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Flashcard 1425514564876

Tags
#cfa-level-1 #economics #economics-in-a-global-context #los #reading-20-international-trade-and-capital-flows
Question
Gross national product (GNP) measures the market value of all final goods and services produced by factors of production supplied by residents of a country, regardless of whether such production takes place [...]
Answer
within the country or outside of the country.

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>Gross national product (GNP) measures the market value of all final goods and services produced by factors of production (such as labor and capital) supplied by residents of a country, regardless of whether such production takes place within the country or outside of the country.<span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

2.1. Basic Terminology
ic product (GDP) measures the market value of all final goods and services produced by factors of production (such as labor and capital) located within a country/economy during a given period of time, generally a year or a quarter. <span>Gross national product (GNP), however, measures the market value of all final goods and services produced by factors of production (such as labor and capital) supplied by residents of a country, regardless of whether such production takes place within the country or outside of the country. The difference between a country’s GDP and its GNP is that GDP includes, and GNP excludes, the production of goods and services by foreigners within that country, whereas GNP







Flashcard 1481669479692

Tags
#cfa-level-1 #expense-recognition #reading-25-understanding-income-statement
Question
Under the [...], the asset is reported at its fair value.
Answer
revaluation model

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model, the depreciable amount of that asset (cost less residual value) is allocated on a systematic basis over the remaining useful life of the asset. Under the cost model, the asset is reported at its cost less any accumulated depreciation. <span>Under the revaluation model, the asset is reported at its fair value. The revaluation model is not permitted under US GAAP. Here, we will focus only on the cost model. There are two other differences between IFRS and US GAAP to note: IFRS require each com

Original toplevel document

4.2. Issues in Expense Recognition
the amount of future expenses resulting from its warranties, to recognize an estimated warranty expense in the period of the sale, and to update the expense as indicated by experience over the life of the warranty. <span>4.2.3. Depreciation and Amortisation Companies commonly incur costs to obtain long-lived assets. Long-lived assets are assets expected to provide economic benefits over a future period of time greater than one year. Examples are land (property), plant, equipment, and intangible assets (assets lacking physical substance) such as trademarks. The costs of most long-lived assets are allocated over the period of time during which they provide economic benefits. The two main types of long-lived assets whose costs are not allocated over time are land and those intangible assets with indefinite useful lives. Depreciation is the process of systematically allocating costs of long-lived assets over the period during which the assets are expected to provide economic benefits. “Depreciation” is the term commonly applied to this process for physical long-lived assets such as plant and equipment (land is not depreciated), and amortisation is the term commonly applied to this process for intangible long-lived assets with a finite useful life.32 Examples of intangible long-lived assets with a finite useful life include an acquired mailing list, an acquired patent with a set expiration date, and an acquired copyright with a set legal life. The term “amortisation” is also commonly applied to the systematic allocation of a premium or discount relative to the face value of a fixed-income security over the life of the security. IFRS allow two alternative models for valuing property, plant, and equipment: the cost model and the revaluation model.33 Under the cost model, the depreciable amount of that asset (cost less residual value) is allocated on a systematic basis over the remaining useful life of the asset. Under the cost model, the asset is reported at its cost less any accumulated depreciation. Under the revaluation model, the asset is reported at its fair value. The revaluation model is not permitted under US GAAP. Here, we will focus only on the cost model. There are two other differences between IFRS and US GAAP to note: IFRS require each component of an asset to be depreciated separately and US GAAP do not require component depreciation; and IFRS require an annual review of residual value and useful life, and US GAAP do not explicitly require such a review. The method used to compute depreciation should reflect the pattern over which the economic benefits of the asset are expected to be consumed. IFRS do not prescribe a particular method for computing depreciation but note that several methods are commonly used, such as the straight-line method, diminishing balance method (accelerated depreciation), and the units of production method (depreciation varies depending upon production or usage). The straight-line method allocates evenly the cost of long-lived assets less estimated residual value over the estimated useful life of an asset. (The term “straight line” derives from the fact that the annual depreciation expense, if represented as a line graph over time, would be a straight line. In addition, a plot of the cost of the asset minus the cumulative amount of annual depreciation expense, if represented as a line graph over time, would be a straight line with a negative downward slope.) Calculating depreciation and amortisation requires two significant estimates: the estimated useful life of an asset and the estimated residual value (also known as “salvage value”) of an asset. Under IFRS, the residual value is the amount that the company expects to receive upon sale of the asset at the end of its useful life. Example 9 assumes that an item of equipment is depreciated using the straight-line method and illustrates how the annual depreciation expense varies under different estimates of the useful life and estimated residual value of an asset. As shown, annual depreciation expense is sensitive to both the estimated useful life and to the estimated residual value. <span><body><html>







Flashcard 1615962443020

Question
The [...] method reconciles net income to net cash flow from operating activities.
Answer
indirect method

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Subject 2. Preparing the Cash Flow Statement
; It adjusts each item in the income statement to its cash equivalent. It shows operating cash receipts and payments. More cash flow information can be obtained and it is more easily understood by the average reader. <span>The indirect method reconciles net income to net cash flow from operating activities by adjusting net income for all non-cash items and the net changes in the operating working capital accounts. It shows why net income and operating cash flows differ. It is used by most companies. The direct and indirect methods are alternative formats for reporti







Flashcard 1619912953100

Question

You can generally convert indirect format to the direct format by:

  • Aggregate all revenue and all expenses.
  • Remove all non-cash items from it and break out remaining items into relevant cash flow items.
  • Convert accrual amounts to cash flow amounts by [...]
Answer
adjusting for working capital changes.

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Subject 2. Preparing the Cash Flow Statement
the financing activity of paying cash dividends of $48,000. The statement of cash flows is prepared as follows: Conversion of Cash Flows from the Indirect to the Direct Method <span>Although the indirect method is most commonly used by companies, the analyst can generally convert it to the direct format by following a simple three-step process. Aggregate all revenue and all expenses. Remove all non-cash items from aggregated revenues and expenses and break out remaining items into relevant cash flow items. Convert accrual amounts to cash flow amounts by adjusting for working capital changes. <span><body><html>







Flashcard 1620821019916

Tags
#cfa-level-1 #reading-23-financial-reporting-mechanics
Question
Name if the account's financial statement element

Investments accounted for by the equity method
Answer
Assets

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Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment propert

Original toplevel document

3.1. Financial Statement Elements and Accounts
ounting periods), and sales returns and allowances (an offset to revenue reflecting any cash refunds, credits on account, and discounts from sales prices given to customers who purchased defective or unsatisfactory items). <span>Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment property Intangible assets (patents, trademarks, licenses, copyright, goodwill) Financial assets, trading securities, investment securities Investments accounted for by the equity method Current and deferred tax assets [for banks, Loans (receivable)] Liabilities Accounts payable, trade payables Provisions or accrued liabilities Financial liabilities Current and deferred tax liabilities Reserves Unearned revenue Debt payable Bonds (payable) [for banks, Deposits] Owners’ Equity Capital, such as common stock par value Additional paid-in capital Retained earnings Other comprehensive income Minority interest Revenue Revenue, sales Gains Investment income (e.g., interest and dividends) Expense Cost of goods sold Selling, general, and administrative expenses “SG&A” (e.g., rent, utilities, salaries, advertising) Depreciation and amortization Interest expense Tax expense Losses For presentation purposes, assets are sometimes categorized as “current” or “non-current.” For example, Tesco (a large European retailer) prese







Flashcard 1620830981388

Tags
#cfa-level-1 #reading-23-financial-reporting-mechanics
Question
Name the account's financial statement element

Financial liabilities
Answer
Liabilities

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Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment propert

Original toplevel document

3.1. Financial Statement Elements and Accounts
ounting periods), and sales returns and allowances (an offset to revenue reflecting any cash refunds, credits on account, and discounts from sales prices given to customers who purchased defective or unsatisfactory items). <span>Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment property Intangible assets (patents, trademarks, licenses, copyright, goodwill) Financial assets, trading securities, investment securities Investments accounted for by the equity method Current and deferred tax assets [for banks, Loans (receivable)] Liabilities Accounts payable, trade payables Provisions or accrued liabilities Financial liabilities Current and deferred tax liabilities Reserves Unearned revenue Debt payable Bonds (payable) [for banks, Deposits] Owners’ Equity Capital, such as common stock par value Additional paid-in capital Retained earnings Other comprehensive income Minority interest Revenue Revenue, sales Gains Investment income (e.g., interest and dividends) Expense Cost of goods sold Selling, general, and administrative expenses “SG&A” (e.g., rent, utilities, salaries, advertising) Depreciation and amortization Interest expense Tax expense Losses For presentation purposes, assets are sometimes categorized as “current” or “non-current.” For example, Tesco (a large European retailer) prese







Flashcard 1620832816396

Tags
#cfa-level-1 #reading-23-financial-reporting-mechanics
Question
Name the account's financial statement element

Current and deferred tax liabilities
Answer
Liabilities

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Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment propert

Original toplevel document

3.1. Financial Statement Elements and Accounts
ounting periods), and sales returns and allowances (an offset to revenue reflecting any cash refunds, credits on account, and discounts from sales prices given to customers who purchased defective or unsatisfactory items). <span>Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment property Intangible assets (patents, trademarks, licenses, copyright, goodwill) Financial assets, trading securities, investment securities Investments accounted for by the equity method Current and deferred tax assets [for banks, Loans (receivable)] Liabilities Accounts payable, trade payables Provisions or accrued liabilities Financial liabilities Current and deferred tax liabilities Reserves Unearned revenue Debt payable Bonds (payable) [for banks, Deposits] Owners’ Equity Capital, such as common stock par value Additional paid-in capital Retained earnings Other comprehensive income Minority interest Revenue Revenue, sales Gains Investment income (e.g., interest and dividends) Expense Cost of goods sold Selling, general, and administrative expenses “SG&A” (e.g., rent, utilities, salaries, advertising) Depreciation and amortization Interest expense Tax expense Losses For presentation purposes, assets are sometimes categorized as “current” or “non-current.” For example, Tesco (a large European retailer) prese







Flashcard 1620838845708

Tags
#cfa-level-1 #reading-23-financial-reporting-mechanics
Question
Name the account's financial statement element

Debt payable
Answer
Liabilities

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Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment propert

Original toplevel document

3.1. Financial Statement Elements and Accounts
ounting periods), and sales returns and allowances (an offset to revenue reflecting any cash refunds, credits on account, and discounts from sales prices given to customers who purchased defective or unsatisfactory items). <span>Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment property Intangible assets (patents, trademarks, licenses, copyright, goodwill) Financial assets, trading securities, investment securities Investments accounted for by the equity method Current and deferred tax assets [for banks, Loans (receivable)] Liabilities Accounts payable, trade payables Provisions or accrued liabilities Financial liabilities Current and deferred tax liabilities Reserves Unearned revenue Debt payable Bonds (payable) [for banks, Deposits] Owners’ Equity Capital, such as common stock par value Additional paid-in capital Retained earnings Other comprehensive income Minority interest Revenue Revenue, sales Gains Investment income (e.g., interest and dividends) Expense Cost of goods sold Selling, general, and administrative expenses “SG&A” (e.g., rent, utilities, salaries, advertising) Depreciation and amortization Interest expense Tax expense Losses For presentation purposes, assets are sometimes categorized as “current” or “non-current.” For example, Tesco (a large European retailer) prese







Flashcard 1620843302156

Tags
#cfa-level-1 #reading-23-financial-reporting-mechanics
Question
Name if the account's financial statement element

Capital, such as common stock par value
Answer
Owners' Equity

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Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment propert

Original toplevel document

3.1. Financial Statement Elements and Accounts
ounting periods), and sales returns and allowances (an offset to revenue reflecting any cash refunds, credits on account, and discounts from sales prices given to customers who purchased defective or unsatisfactory items). <span>Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment property Intangible assets (patents, trademarks, licenses, copyright, goodwill) Financial assets, trading securities, investment securities Investments accounted for by the equity method Current and deferred tax assets [for banks, Loans (receivable)] Liabilities Accounts payable, trade payables Provisions or accrued liabilities Financial liabilities Current and deferred tax liabilities Reserves Unearned revenue Debt payable Bonds (payable) [for banks, Deposits] Owners’ Equity Capital, such as common stock par value Additional paid-in capital Retained earnings Other comprehensive income Minority interest Revenue Revenue, sales Gains Investment income (e.g., interest and dividends) Expense Cost of goods sold Selling, general, and administrative expenses “SG&A” (e.g., rent, utilities, salaries, advertising) Depreciation and amortization Interest expense Tax expense Losses For presentation purposes, assets are sometimes categorized as “current” or “non-current.” For example, Tesco (a large European retailer) prese







Flashcard 1620871089420

Tags
#cfa-level-1 #reading-23-financial-reporting-mechanics
Question
Name if the account's financial statement element
Tax expense
Answer
Expense

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Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment propert

Original toplevel document

3.1. Financial Statement Elements and Accounts
ounting periods), and sales returns and allowances (an offset to revenue reflecting any cash refunds, credits on account, and discounts from sales prices given to customers who purchased defective or unsatisfactory items). <span>Exhibit 2. Common Accounts Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, trade receivables Prepaid expenses Inventory Property, plant, and equipment Investment property Intangible assets (patents, trademarks, licenses, copyright, goodwill) Financial assets, trading securities, investment securities Investments accounted for by the equity method Current and deferred tax assets [for banks, Loans (receivable)] Liabilities Accounts payable, trade payables Provisions or accrued liabilities Financial liabilities Current and deferred tax liabilities Reserves Unearned revenue Debt payable Bonds (payable) [for banks, Deposits] Owners’ Equity Capital, such as common stock par value Additional paid-in capital Retained earnings Other comprehensive income Minority interest Revenue Revenue, sales Gains Investment income (e.g., interest and dividends) Expense Cost of goods sold Selling, general, and administrative expenses “SG&A” (e.g., rent, utilities, salaries, advertising) Depreciation and amortization Interest expense Tax expense Losses For presentation purposes, assets are sometimes categorized as “current” or “non-current.” For example, Tesco (a large European retailer) prese







Flashcard 1621266664716

Tags
#cashflow-statement
Question
FCF accounts for Capex and [...]
Answer
dividend payments

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Subject 3. Cash Flow Statement Analysis
CFO. CFO does not include cash outlays for replacing old equipment. Free Cash Flow (FCF) is intended to measure the cash available to a company for discretionary uses after making all required cash outlays. <span>It accounts for capital expenditures and dividend payments, which are essential to the ongoing nature of the business. The basic definition is cash from operations less the amount of capital expenditures required to maintain the company's present productive capacity. &#







Flashcard 1621343210764

Question
Operating cash inflows by source (e.g., cash received from [...] , cash received from [...] )
Answer
Customers

investment income

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Subject 2. Preparing the Cash Flow Statement
perating activities. There are two methods of converting the income statement from an accrual basis to a cash basis. Companies can use either the direct or the indirect method for reporting their operating cash flow. <span>The direct method discloses operating cash inflows by source (e.g., cash received from customers, cash received from investment income) and operating cash outflows by use (e.g., cash paid to suppliers, cash paid for interest) in the operating activities section of the cash flow statement. It adjusts each item in the income statement to its cash equivalent. It shows operating cash receipts and payments. More cash flow information can be obtained and it is mor







Flashcard 1621345832204

Question
Operating cash outflows by use (e.g., cash paid to [...] , cash paid [...] )
Answer
suppliers

for interest

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Subject 2. Preparing the Cash Flow Statement
perating activities. There are two methods of converting the income statement from an accrual basis to a cash basis. Companies can use either the direct or the indirect method for reporting their operating cash flow. <span>The direct method discloses operating cash inflows by source (e.g., cash received from customers, cash received from investment income) and operating cash outflows by use (e.g., cash paid to suppliers, cash paid for interest) in the operating activities section of the cash flow statement. It adjusts each item in the income statement to its cash equivalent. It shows operating cash receipts and payments. More cash flow information can be obtained and it is mor







Flashcard 1621382270220

Tags
#tvm
Question
What is Mexico's nominal risk-free interest rate?
Answer
CETES

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Flashcard 1621384891660

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#tvm
Question
The [...] compensates investors for the risk of loss relative to an investment’s fair value if the investment needs to be converted to cash quickly.

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Flashcard 1621386726668

Tags
#tvm
Question
Do US T-bills bear a liquidity premium?
Answer
No

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Flashcard 1621388037388

Tags
#tvm
Question
US T-bills don't bear a liquidity premium because [...] .
Answer
large amounts can be bought and sold without affecting their market price

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Flashcard 1621389872396

Tags
#tvm
Question

Liquidity premium reflects on the high cost of [...]

Answer
selling a position.

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Flashcard 1621391707404

Tags
#tvm
Question
The [...] compensates investors for the increased sensitivity of the market value of debt to a change in market interest rates.

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Maturity Premium
#tvm
The maturity premium compensates investors for the increased sensitivity of the market value of debt to a change in market interest rates as maturity is extended, in general (holding all else equal). The difference between the interest rate on longer-maturity, liquid Treasury debt and that on short-term Treasury debt reflects a positive maturity premium for the longer-term debt (and possibly different inflation premiums as well).
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Flashcard 1621395901708

Tags
#tvm
Question
How many ways to quote interest rates for investments paying more than once a year?
Answer
three

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Flashcard 1621397736716

Tags
#tvm
Question
[...] is the rate of interest earned over a single compounding period.
Answer
Periodic interest rate

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Flashcard 1621399571724

Tags
#tvm
Question
If a bank states that a particular CD pays a rate of 3% that compounds 4 times a year this is an example of what kind of rate?
Answer
Periodic interest rate

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Flashcard 1621401406732

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#tvm
Question
[...], is the annual rate of interest that does not account for compounding within the year.
Answer
Stated annual interest rate

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Flashcard 1621403241740

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#tvm
Question
Stated annual interest rate is also called [...]
Answer
Quoted interest rate

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Flashcard 1621405863180

Tags
#tvm
Question
Which is the annual interest rate quoted by financial institutions?
Answer
Stated annual interest rate

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Flashcard 1621407698188

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#tvm
Question
The periodic interest rate multiplied by the number of compounding periods per year is equal to the [...]
Answer
Stated annual interest rate

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Flashcard 1621409533196

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#tvm
Question
[...] is the annual rate of interest that takes full account of compounding within the year.
Answer
Effective annual rate (EAR)

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In the history group, the participants sought answers to their questions on the internet, but had no means of judging which version of history was the valid one. They gathered facts and dates through various search engines, but whereas one website ex plained the construction of the Berlin Wall as a way of preventing GDR citi zens from being seduced by Western capitalism, another explained the Wall as the GDRs defense against aggressive Western powers that were stationing Jupiter missiles on German, Italian and Turkish soil, equipped with nuclear heads directed towards Moscow. The Chinese teachers had no idea why Americans would be dancing at the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. They were unfamiliar with the history of the Cold War between the United States and the USSR, and they didn't know to what extent the American occupation of West Germany was crucial to understanding the history of the Berlin Wall.
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pressed to explain the concept of Vergangenheitsbew?ltigung to the puzzled Chinese teachers, they admitted that it had something to do with guilt and atonement for crimes committed during the Third Reich. However, when the Chinese teachers said there was no equivalent term in Chinese, the Germans were sur prised. Didn't the Chinese have to "deal with the past77 of their Cultural Revo lution? The embarrassed silence that ensued was indicative of the limits of intercultural competence when it comes to the appropriateness of openly dis cussing differing versions of history. As guest teachers in Taiwanese schools, the German teachers said, it was not appropriate for them to suggest parallels between, say, the East-West German conflict and the People's Republic of China (PRC)-Taiwan or the North-South Korean situation. Such
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The Bakhtin scholar Michael Holquist (1990) calls this relationality of Self and Other ‘dialogism’.
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Bakhtin calls the ability of speakers to see themselves from the outside “transgredience”.
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Through transgredience, language learners learn not only to use the language correctly and appropriately, but to reflect on their experience. They occupy a position where they see themselves both from the inside and from the outside – what I have called a “third place”
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What emerges from these answers, however, is an approach that characterizes metadiscourse as a secondary discourse and that abstracts it away from its concomitant rhetorical milieu. Not only does this approach unnecessarily relegate metadiscourse to an inferior status, but it also fails to point out that our current theorizing about metadiscourse is inevitably local and intimately tied to a particular context.
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I will blur the distinction between primary discourse and secondary discourse and recover the link of metadiscourse to its associated rhetorical context.
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I begin with some brief remarks concerning the term metadiscourse. Two meanings have in general surfaced in connection with the term. On the one hand, metadiscourse is often used broadly to refer to discourse about discourse, to any kind of critical interpretation or theoretical exposition of a given (or "target") discourse or theory. Such a meaning entails an abstract connotation and resonates with a postmodern stance to deconstruct, to historicize theory; it is analogous to the meaning evident in other such terms as metacognition and metahistory fre- quently adopted in the respective fields of cognitive science and history. On the other hand, metadiscourse also has a more concrete meaning; it refers to various kinds of linguistic tokens that an author employs in her text to guide or direct her reader as to how to understand her, her text, and her stance toward it. 4 This concrete meaning, which is identified as "metalanguage" by sociolinguists,
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represents the sum total of all kinds of such linguistic tokens or "signposts" (Stubbs 65). It is this meaning conveyed by the term metadiscourse that rhetoricians and composition theorists have largely been preoccupied with, even though the major- ity of them have not explicitly distinguished it from the first, more abstract meaning. It is also this concrete meaning on which my paper is going to be centered. To avoid unnecessary confusion resulting from the potentially polysomic term metadiscourse, 5 I dub various kinds of linguistic tokens that realize the second sense of metadiscourse: metadiscourse markers.
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Flashcard 1621439941900

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#tvm
Question
What is the difference between nominal risk-free rate and real risk-free rate of return?
Answer
The nominal one takes inflation into account

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The nominal risk-free rate of return includes both the real risk-free rate of return and the expected rate of inflation. A decrease in expected inflation rate would decrease the nominal risk-free rate of return, but would have no effect on the real risk-free rate of return.







Indeed this poetic duel is one of the most commented upon episodes in the history of Arabic literature, but that is not reflected in the documentation for this ar- ticle.
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the second suggested step: establishing reliable translations and interpretations of the poetic material. The texts are hard—there is no question about that—but there is at least a good edition and commentary (Bevan). That being said, many of the interpretations result from mis-interpretations and mis-translations of the text, in my opinion.
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The majorbrain stem areas are the pons, medulla, and reticular formation
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The pons, the upper portion of the brain stem, and the medulla, found at the bottom of the brain stem just above the spinal cord, are involved in sleep (including initiation of REM sleep), respiration, movement, and cardiovascular activity
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Damage to the medulla or pons can lead to failure of bodily functions and death.
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The reticular formation is a set of interconnected nuclei in the brainstem, especially important in awareness, attention, and sleep. Part of the reticular formation, the reticular activating system (RAS), projects to the thalamus. The RAS is involved in the sleep-wake cycle, serves as a filter for incoming sensory information, and mediates alertness
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A reserve is profits that have been appropriated for a particular purpose. Reserves are sometimes set up to purchase fixed assets, pay an expected legal settlement, pay bonuses, pay off debt, pay for repairs and maintenance, and so forth.
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reserves+accounting - Buscar con Google
istorySearch help Tools Any time Any time Past hour Past 24 hours Past week Past month Past year Custom range... Customised date range From To All results All results Verbatim About 89,500,000 results (0.56 seconds) Search Results <span>A reserve is profits that have been appropriated for a particular purpose. Reserves are sometimes set up to purchase fixed assets, pay an expected legal settlement, pay bonuses, pay off debt, pay for repairs and maintenance, and so forth.Jan 5, 2013 Reserve accounting — AccountingTools https://www.accountingtools.com/articles/what-is-reserve-accounting.html Feedback About this result People also ask What




Flashcard 1621934869772

Tags
#fra-introduction
Question
A [...] is profits that have been appropriated for a particular purpose.
Answer
reserve

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A reserve is profits that have been appropriated for a particular purpose. Reserves are sometimes set up to purchase fixed assets, pay an expected legal settlement, pay bonuses, pay off debt, pay for repairs and maintenance, and so forth.<

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reserves+accounting - Buscar con Google
istorySearch help Tools Any time Any time Past hour Past 24 hours Past week Past month Past year Custom range... Customised date range From To All results All results Verbatim About 89,500,000 results (0.56 seconds) Search Results <span>A reserve is profits that have been appropriated for a particular purpose. Reserves are sometimes set up to purchase fixed assets, pay an expected legal settlement, pay bonuses, pay off debt, pay for repairs and maintenance, and so forth.Jan 5, 2013 Reserve accounting — AccountingTools https://www.accountingtools.com/articles/what-is-reserve-accounting.html Feedback About this result People also ask What







Flashcard 1621937229068

Question
[...] are sometimes set up to purchase fixed assets, pay an expected legal settlement, pay bonuses, pay off debt, pay for repairs and maintenance, and so forth.
Answer
Reserves

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A reserve is profits that have been appropriated for a particular purpose. Reserves are sometimes set up to purchase fixed assets, pay an expected legal settlement, pay bonuses, pay off debt, pay for repairs and maintenance, and so forth.

Original toplevel document

reserves+accounting - Buscar con Google
istorySearch help Tools Any time Any time Past hour Past 24 hours Past week Past month Past year Custom range... Customised date range From To All results All results Verbatim About 89,500,000 results (0.56 seconds) Search Results <span>A reserve is profits that have been appropriated for a particular purpose. Reserves are sometimes set up to purchase fixed assets, pay an expected legal settlement, pay bonuses, pay off debt, pay for repairs and maintenance, and so forth.Jan 5, 2013 Reserve accounting — AccountingTools https://www.accountingtools.com/articles/what-is-reserve-accounting.html Feedback About this result People also ask What







Flashcard 1621957676300

Tags
#reading-6-time-value-of-money
Question
Formula

EAR = [...]
Answer
(1 + periodic interest rate)m - 1

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Subject 1 Time Value of Money and Interest Rates
licate interest rates: Inflation: When prices are expected to increase, lenders charge not only an opportunity cost for postponing consumption but also an inflation premium that takes into account the expected increase in prices. <span>The nominal cost of money consists of the real rate (a pure rate of interest) and an inflation premium. Risk: Companies exhibit varying degrees of uncertainty concerning their ability to repay lenders. Lenders therefore charge interest rates that incorporate default







Flashcard 1621959773452

Tags
#baii
Question
Que es lo primero que tengo que hacer en la calculadora para calcular el interes efectivo?
Answer
2ND y ICON (esta en el 2)

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