Edited, memorised or added to reading list

on 23-May-2018 (Wed)

Do you want BuboFlash to help you learning these things? Click here to log in or create user.

#betancourt #probability-theory
Once the philosophy has been stripped away, probability theory is simply the study of probability distributions, and the transformations of distributions between different spaces.
a probability distribution assigns real values between 0 and 1 to suitable sets of measurable spaces,
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Probability Theory (For Scientists and Engineers)
space are denoted Borel σσ-algebras (Folland 1999). Because common spaces have natural topologies they consequently also have natural Borel σσ-algebras that exclude pathological sets that can cause problems. 2 Mathematical Logistics <span>Once the philosophy has been stripped away, probability theory is simply the study of an object, a probability distribution that assigns values to sets, and the transformations of that object. To be fair, most of pure mathematics also ultimately reduces to studying objects and their transformations! Fortunately, the basic concepts of probability distributions and their manipu




Flashcard 2976863882508

Tags
#french #nouns
Question
After expressions [...] there is no partitive.

I need some money.
Answer
using de

J’ai de l’argent.
J’ai besoin d’argent. (just avoir besoin de + noun)

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
After expressions using de, such as avoir besoin de ( to need), avoir envie de (to desire to want), se passer de (to get along without), there is no partitive. J’ai de l’argent. But: J’ai besoin d’argent

Original toplevel document (pdf)

cannot see any pdfs







Flashcard 2976899796236

Tags
#tmux
Question

list sessions:

[...command line...] 

Answer

tmux ls


statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
list sessions: tmux ls

Original toplevel document

tmux shortcuts &amp; cheatsheet · GitHub
tmux shortcuts & cheatsheet start new: tmux start new with session name: tmux new -s myname attach: tmux a # (or at, or attach) attach to named: tmux a -t myname <span>list sessions: tmux ls kill session: tmux kill-session -t myname Kill all the tmux sessions: tmux ls | grep : | cut -d. -f1 | awk '{print substr($1, 0, length($1)-1)}' | xargs kill In tmux, hit t







February 9, 2017

Played back to back, Carole King's chart entries would run about five straight hours. And those are just her hits – not to mention album tracks, B sides, and the odd flop. King's career as a songwriter is so expansive that it dwarfs even the monster sales figures of her classic 1971 solo juggernaut, Tapestry, which currently tops 25 million and counting.

statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

10 Songs You Didn't Know Carole King Wrote | Rolling Stone
NOW PLAYING 10 Songs You Didn't Know Carole King Wrote By Jordan Runtagh <span>February 9, 2017 Played back to back, Carole King's chart entries would run about five straight hours. And those are just her hits – not to mention album tracks, B sides, and the odd flop. King's career as a songwriter is so expansive that it dwarfs even the monster sales figures of her classic 1971 solo juggernaut, Tapestry, which currently tops 25 million and counting. King was a musical prodigy, selling melodies to New York City publishing companies while she was still in high school. In college she met Gerry Goffin, destined to be her lover and lyr




Flashcard 2977399442700

Question
February 9, 2017

Played back to back, Carole King's chart entries would run about five straight hours. And those are just her hits – not to mention album tracks, B sides, and the odd flop. King's career as a [...]s so expansive that it dwarfs even the monster sales figures of her classic 1971 solo juggernaut, Tapestry, which currently tops 25 million and counting.

Answer
songwriter i

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
pan>February 9, 2017 [emptylink] [emptylink] Played back to back, Carole King's chart entries would run about five straight hours. And those are just her hits – not to mention album tracks, B sides, and the odd flop. King's career as a <span>songwriter is so expansive that it dwarfs even the monster sales figures of her classic 1971 solo juggernaut, Tapestry, which currently tops 25 million and counting. <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

10 Songs You Didn't Know Carole King Wrote | Rolling Stone
NOW PLAYING 10 Songs You Didn't Know Carole King Wrote By Jordan Runtagh <span>February 9, 2017 Played back to back, Carole King's chart entries would run about five straight hours. And those are just her hits – not to mention album tracks, B sides, and the odd flop. King's career as a songwriter is so expansive that it dwarfs even the monster sales figures of her classic 1971 solo juggernaut, Tapestry, which currently tops 25 million and counting. King was a musical prodigy, selling melodies to New York City publishing companies while she was still in high school. In college she met Gerry Goffin, destined to be her lover and lyr







King's hits helped make her the most successful female songwriter — and certainly among the most influential songwriters, period – of the 20th century. In honor of King's 75th birthday, we look beyond her immortal smashes like "You've Got a Friend" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) a Natural Woman" to spotlight 10 tracks you may not have known she had a hand in creating
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

10 Songs You Didn't Know Carole King Wrote | Rolling Stone
lyricist for the next decade. Though the marriage didn't survive, their musical partnership weathered the shifting styles of the Sixties, yielding smashes for teen idols and rock bands, big-haired girl groups and big-voiced R&B legends. <span>King's hits helped make her the most successful female songwriter — and certainly among the most influential songwriters, period – of the 20th century. In honor of King's 75th birthday, we look beyond her immortal smashes like "You've Got a Friend" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) a Natural Woman" to spotlight 10 tracks you may not have known she had a hand in creating. "Take Good Care of My Baby," Bobby Vee (1961)




Flashcard 2977403899148

Question
King's hits helped make her the most successful female songwriter — and certainly among the most influential songwriters, period – of the 20th century. In honor of King's 75th birthday, we look beyond her immortal smashes like "[...]" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) a Natural Woman" to spotlight 10 tracks you may not have known she had a hand in creating
Answer
You've Got a Friend

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
pan>King's hits helped make her the most successful female songwriter — and certainly among the most influential songwriters, period – of the 20th century. In honor of King's 75th birthday, we look beyond her immortal smashes like "You've Got a Friend" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) a Natural Woman" to spotlight 10 tracks you may not have known she had a hand in creating <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

10 Songs You Didn't Know Carole King Wrote | Rolling Stone
lyricist for the next decade. Though the marriage didn't survive, their musical partnership weathered the shifting styles of the Sixties, yielding smashes for teen idols and rock bands, big-haired girl groups and big-voiced R&B legends. <span>King's hits helped make her the most successful female songwriter — and certainly among the most influential songwriters, period – of the 20th century. In honor of King's 75th birthday, we look beyond her immortal smashes like "You've Got a Friend" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) a Natural Woman" to spotlight 10 tracks you may not have known she had a hand in creating. "Take Good Care of My Baby," Bobby Vee (1961)







Flashcard 2977405734156

Question
King's hits helped make her the most successful female songwriter — and certainly among the most influential songwriters, period – of the 20th century. In honor of King's 75th birthday, we look beyond her immortal smashes like "You've Got a Friend" and "([...] to spotlight 10 tracks you may not have known she had a hand in creating
Answer
You Make Me Feel Like) a Natural Woman"

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
the most successful female songwriter — and certainly among the most influential songwriters, period – of the 20th century. In honor of King's 75th birthday, we look beyond her immortal smashes like "You've Got a Friend" and "(<span>You Make Me Feel Like) a Natural Woman" to spotlight 10 tracks you may not have known she had a hand in creating <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

10 Songs You Didn't Know Carole King Wrote | Rolling Stone
lyricist for the next decade. Though the marriage didn't survive, their musical partnership weathered the shifting styles of the Sixties, yielding smashes for teen idols and rock bands, big-haired girl groups and big-voiced R&B legends. <span>King's hits helped make her the most successful female songwriter — and certainly among the most influential songwriters, period – of the 20th century. In honor of King's 75th birthday, we look beyond her immortal smashes like "You've Got a Friend" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) a Natural Woman" to spotlight 10 tracks you may not have known she had a hand in creating. "Take Good Care of My Baby," Bobby Vee (1961)







Flashcard 2977411501324

Question
muscianship
Answer
[demusicianship mjuːˈzɪʃ(ə)nʃɪp / noun noun: musicianship
  1. skill as a musician. "he dazzled the audience with his superb musicianship"
fault - edit me]

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill
Unknown title
ast month Past year Custom range... Customised date range From To All results All results Verbatim About 109,000 results (0.44 seconds) Showing results for define musicianshipSearch instead for define muscianship Search Results Dictionary <span>musicianship mjuːˈzɪʃ(ə)nʃɪp/ noun noun: musicianship skill as a musician. "he dazzled the audience with his superb musicianship" Translate musicianship to Choose language Afrikaans Albanian Amharic Arabic Armenian Azerbaijani Bangla Basque Belarusian Bosnian Bulgarian Burmese Catalan Cebuano Chinese (Simplified)







Vee was a literal replacement for Holly in February 1959. He and his brother, Bill, were set to attend a concert in Moorehead, Minnesota, by the Winter Dance Party package show when Bobby heard the news that its stars, his idol Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper, had died in a plane crash. The brothers and their group rushed to offer their services, stopping only to buy angora sweaters for their stage outfits. They duly performed as the Shadows, appearing immediately after a spoken tribute to Buddy from his bass player, the future country music star Waylon Jennings.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Bobby Vee obituary | Music | The Guardian
ic history, the resulting vacuum was filled by “the Bobbys”, younger performers whose looks were more important than their singing. Foremost among these, but with better songs and musicianship than most, was Bobby Vee, who has died aged 73. <span>Vee was a literal replacement for Holly in February 1959. He and his brother, Bill, were set to attend a concert in Moorehead, Minnesota, by the Winter Dance Party package show when Bobby heard the news that its stars, his idol Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper, had died in a plane crash. The brothers and their group rushed to offer their services, stopping only to buy angora sweaters for their stage outfits. They duly performed as the Shadows, appearing immediately after a spoken tribute to Buddy from his bass player, the future country music star Waylon Jennings.




Flashcard 2977418579212

Question
Vee was a literal replacement for [...]n February 1959. He and his brother, Bill, were set to attend a concert in Moorehead, Minnesota, by the Winter Dance Party package show when Bobby heard the news that its stars, his idol Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper, had died in a plane crash. The brothers and their group rushed to offer their services, stopping only to buy angora sweaters for their stage outfits. They duly performed as the Shadows, appearing immediately after a spoken tribute to Buddy from his bass player, the future country music star Waylon Jennings.
Answer
Holly i

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
Vee was a literal replacement for Holly in February 1959. He and his brother, Bill, were set to attend a concert in Moorehead, Minnesota, by the Winter Dance Party package show when Bobby heard the news that its stars, his idol

Original toplevel document

Bobby Vee obituary | Music | The Guardian
ic history, the resulting vacuum was filled by “the Bobbys”, younger performers whose looks were more important than their singing. Foremost among these, but with better songs and musicianship than most, was Bobby Vee, who has died aged 73. <span>Vee was a literal replacement for Holly in February 1959. He and his brother, Bill, were set to attend a concert in Moorehead, Minnesota, by the Winter Dance Party package show when Bobby heard the news that its stars, his idol Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper, had died in a plane crash. The brothers and their group rushed to offer their services, stopping only to buy angora sweaters for their stage outfits. They duly performed as the Shadows, appearing immediately after a spoken tribute to Buddy from his bass player, the future country music star Waylon Jennings.







Flashcard 2977420414220

Question
Vee was a literal replacement for Holly in February 1959. He and his brother, Bill, were set to attend a concert in Moorehead, Minnesota, by the Winter Dance Party package show when Bobby heard the news that its stars, his idol Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper, had died in a plane crash. The brothers and their group rushed to offer their [...] stopping only to buy angora sweaters for their stage outfits. They duly performed as the Shadows, appearing immediately after a spoken tribute to Buddy from his bass player, the future country music star Waylon Jennings.
Answer
services,

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
concert in Moorehead, Minnesota, by the Winter Dance Party package show when Bobby heard the news that its stars, his idol Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper, had died in a plane crash. The brothers and their group rushed to offer their <span>services, stopping only to buy angora sweaters for their stage outfits. They duly performed as the Shadows, appearing immediately after a spoken tribute to Buddy from his bass player, the future

Original toplevel document

Bobby Vee obituary | Music | The Guardian
ic history, the resulting vacuum was filled by “the Bobbys”, younger performers whose looks were more important than their singing. Foremost among these, but with better songs and musicianship than most, was Bobby Vee, who has died aged 73. <span>Vee was a literal replacement for Holly in February 1959. He and his brother, Bill, were set to attend a concert in Moorehead, Minnesota, by the Winter Dance Party package show when Bobby heard the news that its stars, his idol Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper, had died in a plane crash. The brothers and their group rushed to offer their services, stopping only to buy angora sweaters for their stage outfits. They duly performed as the Shadows, appearing immediately after a spoken tribute to Buddy from his bass player, the future country music star Waylon Jennings.







Automotive

1969 “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Share this:
  • Print
  • Cite

    Article Details:

    “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver

    • Author

      History.com Staff

    • Website Name

      History.com

    • Year Published

      2009

    • Title

      “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver

    • URL

      http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/winning-released-stars-paul-newman-as-a-race-car-driver

    • Access Date

      May 22, 2018

    • Publisher

      A+E Networks

On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “Winning.”

By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, Joanne Woodward

statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

“Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver - May 22, 1969 - HISTORY.com
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 prev next <span>Automotive 1969 “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Share this: facebook twitter google+ Print Cite Article Details: “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Author History.com Staff Website Name History.com Year Published 2009 Title “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver URL http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/winning-released-stars-paul-newman-as-a-race-car-driver Access Date May 22, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “Winning.” By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, Joanne Woodward) to his biggest rival, Luther Erding (Robert Wagner). Newman and Wagner attended racing school to prepare for their action scenes, and Newman reportedly performed many of the racing sce




Flashcard 2977432997132

Question

Automotive

1969 “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Share this:
  • Print
  • Cite

    Article Details:

    “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver

    • Author

      History.com Staff

    • Website Name

      History.com

    • Year Published

      2009

    • Title

      “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver

    • URL

      http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/winning-released-stars-paul-newman-as-a-race-car-driver

    • Access Date

      May 22, 2018

    • Publisher

      A+E Networks

On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “[...]

By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, Joanne Woodward

Answer
Winning.”

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
an-as-a-race-car-driver Access Date May 22, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “<span>Winning.” By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same y

Original toplevel document

“Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver - May 22, 1969 - HISTORY.com
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 prev next <span>Automotive 1969 “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Share this: facebook twitter google+ Print Cite Article Details: “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Author History.com Staff Website Name History.com Year Published 2009 Title “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver URL http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/winning-released-stars-paul-newman-as-a-race-car-driver Access Date May 22, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “Winning.” By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, Joanne Woodward) to his biggest rival, Luther Erding (Robert Wagner). Newman and Wagner attended racing school to prepare for their action scenes, and Newman reportedly performed many of the racing sce







Flashcard 2977434569996

Question

Automotive

1969 “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Share this:
  • Print
  • Cite

    Article Details:

    “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver

    • Author

      History.com Staff

    • Website Name

      History.com

    • Year Published

      2009

    • Title

      “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver

    • URL

      http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/winning-released-stars-paul-newman-as-a-race-car-driver

    • Access Date

      May 22, 2018

    • Publisher

      A+E Networks

On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “Winning.”

By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by [...]—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, Joanne Woodward

Answer
winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by <span>winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, Joanne Woodward <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

“Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver - May 22, 1969 - HISTORY.com
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 prev next <span>Automotive 1969 “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Share this: facebook twitter google+ Print Cite Article Details: “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Author History.com Staff Website Name History.com Year Published 2009 Title “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver URL http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/winning-released-stars-paul-newman-as-a-race-car-driver Access Date May 22, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “Winning.” By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, Joanne Woodward) to his biggest rival, Luther Erding (Robert Wagner). Newman and Wagner attended racing school to prepare for their action scenes, and Newman reportedly performed many of the racing sce







Flashcard 2977436142860

Question

Automotive

1969 “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Share this:
  • Print
  • Cite

    Article Details:

    “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver

    • Author

      History.com Staff

    • Website Name

      History.com

    • Year Published

      2009

    • Title

      “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver

    • URL

      http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/winning-released-stars-paul-newman-as-a-race-car-driver

    • Access Date

      May 22, 2018

    • Publisher

      A+E Networks

On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “Winning.”

By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, [...]

Answer

Joanne Woodward


statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
n “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, <span>Joanne Woodward <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

“Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver - May 22, 1969 - HISTORY.com
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 prev next <span>Automotive 1969 “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Share this: facebook twitter google+ Print Cite Article Details: “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver Author History.com Staff Website Name History.com Year Published 2009 Title “Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver URL http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/winning-released-stars-paul-newman-as-a-race-car-driver Access Date May 22, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks On this day in 1969, the legendary actor, philanthropist and automobile enthusiast Paul Newman makes his onscreen racing debut in the action-drama film “Winning.” By the time he made “Winning,” the blue-eyed Newman was already famous for his performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1960), “Hud” (1962) and “Cool Hand Luke” (1967). The same year “Winning” was released, Newman paired with Robert Redford in the blockbuster hit “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” In “Winning,” Newman played Frank Capua, a struggling race car driver who must turn around his fortunes by winning the biggest race of them all—the Indianapolis 500—and in the process avoid losing his wife (played by Newman’s real-life spouse, Joanne Woodward) to his biggest rival, Luther Erding (Robert Wagner). Newman and Wagner attended racing school to prepare for their action scenes, and Newman reportedly performed many of the racing sce







With the car magnate Carl Haas, Newman co-founded a racing team (now known as Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing) that would compile a record of more than 100 wins on the Indy racing circuit from 1983 to 2008
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

“Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver - May 22, 1969 - HISTORY.com
sche 935. In 1980, Newman talked to Sports Illustrated about his entry into racing after “Winning”: “I found I had enjoyed the precision of it, of controlling those cars… I could see it would be a gas to do something like that really well.” <span>With the car magnate Carl Haas, Newman co-founded a racing team (now known as Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing) that would compile a record of more than 100 wins on the Indy racing circuit from 1983 to 2008. Newman also remained an active competitor in endurance racing, making his last start in 2006 in the Rolex 24 at Daytona International Speedway. In addition to his acting and racing pro




Flashcard 2977439288588

Question
With the car magnate Carl Haas, Newman co-founded [...]) that would compile a record of more than 100 wins on the Indy racing circuit from 1983 to 2008
Answer
a racing team (now known as Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
With the car magnate Carl Haas, Newman co-founded a racing team (now known as Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing) that would compile a record of more than 100 wins on the Indy racing circuit from 1983 to 2008

Original toplevel document

“Winning” released, stars Paul Newman as a race car driver - May 22, 1969 - HISTORY.com
sche 935. In 1980, Newman talked to Sports Illustrated about his entry into racing after “Winning”: “I found I had enjoyed the precision of it, of controlling those cars… I could see it would be a gas to do something like that really well.” <span>With the car magnate Carl Haas, Newman co-founded a racing team (now known as Newman/Haas/Lanigan Racing) that would compile a record of more than 100 wins on the Indy racing circuit from 1983 to 2008. Newman also remained an active competitor in endurance racing, making his last start in 2006 in the Rolex 24 at Daytona International Speedway. In addition to his acting and racing pro







President Jimmy Carter, in a speech delivered at Notre Dame University, reaffirms his commitment to human rights as a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy and disparages the “inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Jimmy Carter reaffirms his commitment to human rights - May 22, 1977 - HISTORY.com
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/jimmy-carter-reaffirms-his-commitment-to-human-rights Access Date May 23, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks <span>President Jimmy Carter, in a speech delivered at Notre Dame University, reaffirms his commitment to human rights as a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy and disparages the “inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear.” Carter’s speech marked a new direction for U.S. Cold War policy, one that led to both accolades and controversy. Jimmy Carter was elected president in 1976, during a time when America




Flashcard 2977444269324

Question
President Jimmy Carter, in a speech delivered at Notre Dame University, reaffirms his commitment to human rights as a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy and disparages the “inordinate fear of [...] which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear.
Answer
communism

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
President Jimmy Carter, in a speech delivered at Notre Dame University, reaffirms his commitment to human rights as a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy and disparages the “inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear.

Original toplevel document

Jimmy Carter reaffirms his commitment to human rights - May 22, 1977 - HISTORY.com
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/jimmy-carter-reaffirms-his-commitment-to-human-rights Access Date May 23, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks <span>President Jimmy Carter, in a speech delivered at Notre Dame University, reaffirms his commitment to human rights as a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy and disparages the “inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear.” Carter’s speech marked a new direction for U.S. Cold War policy, one that led to both accolades and controversy. Jimmy Carter was elected president in 1976, during a time when America







Flashcard 2977445842188

Question
President Jimmy Carter, in a speech delivered at Notre Dame University, reaffirms his commitment to human rights as a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy and disparages the “inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any [...] who joined us in that fear.
Answer
dictator

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
n>President Jimmy Carter, in a speech delivered at Notre Dame University, reaffirms his commitment to human rights as a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy and disparages the “inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear. <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

Jimmy Carter reaffirms his commitment to human rights - May 22, 1977 - HISTORY.com
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/jimmy-carter-reaffirms-his-commitment-to-human-rights Access Date May 23, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks <span>President Jimmy Carter, in a speech delivered at Notre Dame University, reaffirms his commitment to human rights as a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy and disparages the “inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear.” Carter’s speech marked a new direction for U.S. Cold War policy, one that led to both accolades and controversy. Jimmy Carter was elected president in 1976, during a time when America







Ronald Reagan, in his successful 1980 presidential campaign against Carter, constantly reiterated his theme that his opponent’s policies had severely weakened America in its struggle against the Soviet Union.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Jimmy Carter reaffirms his commitment to human rights - May 22, 1977 - HISTORY.com
e dictators Anastacio Somoza of Nicaragua and the Shah of Iran fell from power in 1979, critics of Carter’s human rights policy blamed the president for the demise of two governments, which had been strong allies in the war against communism. <span>Ronald Reagan, in his successful 1980 presidential campaign against Carter, constantly reiterated his theme that his opponent’s policies had severely weakened America in its struggle against the Soviet Union. Fact Check We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn't look right, contact us!




Flashcard 2977448987916

Question
Ronald Reagan, in his successful 1980 presidential campaign against Carter, constantly reiterated his theme that his opponent’s policies had severely [...]
Answer
weakened America in its struggle against the Soviet Union.

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
Ronald Reagan, in his successful 1980 presidential campaign against Carter, constantly reiterated his theme that his opponent’s policies had severely weakened America in its struggle against the Soviet Union.

Original toplevel document

Jimmy Carter reaffirms his commitment to human rights - May 22, 1977 - HISTORY.com
e dictators Anastacio Somoza of Nicaragua and the Shah of Iran fell from power in 1979, critics of Carter’s human rights policy blamed the president for the demise of two governments, which had been strong allies in the war against communism. <span>Ronald Reagan, in his successful 1980 presidential campaign against Carter, constantly reiterated his theme that his opponent’s policies had severely weakened America in its struggle against the Soviet Union. Fact Check We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn't look right, contact us!







Like her husband, Martha Washington was born in the American colonies as a British subject (1731). The petite, dark-haired 19 year old married her first husband, a prosperous 39-year-old Virginia planter named Daniel Parke Custis in 1750. The couple resided in a mansion called the White House and, after Custis died in 1757, Martha ran the plantation, aided by her innate business sense
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
22, 1802 - HISTORY.com history.com President George Washington’s devoted widow and the nation’s first first lady, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington, dies at her Mt. Vernon home on this day in 1802. She was 70 years old. <span>Like her husband, Martha Washington was born in the American colonies as a British subject (1731). The petite, dark-haired 19 year old married her first husband, a prosperous 39-year-old Virginia planter named Daniel Parke Custis in 1750. The couple resided in a mansion called the White House and, after Custis died in 1757, Martha ran the plantation, aided by her innate business sense. Two years later, Martha, then 26 and a wealthy and socially prominent widow with two children, met George Washington. At the time, George was a colonel in the British army, a veteran o




Flashcard 2977453968652

Question
Like her husband, Martha Washington was born in the American colonies as a British subject (1731). The petite, dark-haired 19 year old married her first husband, a prosperous 39-year-old Virginia planter named Daniel Parke Custis in 1750. The couple resided in a mansion called the White House and, after Custis died in 1757, Martha ran the [...] aided by her innate business sense
Answer
plantation,

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
The petite, dark-haired 19 year old married her first husband, a prosperous 39-year-old Virginia planter named Daniel Parke Custis in 1750. The couple resided in a mansion called the White House and, after Custis died in 1757, Martha ran the <span>plantation, aided by her innate business sense <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
22, 1802 - HISTORY.com history.com President George Washington’s devoted widow and the nation’s first first lady, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington, dies at her Mt. Vernon home on this day in 1802. She was 70 years old. <span>Like her husband, Martha Washington was born in the American colonies as a British subject (1731). The petite, dark-haired 19 year old married her first husband, a prosperous 39-year-old Virginia planter named Daniel Parke Custis in 1750. The couple resided in a mansion called the White House and, after Custis died in 1757, Martha ran the plantation, aided by her innate business sense. Two years later, Martha, then 26 and a wealthy and socially prominent widow with two children, met George Washington. At the time, George was a colonel in the British army, a veteran o







Flashcard 2977455541516

Question
Like her husband, Martha Washington was born in the American colonies as a British subject (1731). The petite, dark-haired 19 year old married her first husband, a prosperous 39-year-old Virginia planter named Daniel Parke Custis in 1750. The couple resided in a mansion called the [...] and, after Custis died in 1757, Martha ran the plantation, aided by her innate business sense
Answer
White House

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
born in the American colonies as a British subject (1731). The petite, dark-haired 19 year old married her first husband, a prosperous 39-year-old Virginia planter named Daniel Parke Custis in 1750. The couple resided in a mansion called the <span>White House and, after Custis died in 1757, Martha ran the plantation, aided by her innate business sense <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
22, 1802 - HISTORY.com history.com President George Washington’s devoted widow and the nation’s first first lady, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington, dies at her Mt. Vernon home on this day in 1802. She was 70 years old. <span>Like her husband, Martha Washington was born in the American colonies as a British subject (1731). The petite, dark-haired 19 year old married her first husband, a prosperous 39-year-old Virginia planter named Daniel Parke Custis in 1750. The couple resided in a mansion called the White House and, after Custis died in 1757, Martha ran the plantation, aided by her innate business sense. Two years later, Martha, then 26 and a wealthy and socially prominent widow with two children, met George Washington. At the time, George was a colonel in the British army, a veteran o







. During the war, while George led the Continental Army, she frequently followed him to military encampments to take care of him and urge the local women to help feed, clothe and tend to the soldiers.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
have been sterile–George adopted Martha’s children as his own. Before the American Revolution began in 1776, Martha helped to run two households–Mt. Vernon and the estate she inherited from Custis–with an enormous staff of slaves and servants<span>. During the war, while George led the Continental Army, she frequently followed him to military encampments to take care of him and urge the local women to help feed, clothe and tend to the soldiers. In 1789, George was elected the first president of the United States and the 57-year-old Martha struggled to fill a role for which she had no model. She shunned the spotlight and rese




Flashcard 2977460260108

Question
. During the war, while George led the Continental Army, she frequently followed him to military encampments to [...] and urge the local women to help feed, clothe and tend to the soldiers.
Answer
take care of him

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
. During the war, while George led the Continental Army, she frequently followed him to military encampments to take care of him and urge the local women to help feed, clothe and tend to the soldiers.

Original toplevel document

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
have been sterile–George adopted Martha’s children as his own. Before the American Revolution began in 1776, Martha helped to run two households–Mt. Vernon and the estate she inherited from Custis–with an enormous staff of slaves and servants<span>. During the war, while George led the Continental Army, she frequently followed him to military encampments to take care of him and urge the local women to help feed, clothe and tend to the soldiers. In 1789, George was elected the first president of the United States and the 57-year-old Martha struggled to fill a role for which she had no model. She shunned the spotlight and rese







She shunned the spotlight and resented having her every move being restricted by advisors and documented by the press marth washington
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
to take care of him and urge the local women to help feed, clothe and tend to the soldiers. In 1789, George was elected the first president of the United States and the 57-year-old Martha struggled to fill a role for which she had no model. <span>She shunned the spotlight and resented having her every move being restricted by advisors and documented by the press. Forbidden from dining in private homes with friends, the Washingtons held regular formal dinner parties and receptions at the presidential mansions, first in New York and then in Phila




Flashcard 2977465765132

Question
She shunned the spotlight and resented having her every [...]
Answer
move being restricted by advisors and documented by the press marth washington

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
She shunned the spotlight and resented having her every move being restricted by advisors and documented by the press marth washington

Original toplevel document

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
to take care of him and urge the local women to help feed, clothe and tend to the soldiers. In 1789, George was elected the first president of the United States and the 57-year-old Martha struggled to fill a role for which she had no model. <span>She shunned the spotlight and resented having her every move being restricted by advisors and documented by the press. Forbidden from dining in private homes with friends, the Washingtons held regular formal dinner parties and receptions at the presidential mansions, first in New York and then in Phila







At that time, the term first lady was not in popular use and Martha was referred to affectionately as Lady Washington.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
nds, the Washingtons held regular formal dinner parties and receptions at the presidential mansions, first in New York and then in Philadelphia. She disliked both cities and looked forward to returning to Mt. Vernon upon George’s retirement. <span>At that time, the term first lady was not in popular use and Martha was referred to affectionately as Lady Washington. Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed fro




Flashcard 2977470483724

Question
At that time, the term first lady was not in popular use and Martha was referred to affectionately as [...]
Answer
Lady Washington.

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
At that time, the term first lady was not in popular use and Martha was referred to affectionately as Lady Washington.

Original toplevel document

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
nds, the Washingtons held regular formal dinner parties and receptions at the presidential mansions, first in New York and then in Philadelphia. She disliked both cities and looked forward to returning to Mt. Vernon upon George’s retirement. <span>At that time, the term first lady was not in popular use and Martha was referred to affectionately as Lady Washington. Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed fro







Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed from his tongue in 1789, she personally nursed him back to health and ordered that the streets around their house be cordoned off so that he could convalesce without being disturbed by the sounds of rattling carriages .
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
d then in Philadelphia. She disliked both cities and looked forward to returning to Mt. Vernon upon George’s retirement. At that time, the term first lady was not in popular use and Martha was referred to affectionately as Lady Washington. <span>Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed from his tongue in 1789, she personally nursed him back to health and ordered that the streets around their house be cordoned off so that he could convalesce without being disturbed by the sounds of rattling carriages. Despite her doting, Martha may not have been the great passion of George’s life. Before their marriage, George had fallen in love with Sally Fairfax, the wife of an old friend, and som




Flashcard 2977475202316

Question
Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a [...] removed from his tongue in 1789, she personally nursed him back to health and ordered that the streets around their house be cordoned off so that he could convalesce without being disturbed by the sounds of rattling carriages .
Answer
cancerous growth

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed from his tongue in 1789, she personally nursed him back to health and ordered that the streets around their house be cordoned off so that he could convalesce without being distu

Original toplevel document

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
d then in Philadelphia. She disliked both cities and looked forward to returning to Mt. Vernon upon George’s retirement. At that time, the term first lady was not in popular use and Martha was referred to affectionately as Lady Washington. <span>Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed from his tongue in 1789, she personally nursed him back to health and ordered that the streets around their house be cordoned off so that he could convalesce without being disturbed by the sounds of rattling carriages. Despite her doting, Martha may not have been the great passion of George’s life. Before their marriage, George had fallen in love with Sally Fairfax, the wife of an old friend, and som







Flashcard 2977476775180

Question
Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed from his tongue in 1789, she personally nursed him back to health and ordered that the streets around their house be cordoned off so t[...]
Answer
hat he could convalesce without being disturbed by the sounds of rattling carriages .

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
ose. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed from his tongue in 1789, she personally nursed him back to health and ordered that the streets around their house be cordoned off so t<span>hat he could convalesce without being disturbed by the sounds of rattling carriages . <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

Martha Washington dies - May 22, 1802 - HISTORY.com
d then in Philadelphia. She disliked both cities and looked forward to returning to Mt. Vernon upon George’s retirement. At that time, the term first lady was not in popular use and Martha was referred to affectionately as Lady Washington. <span>Friends and acquaintances observed that George and Martha were very close. She considered her primary job to be taking care of her husband. When he had a cancerous growth removed from his tongue in 1789, she personally nursed him back to health and ordered that the streets around their house be cordoned off so that he could convalesce without being disturbed by the sounds of rattling carriages. Despite her doting, Martha may not have been the great passion of George’s life. Before their marriage, George had fallen in love with Sally Fairfax, the wife of an old friend, and som







After 150 years apart, Marxist South Yemen and conservative North Yemen are unified as the Republic of Yemen. Ali Abdullah, president of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
e Yemen united URL http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/yemen-united Access Date May 23, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks <span>After 150 years apart, Marxist South Yemen and conservative North Yemen are unified as the Republic of Yemen. Ali Abdullah, president of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993. Situated at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, Yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, bu




Flashcard 2977482018060

Question
After 150 years apart, [...] South Yemen and conservative North Yemen are unified as the Republic of Yemen. Ali Abdullah, president of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993.
Answer
Marxist

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
After 150 years apart, Marxist South Yemen and conservative North Yemen are unified as the Republic of Yemen. Ali Abdullah, president of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader

Original toplevel document

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
e Yemen united URL http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/yemen-united Access Date May 23, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks <span>After 150 years apart, Marxist South Yemen and conservative North Yemen are unified as the Republic of Yemen. Ali Abdullah, president of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993. Situated at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, Yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, bu







Flashcard 2977483590924

Question
After 150 years apart, Marxist South Yemen and conservative North Yemen are unified as the Republic of Yemen. Ali Abdullah, president of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in [...].
Answer
1993

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
Yemen are unified as the Republic of Yemen. Ali Abdullah, president of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in <span>1993. <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
e Yemen united URL http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/yemen-united Access Date May 23, 2018 Publisher A+E Networks <span>After 150 years apart, Marxist South Yemen and conservative North Yemen are unified as the Republic of Yemen. Ali Abdullah, president of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993. Situated at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, Yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, bu







yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
sident of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993. Situated at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, Y<span>emen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established. The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionist




Flashcard 2977492241676

Question
yemen was divided between the [...] in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established.
Answer
British and the Ottomans

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state,

Original toplevel document

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
sident of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993. Situated at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, Y<span>emen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established. The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionist







Flashcard 2977493814540

Question
yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The [...] were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established.
Answer
Turks

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yeme

Original toplevel document

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
sident of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993. Situated at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, Y<span>emen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established. The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionist







Flashcard 2977495387404

Question
yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only [...]
Answer
Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established.

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
yemen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established. <html>

Original toplevel document

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
sident of North Yemen, became the new country’s president, and Ali Salem Al-Baidh, leader of the South Yemeni Socialist Party, vice president. The first free elections were held in 1993. Situated at the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, Y<span>emen was divided between the British and the Ottomans in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established. The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionist







The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionists and Yemen’s northern-based government temporarily dissolved the Yemeni union. Free elections resumed in 1997.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
ns in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established. <span>The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionists and Yemen’s northern-based government temporarily dissolved the Yemeni union. Free elections resumed in 1997. Fact Check We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn't look right, contact us!




Flashcard 2977500105996

Question
The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the [...], and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionists and Yemen’s northern-based government temporarily dissolved the Yemeni union. Free elections resumed in 1997.
Answer
brink of collapse

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionists and Yemen’s northern-based government temporarily dissolved the Yemeni union. Free elections resumed in 1997. </bo

Original toplevel document

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
ns in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established. <span>The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionists and Yemen’s northern-based government temporarily dissolved the Yemeni union. Free elections resumed in 1997. Fact Check We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn't look right, contact us!







Flashcard 2977501678860

Question
The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a [...] in 1994 between southern secessionists and Yemen’s northern-based government temporarily dissolved the Yemeni union. Free elections resumed in 1997.
Answer
civil war

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionists and Yemen’s northern-based government temporarily dissolved the Yemeni union. Free elections resumed in 1997.

Original toplevel document

Yemen united - May 22, 1990 - HISTORY.com
ns in the mid-19th century. The Turks were expelled from the north in 1918, but the British continued to dominate the south until 1967, when the Arab world’s first and only Marxist state, the People’s Republic of South Yemen, was established. <span>The unification of Yemen in 1990 did not go as smoothly as hoped; economic troubles in 1991 brought Yemen to the brink of collapse, and a civil war in 1994 between southern secessionists and Yemen’s northern-based government temporarily dissolved the Yemeni union. Free elections resumed in 1997. Fact Check We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn't look right, contact us!







On December 15, 1913, Muriel Rukeyser was born in New York City. She attended Vassar College for two years and then moved back to New York where she took classes at Columbia University. Her first collection of poems, Theory of Flight, won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition in 1935.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Muriel Rukeyser - Poet | Academy of American Poets
ry Tags: NEA Fellow Texts by this Poet: The Life of Poetry, Chapter 1 browse all texts Texts about this Poet: Brooks, H. D., and Rukeyser: Three Women Poets in the First Century of World Wars <span>On December 15, 1913, Muriel Rukeyser was born in New York City. She attended Vassar College for two years and then moved back to New York where she took classes at Columbia University. Her first collection of poems, Theory of Flight, won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition in 1935. Her subsequent books of poetry would be inspired by certain events she witnessed, including the Scottsboro trial in Alabama, the Gauley Bridge tragedy in West Virginia, and the civil wa




Flashcard 2977506921740

Question
On December 15, 1913, [...] was born in New York City. She attended Vassar College for two years and then moved back to New York where she took classes at Columbia University. Her first collection of poems, Theory of Flight, won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition in 1935.
Answer
Muriel Rukeyser

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
On December 15, 1913, Muriel Rukeyser was born in New York City. She attended Vassar College for two years and then moved back to New York where she took classes at Columbia University. Her first collection of poems, Theor

Original toplevel document

Muriel Rukeyser - Poet | Academy of American Poets
ry Tags: NEA Fellow Texts by this Poet: The Life of Poetry, Chapter 1 browse all texts Texts about this Poet: Brooks, H. D., and Rukeyser: Three Women Poets in the First Century of World Wars <span>On December 15, 1913, Muriel Rukeyser was born in New York City. She attended Vassar College for two years and then moved back to New York where she took classes at Columbia University. Her first collection of poems, Theory of Flight, won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition in 1935. Her subsequent books of poetry would be inspired by certain events she witnessed, including the Scottsboro trial in Alabama, the Gauley Bridge tragedy in West Virginia, and the civil wa







the universe is made of stories, not of atoms. Muriel Rukeyser
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Muriel Rukeyser Quotes - BrainyQuote
anguage Español Français About About Us Privacy Terms Muriel Rukeyser Quotes American - Poet December 15, 1913 - February 12, 1980 [imagelink] <span>The universe is made of stories, not of atoms. Muriel Rukeyser Science, Made, Stories Nourish beginnings, let us nourish beginnings. Not all things are blest, but the seeds of all things are blest. The b




Flashcard 2977513213196

Question
the universe is made of stories, not of atoms. [...]
Answer
Muriel Rukeyser

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
the universe is made of stories, not of atoms. Muriel Rukeyser

Original toplevel document

Muriel Rukeyser Quotes - BrainyQuote
anguage Español Français About About Us Privacy Terms Muriel Rukeyser Quotes American - Poet December 15, 1913 - February 12, 1980 [imagelink] <span>The universe is made of stories, not of atoms. Muriel Rukeyser Science, Made, Stories Nourish beginnings, let us nourish beginnings. Not all things are blest, but the seeds of all things are blest. The b







At university when he was 19, Gauss discovered a heptadecagon, or a 17-sided polygon.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




Regular saunas are also associated with a significant reduction in stroke risk.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




Flashcard 2977525796108

Question
Regular saunas are also associated with a significant reduction in [...]
Answer
stroke risk.

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Open it
Regular saunas are also associated with a significant reduction in stroke risk.







Staying well hydrated probably helps tea drinkers stay trim, too. Scientists have discovered that people who drink more water are consistently more satisfied and eat fewer calories on a daily basis. For those benefits, it doesn't really matterwhether you hydrate with water, coffee, or tea, according to the medical myth busters at the BBC.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




Flashcard 2977528679692

Question
Staying well hydrated probably helps tea drinkers stay trim, too. Scientists have discovered that people who drink more water are consistently more [...] those benefits, it doesn't really matterwhether you hydrate with water, coffee, or tea, according to the medical myth busters at the BBC.
Answer
satisfied and eat fewer calories on a daily basis. For

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Open it
Staying well hydrated probably helps tea drinkers stay trim, too. Scientists have discovered that people who drink more water are consistently more satisfied and eat fewer calories on a daily basis. For those benefits, it doesn't really matterwhether you hydrate with water, coffee, or tea, according to the medical myth busters at the BBC.







Flashcard 2977530252556

Question
Staying well hydrated probably helps tea drinkers stay trim, too. Scientists have discovered that people who drink more water are consistently more satisfied and eat fewer calories on a daily basis. For those benefits, it doesn't really matterwhether you [...]ccording to the medical myth busters at the BBC.
Answer
hydrate with water, coffee, or tea, a

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Open it
hydrated probably helps tea drinkers stay trim, too. Scientists have discovered that people who drink more water are consistently more satisfied and eat fewer calories on a daily basis. For those benefits, it doesn't really matterwhether you <span>hydrate with water, coffee, or tea, according to the medical myth busters at the BBC. <span><body><html>







#betancourt #probability-theory
A function also induces a mapping from sets in the input space, X X X , to sets in the output space, Y Y Y , by applying the function to each individual element in the input set,
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
Such sets are always well defined even if the function does not have a unique inverse – we just add all of the possible inverses to f − 1 ( B ) f−1(B) f^{-1}(B) . This set is denoted the preimage of the set B B B .
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
Many spaces are equipped with structures that define natural σ σ \sigma -algebras.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
In particular, all of the spaces that we typically deal with in practical problems, such as the integers and the real numbers, have natural σ σ \sigma -algebras. Consequently we don’t have to spend any time worrying about explicitly constructing a σ σ \sigma -algebra in practice, and the restriction of the power set to a σ σ \sigma -algebra has little impact on the practical use of probability theory.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
Although superficially similar, a topology is distinct from a σ σ \sigma -algebra. For example, the topologically open sets are not closed under the complement operation. If we combine all of the topologically open sets and topologically closed sets defined by a topology, however, then we get a proper σ σ \sigma -algebra. σ σ \sigma -algebras constructed from the topology of a space are denoted Borel σ σ \sigma -algebras (Folland 1999) . Because common spaces have natural topologies they consequently also have natural Borel σ σ \sigma -algebras that exclude pathological sets that can cause problems.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#modeling
In statistics, given an observable variable X and a target variable Y, a generative model is a statistical model of the conditional probability of the observable X, given a target y; symbolically, \({\displaystyle P(X|Y=y)}\), while a discriminative model is a model of the conditional probability of the target Y, given an observation x; symbolically, \({\displaystyle P(Y|X=x)}\). The terminology is because given a target, a generative model models the probability of observations, and can be used to "generate" random instances (outcomes) of observations x,[1] while a discriminative model can be used to "discriminate" (distinguish) the value of the target variable Y, given an observation x.[2] These terms are particularly used in statistical classification (including machine learning), where classifiers can be based on a model: a classifier based on a generative model is a generative classifier, while a classifier based on a discriminative model is a discriminative classifier. Standard examples of each are a naive Bayes classifier as a generative classifier, and logistic regression as a discriminative model, used for classification.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Generative model - Wikipedia
Generative model - Wikipedia Generative model From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search In statistics, given an observable variable X and a target variable Y, a generative model is a statistical model of the conditional probability of the observable X, given a target y; symbolically, P ( X | Y = y ) {\displaystyle P(X|Y=y)} , while a discriminative model is a model of the conditional probability of the target Y, given an observation x; symbolically, P ( Y | X = x ) {\displaystyle P(Y|X=x)} . The terminology is because given a target, a generative model models the probability of observations, and can be used to "generate" random instances (outcomes) of observations x, [1] while a discriminative model can be used to "discriminate" (distinguish) the value of the target variable Y, given an observation x. [2] These terms are particularly used in statistical classification (including machine learning), where classifiers can be based on a model: a classifier based on a generative model is a generative classifier, while a classifier based on a discriminative model is a discriminative classifier. Standard examples of each are a naive Bayes classifier as a generative classifier, and logistic regression as a discriminative model, used for classification. In application to classification, the observable X is frequently a continuous variable, the target Y is generally a discrete variable consisting of a finite set of labels, and the con




#betancourt #probability-theory
From an abstract perspective, probability is a positive, conserved quantity which we want to distribute across a space, X X X .
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
If we want to distribute probability across spaces with an infinite number of subsets, such as the real numbers, however, then we need to go a bit further and require self-consistency over any countable collection of disjoint sets,
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Probability Theory (For Scientists and Engineers)
well-defined subsets of XX, we conserve probability. For a finite collection of sets this self-consistency property is known as finite additivity and would be sufficient if there were only a finite number of well-defined subsets in XX. <span>If we want to distribute probability across spaces with an infinite number of subsets, such as the real numbers, however, then we need to go a bit further and require self-consistency over any countable collection of disjoint sets, ℙπ[∪∞n=1An]=∑n=1∞ℙπ[An].Pπ[∪n=1∞An]=∑n=1∞Pπ[An]. In particular, this countable additivity property allows us to cover complex neighborhoods, such as that enclosed by a smooth surface,




#betancourt #probability-theory
When our space is a subset of the real line, X ⊆ ℝ X⊆R X \subseteq \mathbb{R} , there is a natural embedding of X X X into ℝ R \mathbb{R} , ι : X x → ↦ ℝ x .
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
In order for f f f to induce a probability distribution on Y Y Y we need the two σ σ \sigma -algebras to be compatible in some sense.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
In particular we need every subset B ∈  B∈Y B \in \mathcal{Y} to correspond to a unique subset f − 1 ( B ) ∈  f−1(B)∈X f^{-1}(B) \in \mathcal{X} . If this holds for all subsets in  Y \mathcal{Y} then we say that the transformation f f f is measurable and we can define a pushforward distribution, π ∗ π∗ \pi_{*} by ℙ π ∗ [ B ] = ℙ π [ f − 1 ( B ) ] .
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
Let ϖ : X → Y ϖ:X→Y \varpi: X \rightarrow Y be a projection operator that maps points in a space X X X to points in the subspace Y ⊂ X Y⊂X Y \subset X . It turns out that in this case a σ σ \sigma -algebra on X X X naturally defines a σ σ \sigma -algebra on Y Y Y and the projection operator is measurable with respect to this choice. Consequently any joint probability distribution on X X X will transform into a unique marginal probability distribution on Y Y Y
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
Can we take a given marginal probability distribution on a subspace and construct a joint probability distribution on the total space that projects back to the marginal? We can if we can define an appropriate probability distribution on the complement of the given subspace.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Probability Theory (For Scientists and Engineers)
ility Distributions As we saw in Section 2.4, projection operators allow us to transform a probability distribution over a space to a probability distribution on some lower-dimensional subspace. Is it possible, however, to go the other way? <span>Can we take a given marginal probability distribution on a subspace and construct a joint probability distribution on the total space that projects back to the marginal? We can if we can define an appropriate probability distribution on the complement of the given subspace. Consider a NN-dimensional total space, XX, with the projection, ϖ:X→Yϖ:X→Y, onto a K##BAD TAG##ϖ−1(y)ϖ−1(y) for each y∈Yy∈Y. In order to reconstruct the original probability distribut




#betancourt #probability-theory
By pushing a probability distribution on X X X along the projection operator we compress all of the information about how probability is distributed along the fibers ϖ − 1 ( y ) ϖ−1(y) \varpi^{-1} (y) for each y ∈ Y y∈Y y \in Y . In order to reconstruct the original probability distribution from a marginal probability distribution we need to specify this lost information.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




#betancourt #probability-theory
A conditional probability distribution defines a probability distribution over each fiber that varies with the base point, y y y , ℙ F ∣ Y :  × Y ( A , y ) → ↦ [ 0 , 1 ] ℙ F ∣ Y [ A , y ] .
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




Why did the Persians invade Greece? After all, there was little in Greece that would have enriched Persia and much that would have drained its resources. At the time, many of the Greek city-states were hovering on the brink of famine.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




Flashcard 2977576914188

Question
Why did the Persians invade Greece? After all, there was little in Greece that would have enriched Persia and much that would have drained its resources. At the time, many of the Greek city-states were hovering on the brink of [...].
Answer
famine

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Open it
ody>Why did the Persians invade Greece? After all, there was little in Greece that would have enriched Persia and much that would have drained its resources. At the time, many of the Greek city-states were hovering on the brink of famine. <body><html>







#history
When Cyrus’ successors invaded Greece, many, indeed probably most, of the Greek city-states sided with the Persians. Even the Delphic Oracle famously advised the Greeks to make offerings of earth and water, which symbolized Persian hegemony.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on




Flashcard 2977579797772

Question
When Cyrus’ successors invaded Greece, many, indeed probably most, of the Greek city-states sided with [...] Even the Delphic Oracle famously advised the Greeks to make offerings of earth and water, which symbolized Persian hegemony.
Answer
the Persians.

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Open it
When Cyrus’ successors invaded Greece, many, indeed probably most, of the Greek city-states sided with the Persians. Even the Delphic Oracle famously advised the Greeks to make offerings of earth and water, which symbolized Persian hegemony.







Flashcard 2977581370636

Question
When Cyrus’ successors invaded Greece, many, indeed probably most, of the Greek city-states sided with the Persians. Even the [...] famously advised the Greeks to make offerings of earth and water, which symbolized Persian hegemony.
Answer
Delphic Oracle

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Open it
When Cyrus’ successors invaded Greece, many, indeed probably most, of the Greek city-states sided with the Persians. Even the Delphic Oracle famously advised the Greeks to make offerings of earth and water, which symbolized Persian hegemony.







#betancourt #probability-theory
In the context of modeling an observational process, this method of construction a complicated distribution from intermediate conditional probability distributions is known as generative modeling. In particular, each intermediate conditional probability distribution models some fragment of the full observational process.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Probability Theory (For Scientists and Engineers)
nal space. We can reduce the specification of the ungainly joint probability distribution with a sequence of lower-dimensional conditional probability distributions and marginal probability distributions about which we can more easily reason. <span>In the context of modeling an observational process, this method of construction a complicated distribution from intermediate conditional probability distributions is known as generative modeling. In particular, each intermediate conditional probability distribution models some fragment of the full observational process. 3 Representing Probability Distributions with Density Functions As we saw in the previous section, formal probability theory is simply the study of probability distributions t




Article 2977587924236

Iran 1

Plentiful and usually cheap Iranian energy has played a major role in the industrialization of the European developed world ever since and today turns the wheels of Asia. Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 Although he was culturally Greek, Herodotus was a Per-sian subject. Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 In Herodotus’ time, when Persian envoys were sent to Sparta and Athens to negotiate a cease-fire, the Spartans and Athenians threw them “into a pit like criminals Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From P



Although he was culturally Greek, Herodotus was a Per-sian subject.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>Although he was culturally Greek, Herodotus was a Per-sian subject. Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This m




In Herodotus’ time, when Persian envoys were sent to Sparta and Athens to negotiate a cease-fire, the Spartans and Athenians threw them “into a pit like criminals
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>In Herodotus’ time, when Persian envoys were sent to Sparta and Athens to negotiate a cease-fire, the Spartans and Athenians threw them “into a pit like criminals Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This m




Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This m




Flashcard 2977594739980

Question
Surprisingly, we know little of [...], although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I
Answer
Cyrus

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, h

Original toplevel document

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This m







Flashcard 2977596312844

Question
Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not [...]. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I
Answer
massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
sian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not <span>massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils

Original toplevel document

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This m







Flashcard 2977597885708

Question
Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent [...], whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I
Answer
Jews

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
e standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent <span>Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I </sp

Original toplevel document

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This m







Flashcard 2977599458572

Question
Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to [...] and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I
Answer
Jerusalem

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
th Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to <span>Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I <span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>Surprisingly, we know little of Cyrus, although he became the archetype of the Persian ruler and perhaps the most famous man in Persian history. He conquered most of western Asia, but, judged by the standards of his time, he was both humane and tolerant. Unlike earlier and later rulers, both Eastern and Western, he did not massacre the people he conquered and did not try to suppress local cults. While in Babylon, he gave the resi-dent Jews, whom the Assyrians had exiled to the “Baby-lonian Captivity,” permission to return to Jerusalem and restored to them the temple utensils that Nebuchad-nezzar had confiscated. I Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This m







Article 2977605225740



"Couple this with the fact that humans’ frontal lobes—the area of the brain responsible for things like impulse control—aren’t necessarily fully developed until their mid-30s, and you have the potential for reactive, violent behavior, especially among young men" "sadistic male serial killers used the former, “expressing” their rage against women or their mother or gay men on body after almost identical body" "percent of mass killers are male, as are 88.3 percent of homicide offenders in general. And then someone like Nasim Najafi Aghdam, the YouTube shooter, comes along." "Serial murderesses are often really good at being serial murderesses, and tend to kill for much longer than their male counterparts. It’s the sort of crime that lends itself well to quiet personalities, and if you don’t look like a “typical” serial killer, it’s easier not to get caught." "quickly. It is expressive violence (violence designed to communicate something), rather than instrumental violence (violence designed to achie



Couple this with the fact that humans’ frontal lobes—the area of the brain responsible for things like impulse control—aren’t necessarily fully developed until their mid-30s, and you have the potential for reactive, violent behavior, especially among young men
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Open it
"Couple this with the fact that humans’ frontal lobes—the area of the brain responsible for things like impulse control—aren’t necessarily fully developed until their mid-30s, and you have the potential for reactive, violent behavior, especially among young men" "sadistic male serial killers used the former, “expressing” their rage against women or their mother or gay men on body after almost identical body" &#13




Xenophon
ideal of monarchy, and Alexander the Great is said to have tried to model his imperial persona on Cyrus
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>Xenophon ideal of monarchy, and Alexander the Great is said to have tried to model his imperial persona on Cyrus. Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This




Flashcard 2977610206476

Question
Xenophon
ideal of monarchy, and Alexander the Great is said to have tried to model his imperial [...]
Answer
persona on Cyrus

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
Xenophon ideal of monarchy, and Alexander the Great is said to have tried to model his imperial persona on Cyrus

Original toplevel document

Iran 1
ed to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This material may be protected by copyright. Read this book on Scribd: https://www.scribd.com/book/182507200 <span>Xenophon ideal of monarchy, and Alexander the Great is said to have tried to model his imperial persona on Cyrus. Excerpt From: "Understanding Iran: Everything You Need to Know, From Persia to the Islamic Republic, From Cyrus to Khamenei" by William R. Polk. Scribd. This







Denominamos como Sistema Convencional de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios quando utilizamos um Painel eletrônico ou eletromecânico que disponibiliza pelo menos um laço convencional (circuito elétrico) em 24VCC, laço este que possibilita a instalação de um número limitado por norma de dispositivos de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios, a saber, vinte dispositivos como acionadores manuais de alarme, detectores de fumaça, etc.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Sistemas de detecção de incêndio Convencional ou Endereçável? | Marcus Sales Consultoria
ionais e Sistemas Endereçáveis. Para entendermos bem o que são Sistemas Endereçáveis, precisamos conhecer um pouco sobre Sistemas Convencionais de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios. SISTEMAS CONVENCIONAIS DE DETECÇÃO E ALARME DE INCÊNDIOS <span>Denominamos como Sistema Convencional de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios quando utilizamos um Painel eletrônico ou eletromecânico que disponibiliza pelo menos um laço convencional (circuito elétrico) em 24VCC, laço este que possibilita a instalação de um número limitado por norma de dispositivos de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios, a saber, vinte dispositivos como acionadores manuais de alarme, detectores de fumaça, etc. Se neste laço convencional um dispositivo qualquer for atuado, será possível identificar no Painel Convencional que o laço está em alarme. A forma de reconhecimento pelo Painel é fe




#incêndio
Para uma eventual necessidade de 150 dispositivos, serão necessários pelo menos 8 laços convencionais de alarme, já que o máximo por laço ou zona é de 20 dispositivos.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Sistemas de detecção de incêndio Convencional ou Endereçável? | Marcus Sales Consultoria
ito e identificar, visualmente, qual foi o dispositivo atuado. Se a necessidade de cobertura de alarme exigir um número muito grande de dispositivos, deverão sair do Painel Convencional de Alarme, cabos para cada laço convencional. Exemplo: <span>para uma eventual necessidade de 150 dispositivos, serão necessários pelo menos oito laços convencionais de alarme (150 / 20). SISTEMAS ENDEREÇÁVEIS DE DETECÇÃO E ALARME DE INCÊNDIOS Denominamos como Sistema Endereçável de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios quando utilizamos um Painel eletrônico que disponibi




Sistema Endereçável de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios quando utilizamos um Painel eletrônico que disponibiliza pelo menos um laço endereçável (circuito elétrico), laço este que possibilita a instalação de um número limitado por norma de dispositivos de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios, a saber, duzentos e cinquenta dispositivos como acionadores manuais de alarme, detectores de fumaça, etc., onde cada um dos dispositivos ligados no laço endereçável têm um endereço lógico único.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

Sistemas de detecção de incêndio Convencional ou Endereçável? | Marcus Sales Consultoria
para cada laço convencional. Exemplo: para uma eventual necessidade de 150 dispositivos, serão necessários pelo menos oito laços convencionais de alarme (150 / 20). SISTEMAS ENDEREÇÁVEIS DE DETECÇÃO E ALARME DE INCÊNDIOS Denominamos como <span>Sistema Endereçável de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios quando utilizamos um Painel eletrônico que disponibiliza pelo menos um laço endereçável (circuito elétrico), laço este que possibilita a instalação de um número limitado por norma de dispositivos de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios, a saber, duzentos e cinquenta dispositivos como acionadores manuais de alarme, detectores de fumaça, etc., onde cada um dos dispositivos ligados no laço endereçável têm um endereço lógico único. A forma de reconhecimento pelo Painel Endereçável é feita através de um protocolo de comunicação (um software), e não mais por queda de tensão, ou seja, se um dispositivo qualquer for




Flashcard 2977619643660

Tags
#incêndio
Question
Para uma eventual necessidade de 150 dispositivos, serão necessários pelo menos [...] laços convencionais de alarme, já que o máximo por laço ou zona é de [...] dispositivos.
Answer
8
20

statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

Parent (intermediate) annotation

Open it
Para uma eventual necessidade de 150 dispositivos, serão necessários pelo menos 8 laços convencionais de alarme, já que o máximo por laço ou zona é de 20 dispositivos.

Original toplevel document

Sistemas de detecção de incêndio Convencional ou Endereçável? | Marcus Sales Consultoria
ito e identificar, visualmente, qual foi o dispositivo atuado. Se a necessidade de cobertura de alarme exigir um número muito grande de dispositivos, deverão sair do Painel Convencional de Alarme, cabos para cada laço convencional. Exemplo: <span>para uma eventual necessidade de 150 dispositivos, serão necessários pelo menos oito laços convencionais de alarme (150 / 20). SISTEMAS ENDEREÇÁVEIS DE DETECÇÃO E ALARME DE INCÊNDIOS Denominamos como Sistema Endereçável de Detecção e Alarme de Incêndios quando utilizamos um Painel eletrônico que disponibi







#economia #mises
Os sindicatos, para Marx, só tinham importância na medida em que atacassem “o próprio sistema da escravidão salarial e os métodos atuais de produção”. 10 Deviam compreender que “em vez do lema con- servador: Um bom salário-dia, por um bom dia de trabalho!”, deveriam inscrever na sua bandeira a palavra de ordem revolucionária: Abaixo o sistema salarial!”. 11 Os marxistas mais consistentes sempre se opuse- ram às tentativas de impor salários mínimos, por considerá-las preju- diciais aos interesses da classe trabalhadora como um todo.
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

pdf

cannot see any pdfs




#economia #mises
medidas conhecidas hoje em dia como política de pleno emprego: auxílio-desemprego, arbitragem de questões trabalhistas, realização de obras públicas por meio de gastos suntuários, inflação e expansão creditícia
statusnot read reprioritisations
last reprioritisation on suggested re-reading day
started reading on finished reading on

pdf

cannot see any pdfs