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on 21-Mar-2021 (Sun)

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Blueprints are best suited to making event-driven functionality, such as handling damage taking, controls, and other things that don't get called every frame.
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Blueprint Best Practices | Unreal Engine Documentation
act your performance more if they are done in Blueprints. If you have a Blueprint that's doing a lot of operations and complex math every tick, you might want to consider using native C++ code. <span>Blueprints are best suited to making event-driven functionality, such as handling damage taking, controls, and other things that don't get called every frame. If you would like to read more about coding for Blueprints, or the technical details of Blueprint compiling, see the Blueprints Technical Guide . Even if your functionality is well-suit




If you do start out in the Level Blueprint, and then decide to move behavior into a Blueprint Class, this should be a pretty simple process. When you copy functions from a Level Blueprint that operate on Actors (say, calling Set Brightness on a light), and paste them into a Blueprint Class based off of a Light Actor, the functions will update to be in the proper scope.
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Blueprint Best Practices | Unreal Engine Documentation
n your project. If you create a Blueprint Class, you can add it to any of your levels, and you can also add as many copies as you would like to the level, without needing to copy script around. <span>If you do start out in the Level Blueprint, and then decide to move behavior into a Blueprint Class, this should be a pretty simple process. When you copy functions from a Level Blueprint that operate on Actors (say, calling Set Brightness on a light), and paste them into a Blueprint Class based off of a Light Actor, the functions will update to be in the proper scope. Read More: Level Blueprint Blueprint Class Class Variables vs. Local Variables When you're working in your Blueprint, you have the ability to add variables using the My Blueprint When y




There are some key differences that will become more apparent as you get into more advanced use cases.

  • Functions are actually called when you place nodes to call the function. That means you can target them (i.e. "call a function on another object"), and they allow for communication between Blueprints.

  • Macros take the nodes from the macro graph, and actually replace the macro node with a copy of all those nodes. Basically, when the Blueprint is compiled, the macro copies all the graph nodes, and pastes them in where the macro node is.

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Blueprint Best Practices | Unreal Engine Documentation
local variables. Macros use "anonymous" local variables, which don't have a specific name, but just hold a value. Both are awesome ways to encapsulate functionality for reusability and clarity. <span>There are some key differences that will become more apparent as you get into more advanced use cases. Functions are actually called when you place nodes to call the function. That means you can target them (i.e. "call a function on another object"), and they allow for communication between Blueprints. Macros take the nodes from the macro graph, and actually replace the macro node with a copy of all those nodes. Basically, when the Blueprint is compiled, the macro copies all the graph nodes, and pastes them in where the macro node is. Because of how they work under the hood, that means there are a few differences in what you can do: Macros can use any node for the class they're scoped to (the class you pick when you




Exponential Height Fog creates more density in low places of a map and less density in high places. The transition is smooth, so you never get a hard cutoff as you increase altitude. Exponential Height Fog also provides two fog colors—one for the hemisphere facing the dominant directional light (or straight up if none exists), and another color for the opposite hemisphere.
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Exponential Height Fog User Guide | Unreal Engine Documentation
Engine 4.23 Windows MacOS Linux On this page Using Exponential Height Fog Exponential Height Fog Properties Using Exponential Height Fog Features Secondary Fog Layer Volumetric Fog Performance <span>Exponential Height Fog creates more density in low places of a map and less density in high places. The transition is smooth, so you never get a hard cutoff as you increase altitude. Exponential Height Fog also provides two fog colors—one for the hemisphere facing the dominant directional light (or straight up if none exists), and another color for the opposite hemisphere. Using Exponential Height Fog In the Place Actors panel, select the Exponential Height Fog Actor, under Visual Effects. Left-click and drag to place it in the world. Positioning the Expo