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Flashcard 149655129

Tags
#kuchnia #tcm
Question
Kwaśny smak wywołuje [...].
Answer
skurcz


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Kwaśny smak wywołuje skurcz.

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Aristotle confirms my method of applying grammar to peer into the experiences that words and the grammar that binds them represents - by applying this method himself
The discussion in EN 10 deals with a quite different theme attempting to distinguish enjoyment from what is enjoyed. Aristotle sheds light on enjoyment by explaining how the gram- mar of enjoyment-verbs differs from the grammar of process-verbs, such as building something or walking somewhere. According to Owen, he ¯ done ¯ , like its English counterpart ‘pleasure’, has two distinct uses. We can say: ‘Gaming is one of my pleasures’ or ‘Gaming gives me pleasure’. In EN 7 Aristotle mainly deals with the first alternative, identifying pleasure with the activity enjoyed, and in EN 10 he mainly treats pleasures as enjoyments. 29 G. E. L. Owen, ‘Aristotelian Pleasures’, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 72 (1971–2), 135–52; repr. in G. E. L. Owen, Log

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Plato: book of the Soul
#marked
Plato describes the existence of opinions in the soul as follows. The opinions formed by the operations of memory and perception are as it were written in the book of the soul. They can be expressed in spoken language and are true or false. These opinions are also illustrated in the same book by pictures formed by imagination. When something pertain- ing to perceptions is believed, there is also a picture in the soul which shows the perceptual content as it was revealed to the subject (39a–40d)

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#budownictwo #instalacje
Odpowiadając na pytania, sprawdzisz, czy jesteś przygotowany do wykonania ćwiczeń. 1. W jakim celu dokonujemy pomiarów? 2. Czym różni się metoda pomiarowa bezpośrednia od pośredniej? 3. Jaką podziałkę posiada przymiar kreskowy? 4. Do czego służy przymiar taśmowy? 5. Wymień rodzaje kątowników. 6. Do czego służy suwmiarka? 7. Z jaką dokładnością możemy dokonać pomiaru za pomocą suwmiarki uniwersalnej? 8. Czym różni się zastosowanie szczelinomierza i promieniomierza? 9. Co to jest trasowanie? 10. Czym różni się zastosowanie rysików i ryśników? 11. Jakie zastosowanie mają cyrkle? 12. Do czego sł uży kątownik ze stopką?

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#budownictwo #instalacje
4.2.2. Pytania sprawdzające Odpowiadając na pytania, sprawdzisz, czy jesteś przygotowany do zaplanowania przebiegu ćwiczeń i ich wykonania. 1. Co to jest bruzda w przegrodzie budowlanej? 2. W jakim celu wykonujemy bruzdy? 3. Przy użyciu jakich narzędzi możemy wykonywać bruzdy? Od czego to zależy? 4. W jakim celu wykonujemy otwory w przegrodach budowlanych? 5. Wymień sposoby wykonania otworów w przegrodach budowlanych. 6. Co należy brać pod uwagę planując wymiary otworu w przegrodzie? 7. Do czego służą wnęki? 8. Jakie prace wchodzą w skład prac budowlanych przygotowawczo-zakończeniowych w instalacjach sanitarnych?

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Place your finger in the hollow curve of the supra- sternal notch, then move it down approximately 5 cm to the horizontal bony ridge where the manubrium joins the body of the sternum, called the angulus sterni, angle of Ludovici or the angle of Louis.

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Flashcard 1401894604044

Question
Place your finger in the hollow curve of the supra- sternal notch, then move it down approximately 5 cm to the horizontal bony ridge where the manubrium joins the body of the sternum, called the [...], angle of Ludovici or the angle of Louis.
Answer
angulus sterni


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Place your finger in the hollow curve of the supra- sternal notch, then move it down approximately 5 cm to the horizontal bony ridge where the manubrium joins the body of the sternum, called the angulus sterni, angle of Ludovici or the angle of Louis.

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Flashcard 1401896176908

Question
Place your finger in the hollow curve of the supra- sternal notch, then move it down approximately 5 cm to the horizontal bony ridge where the manubrium joins the body of the sternum, called the angulus sterni, [...] or the angle of Louis.
Answer
angle of Ludovici


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l>Place your finger in the hollow curve of the supra- sternal notch, then move it down approximately 5 cm to the horizontal bony ridge where the manubrium joins the body of the sternum, called the angulus sterni, angle of Ludovici or the angle of Louis.<html>

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Flashcard 1401897749772

Question
Place your finger in the hollow curve of the supra- sternal notch, then move it down approximately 5 cm to the horizontal bony ridge where the manubrium joins the body of the sternum, called the angulus sterni, angle of Ludovici or the [...].
Answer
angle of Louis


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n>Place your finger in the hollow curve of the supra- sternal notch, then move it down approximately 5 cm to the horizontal bony ridge where the manubrium joins the body of the sternum, called the angulus sterni, angle of Ludovici or the angle of Louis.<span><body><html>

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#fm #has-images
Approach to patient with Dizziness

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Dizziness/Vertigo
Dizziness/Vertigo Approach to patient with Dizziness Subjective “Does it feel like either the room is spinning or that you are spinning?” and/or “Is it triggered or worsened by turning your head or rolling over in bed?




Dizziness/Vertigo
#fm #has-images
Subjective
  • “Does it feel like either the room is spinning or that you are spinning?” and/or “Is it triggered or worsened by turning your head or rolling over in bed?”

    • Yes = vertigo

      • BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO (most common)

        • brief, recurrent episodes (seconds to minutes), +/- nausea and vomiting

      • Vestibular Neuritis

        • rapid onset, severe, persistent (days), N/V, imbalance

      • Ménière’s Disease

        • recurrent episodes (minutes to hours), fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, and sensation of aural fullness

      • Vestibular Toxicity

        • aminoglycosides (eg. gentamycin), loop diuretics, ASA, NSAIDs, amiodarone, quinine, cisplatin

    • No = other forms of dizziness

      • Presyncopal Dizziness – “feels like nearly fainting or blacking out”

        • ECG

        • Triggered by exertion? Chest pain/palpitations? Known structural heart dz? FmHx of sudden death? Abnormal ECG? (if pt stable, fax ECG for urgent advice)

          • If yes to any, suspect cardiac etiology. Refer to Emergency

          • If no, orthostatic hypotension?

            • Yes = investigate underlying cause. meds/alcohol? Consider CBC/lytes

            • No = likely vasovagal/situational etiology. If recurrent episodes or pt is at risk of injury, consider referral for tilt test (+/- carotid sinus massage if >40 yo)

      • Disequilibrium Dizziness – “unsteadiness while walking”

        • Often multifactorial, common in elderly, risk of falls. Complete neuro and MSK exams to rule out peripheral neuropathy, Parkinsonism, MSK d/o, CVA, etc

      • Nonspecific Dizziness – “woozy”, “giddy”, “light-headed”

        • DDx: hypoglycemic (glucose), thyroid disease (TSH), pregnancy (β-HCG), meds, psychiatric disorders, alcohol/drugs, menstruation, previous head trauma

  • Ask about: onset, duration, nausea, vomiting, hearing loss, tinnitus, headache, imbalance, aural fullness, ear pain, rash, facial paralysis, medications

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Dizziness/Vertigo
Dizziness/Vertigo Approach to patient with Dizziness Subjective “Does it feel like either the room is spinning or that you are spinning?” and/or “Is it triggered or worsened by turning your head or rolling over in bed?” Yes = vertigo BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO (most common) brief, recurrent episodes (seconds to minutes), +/- nausea and vomiting Vestibular Neuritis rapid onset, severe, persistent (days), N/V, imbalance Ménière’s Disease recurrent episodes (minutes to hours), fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, and sensation of aural fullness Vestibular Toxicity aminoglycosides (eg. gentamycin), loop diuretics, ASA, NSAIDs, amiodarone, quinine, cisplatin No = other forms of dizziness Presyncopal Dizziness – “feels like nearly fainting or blacking out” ECG Triggered by exertion? Chest pain/palpitations? Known structural heart dz? FmHx of sudden death? Abnormal ECG? (if pt stable, fax ECG for urgent advice) If yes to any, suspect cardiac etiology. Refer to Emergency If no, orthostatic hypotension? Yes = investigate underlying cause. meds/alcohol? Consider CBC/lytes No = likely vasovagal/situational etiology. If recurrent episodes or pt is at risk of injury, consider referral for tilt test (+/- carotid sinus massage if >40 yo) Disequilibrium Dizziness – “unsteadiness while walking” Often multifactorial, common in elderly, risk of falls. Complete neuro and MSK exams to rule out peripheral neuropathy, Parkinsonism, MSK d/o, CVA, etc Nonspecific Dizziness – “woozy”, “giddy”, “light-headed” DDx: hypoglycemic (glucose), thyroid disease (TSH), pregnancy (β-HCG), meds, psychiatric disorders, alcohol/drugs, menstruation, previous head trauma Ask about: onset, duration, nausea, vomiting, hearing loss, tinnitus, headache, imbalance, aural fullness, ear pain, rash, facial paralysis, medications Objective Assessment viral labyrinthitis benign positional vertigo Eustachian tube dysfunction (often with s




#fm #has-images
Objective

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Dizziness/Vertigo
13; Ask about: onset, duration, nausea, vomiting, hearing loss, tinnitus, headache, imbalance, aural fullness, ear pain, rash, facial paralysis, medications <span>Objective Assessment viral labyrinthitis benign positional vertigo Eustachian tube dysfunction (often with serous otitis media)




Dizziness/Vertigo
#fm #has-images
Assessment

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Dizziness/Vertigo
k about: onset, duration, nausea, vomiting, hearing loss, tinnitus, headache, imbalance, aural fullness, ear pain, rash, facial paralysis, medications Objective <span>Assessment viral labyrinthitis benign positional vertigo Eustachian tube dysfunction (often with serous otitis media) Meniere's disease Vertebrobasilar insufficiency (in the elderly with vasculopathy) Plan <span><body><html>




Dizziness/Vertigo
#fm #has-images

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Dizziness/Vertigo
vertigo Eustachian tube dysfunction (often with serous otitis media) Meniere's disease Vertebrobasilar insufficiency (in the elderly with vasculopathy) <span>Plan <span><body><html>




A gloomy, hair-brained enthusiast, af ter his death, may h ave a place in the calendar; but will scarcely ever be admitted, when alive, into intimacy an d society, except by those who are as delirious and dismal as himself. Hume, An Enquiry Conceming the Principl es of Morals What beings surround me? Hum e, A Treati se of Hummt Nature

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Critics co n cerne d with th e neoclassicism of eigh- teenth-century aesthetics have of co ur se contrasted th e clarity, gener- ality, a nd universality of th e expression of fe eli ng in eigh teenth-ce n- tury drama, verse, and painting to th e messy partic ul ars and rampant in dividualism of romantic feeling. 2 Never th eless, searches for th e ori- gins of th e latter always start with L ocke and Hum e. H ence the " pr e- r oman ti c" aes th etics of sensibi lity and the go thic are often treat ed as th e mi ss in g link in the chain from Locke to Words wo rth : both the ro - ma nti c egoist an d the man and woman of feeling are seen to be in - debt ed to th e emp hasis on feeling in eig ht eenth-centu . ry philosophy.

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here are, however, aspects of th e Treatise of H uma .n Nature th at should make us uncertain whe th er th e pass ions and feelings in Hume's discussions are or are not "of course, one's own." Speaking of othe r people's feelings, he declares, "Hatred, resentme nt , esteem, love, cour - age, mirth, and melanchol y; all these passions I feel more from com- munication than from my own natural temper and disposition." 4 Hum e appears to encOlmter this train of passions th e way a figure in Spenser- ian r omance might encounter a parade of allegoric al feelings ("st erne Str ife and Anger st ou t, I Unqu i et Care an d fon d Unth r iftihead, I Lewd Losse if Tim e, and Sorrow seeming dead"): th e me re lis tin g of t he pas- sions he receives by communication from witho ut tends to ma ke them seem l ike a gang of personified abstractions, heightening the exte rn al- ity of passion he refers to.

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P assions-as we shall see at the end of this chapter-have a close relat ion to pe rsonifications. T hi s re pr esentation of passions as a train of exter ior entities may seem strange, because we tend to see eight een th -ce ntury understanding of p ass ions as qui te re- moved from such wayward, archaic forms.

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Late seventeenth- an d eigh- t eenth-century empiricism ina ugurated a fundamental shift in the way mo d ern E ur opean culture co nce ptu alized emo ti on . In ea rly mo d ern thought, all emotional experien ce falls under the heading of " th e pas- sions," which are tr eated n ot only as i nna t e, natural forces tied closely to the body but also as the essence of volition.

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feeling, and emotion are variants of pleasure and pain, which are states of understanding. This movement brings feeling closer to epistemo- logical matters: empiricism allows e motion to be a way of knowing. Almost all eig ht eent h- centu ry thinkin g about feeling, including Hume' s, co ncerns th e relationship b etwee n its epist emo logical and on- tological status, and its social character.

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On the other hand, it also conte nds th at feelings are tran ss ubjective entities that pass between persons; that our feeling; are always really someone else's; that it is passion that allows us to be per- sons, rather than the other way a. round. These two stories are insepa- rable in the Treatise, as are Hum e's notion of the social "force" of feel- in gs and his theory of knowledge. That is, the movement of feelings between persons- what is call ed "s ympathy "- is crucial to Hum e's moral philosophy, but I hop e to show that it is also su rpri singly c ru cial to hi s em piricism itself

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The notion that a passion can pr oduce an "indiv idual p erson" (T, 286) as its object ( th e idea of self is one tha t pride " never fails to pro- du ce" [T , 287]), rathe r than comi ng from an individual person as its s ource, al erts us to o th er ways in whi ch the notion of"perso n" c om es into being in the Tr e atis e. Passions often act like persons: th e form of pe r sonhood is assumed by man y mental entities. ln th e Tr e atise , rela- tions betwee n ideas and impressions are lik e relations between persons. ln her discussion of H ume's acco unt of associatio ni sm, Ann e tte B aier argues tha t his no ti ons about relations b etween ideas are

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And th e best, the ."liveliest of all objects" that can wake us as if from a dr ea m and give us v igor is "a rational and t hinking Be ing like ourselves" who comm unicates to us all the actions of his mind ; makes us pri vy to his inmost sentiments an d affections; and lets us see, in the very instant of their production, all the emotions, which are caus'd by any object. Every lively idea is agreeable, but especia ll y that of a passion, because such an idea becomes a kind of pas sion, and gives a more sensible agitation to the mind, than any oth er image or conception. (T, 353) Thi s id eal, th e per son to whose "inmos t sentiments and affectio ns " we are pr i vy- total kn owledge of a nother 's emotions- is on e that m ay be hard to attain in real lif e. In the Tr eatise, Hu me seems rel atively un- concerne d with th e qu es ti on of how we really know what other p eo- ple's feelings truly are, a problem Adam Smith makes cen tral to his ac- co unt of sympa th y in A Theo ry of Mo ral Senthnent

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