Answer
causal inference

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Assumptions of causal inference: 1. Unconfoundedness (Assumption 2.2) 2. Positivity (Assumption 2.3) 3. No interference (Assumption 2.4) 4. Consistency (Assumption 2.5)

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#ML-engineering #ML_in_Action #learning #machine #software-engineering

You’re the first-hired DS for a company. On your first week, an executive from marketing approaches you, explaining (in their terms) a serious business issue that they are having. They need to figure out an efficient means of communicating to customers through email to let them know of upcoming sales that they might be interested in. With very little additional detail provided to you, the executive merely says, “I want to see the click and open rates go up on our emails.” If this is the only information supplied, and repeated queries to members of the marketing team simply state the same end goal of increasing the clicking and opening rate, the number of avenues to pursue seems limitless. Left to your own devices, do you focus on

- content recommendation and craft custom emails for each user?

- Provide predictions with an NLP-backed system that will craft relevant subject lines for each user?

- Attempt to predict a list of products most relevant to the customer base to put on sale each day?

With so many options of varying complexity and approaches, and little guidance, creating a solution that is aligned with the expectations of the executive is highly unlikely.

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ch" redirects here. For other uses, see Metternich (disambiguation).

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His Most Serene Highness The Prince of Metternich-Winneburg zu Beilstein
Portrait by Thomas Lawrence, 1815
Chancellor of the Austrian Empire
In office
25 May 1821 – 13 March 1848
Monarch
Preceded by Office established
Succeeded by Franz Anton as Minister-President
Foreign Minister of the Austrian Empire
In office
8 October 1809 – 13 March 1848
Monarch
Preceded by Count Warthausen
Succeeded by
...
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#English #vocabulary

eschew

/ɪsˈtʃuː,ɛsˈtʃuː/

Learn to pronounce

verb

gerund or present participle: eschewing

  1. deliberately avoid using; abstain from.

    "he appealed to the crowd to eschew violence"

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#ML-engineering #ML_in_Action #learning #machine #software-engineering
By focusing on what will be built and why it needs to be built, both the DS team and the business are able to guide the discussion more fruitfully. Eschewing a conversation focused on how it will be built keeps the DS members of the group focused on the problem. Ignoring when it will be built by helps the business keep its focus aligned on the needs of the project. Avoiding discussing implementation details at this (very early, initial) stage of the project is not merely critical for the team to focus on the problem. Keeping the esoteric details of algorithms and solution design out of discussions with the larger team keeps the business unit members engaged. After all, they really don’t care how many eggs go into the mix, what color the eggs are, or even what species laid the eggs; they just want to eat the cake when it’s done. We will cover the processes of planning, having project expectation discussions with internal business customers, and general communications about ML work with a nontechnical audience at length and in much greater depth throughout the remainder of part 1
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#ML-engineering #ML_in_Action #learning #machine #software-engineering

Scoping and research

If you switch your approach halfway through development, you’ll face a hard conversation with the business to explain that the project’s delays are due to you not doing your homework

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