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#cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #microeconomics #reading-13-demand-and-supply-analysis-introduction #study-session-4
This is price bubbles, buyers and sellers base their expectations of future prices: if price rises, they take that as a sign that price will rise even further.

If buyers see an increase today, they shift the demand curve to the right, desiring to buy more today because they think they would pay more in the future.

Sellers at the same time see an increase in today’s price and think that price will be even higher in the future, they don't sell today holding out for higher prices tomorrow, and that would shift the supply curve to the left.

With a rightward shift in demand and a leftward shift in supply, buyers’ and sellers’ expectations about price are confirmed and the process begins again. This scenario could result in a bubble that would inflate until someone decides that such high prices can no longer be sustained. The bubble bursts and price plunges.

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3.7. The Market Mechanism: Iterating toward Equilibrium—or Not
can behave in ways that are not ultimately sustainable in the long run. They may shoot up for a time but ultimately, if they do not reflect actual valuations, the bubble can burst resulting in a “correction” to a new equilibrium. <span>As a simple approach to understanding bubbles, consider a case in which buyers and sellers base their expectations of future prices on the rate of change of current prices: if price rises, they take that as a sign that price will rise even further. Under these circumstances, if buyers see an increase in price today, they might actually shift the demand curve to the right, desiring to buy more at each price today because they expect to have to pay more in the future. Alternately, if sellers see an increase in today’s price as evidence that price will be even higher in the future, they are reluctant to sell today as they hold out for higher prices tomorrow, and that would shift the supply curve to the left. With a rightward shift in demand and a leftward shift in supply, buyers’ and sellers’ expectations about price are confirmed and the process begins again. This scenario could result in a bubble that would inflate until someone decides that such high prices can no longer be sustained. The bubble bursts and price plunges. <span><body><html>




Flashcard 1428077022476

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#derecho #introduccion-al-derecho
Question
el Derecho depende de la [...], de la sanción que el Estado impone a los ciudadanos para la convivencia en sociedad
Answer
norma


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el Derecho depende de la norma, de la sanción que el Estado impone a los ciudadanos para la convivencia en sociedad

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1.3LA NORMA
de la norma, es pertinente mencionar que las normas en general derivan del Derecho natural y de éste resultan o emanan las leyes naturales y las leyes sociales, como se explicará a detalle en el siguiente apartado. Ahora bien, <span>el Derecho depende de la norma, de la sanción que el Estado impone a los ciudadanos para la convivencia en sociedad, de aquí es donde surge el Derecho. Toda conducta humana debe ser regida por diferentes tipos de reglas de comportamiento, a las que se les llama norma. Las n







Flashcard 1428086197516

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#derecho #introduccion-al-derecho
Question

Las Normas jurídicas Son reglas de conducta expedidas por [...] para regular la pacífica convivencia de los seres humanos integrantes de una sociedad.

Answer
el poder público


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Las Normas jurídicas Son reglas de conducta expedidas por el poder público para regular la pacífica convivencia de los seres humanos integrantes de una sociedad y cuya observancia no está sujeta a la aceptación o no por parte del destinatario, ya que si és

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Normas y asi
equisito para ser bien recibido en su entorno y que si no son acatados traería como consecuencia el menosprecio o repudio del grupo social. Ejemplo: vestirse de etiqueta en una reunión de clase alta y comportarse con cortesía. <span>1.3.2.4 Normas jurídicas Son reglas de conducta expedidas por el poder público para regular la pacífica convivencia de los seres humanos integrantes de una sociedad y cuya observancia no está sujeta a la aceptación o no por parte del destinatario, ya que si éste no cumple, puede verse forzado a cumplirlas por medio de la coacción, haciendo uso de la fuerza que tiene el Estado. Ejemplo: la aplicación de una sanción por el Código Penal de determinada entidad si una persona mata a otro ser humano. 1.3.3 Características de las normas Las normas que se describieron en el subtema anterior se clasifican de acuerdo con su ámbito de aplicación en relación







Flashcard 1428087770380

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#clasificacion-de-las-normas #derecho #introduccion-al-derecho #normas-unilaterales
Question
Las normas unilaterales no prevén la existencia de [...] para [...] el [...] de las obligaciones contenidas en esa norma al destinatario
Answer
un sujeto facultado para exigir el cumplimiento


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l>Unilateralidad: Consiste en que las normas unilaterales no prevén la existencia de un sujeto facultado para exigir el cumplimiento de las obligaciones contenidas en esa norma al destinatario, es decir, o confieren facultades o imponen obligaciones, por ejemplo: un poder notarial, un convenio, un contrato<html>

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1.3.3.1 Clasificación de las normas
Unilateralidad: Consiste en que las normas unilaterales no prevén la existencia de un sujeto facultado para exigir el cumplimiento de las obligaciones contenidas en esa norma al destinatario, es decir, o confieren facultades o imponen obligaciones, por ejemplo: un poder notarial, un convenio, un contrato. Bilateralidad: Estas normas contemplan la existencia de un derecho que es desprendido de una obligación o viceversa y por lo tanto, la de un sujeto autorizado para e







Flashcard 1428251610380

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#introducción-al-derecho
Question
[...] es la obligación que toda persona tiene que cumplir para realizar un mandato, dicho en otras palabras, es el hacer o no hacer una determinada conducta, de lo contrario se aplicará una sanción.
Answer
El deber


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El deber es la obligación que toda persona tiene que cumplir para realizar un mandato, dicho en otras palabras, es el hacer o no hacer una determinada conducta, de lo contrario se aplicará una s

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Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning
#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-2-focus-is-the-starting-point-of-learning

The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones.

The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning.

As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we divide our attention, our focus switches back and forth between the two activities, also known as switch tasking.

The hippocampus loses vital pieces of information for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered.

Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information.

Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help.

All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 minutes of information followed by a processing activity, such as a dyad discussion, a period of reflection, an experiential activity, or even a break.

I can then string these mini-modules together into a longer session, although I rarely go longer than a half-day because of what I have learned about the brain. Since I have adopted this approach, I have seen a real increase in the effectiveness of learning events in terms of comprehension, retention, and ultimately behavior change.

Learning is not the only activity that benefits from focus. Daniel Goleman's latest book, Focus: The Hidden Ingredient in Excellence, details the positive impact focusing has on leadership, decision making, and creativity.

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Unknown title
r learning products. The brain structures that are involved in learning include the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the basal ganglia. To design the best learning experiences, we need to understand and respect the neuroscience of learning. <span>Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning. As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we divide our attention, our focus switches back and forth between the two activities, also known as switch tasking. The hippocampus loses vital pieces of information for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered. Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information. Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help. All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 min




Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals
#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals

One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run.

For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain.

Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves.

This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result.

Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix.

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Unknown title
ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th




Flashcard 1431638510860

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#cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #microeconomics #reading-14-demand-and-supply-analysis-consumer-demand #section-3-utility-theory #study-session-4
Question
The indifference curve is drawn to be convex when viewed from the origin. This indicates that willingness to [...] the [...] and the [...] the bundle contains.

(Bread and Wine)
Answer
give up wine to obtain a bread diminishes

more bread and the less wine


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Its curvature tells us something about the strength of his willingness to trade off one good for the other. The indifference curve is drawn to be convex when viewed from the origin. This indicates that the willingness to give up wine to obtain a little more bread diminishes the more bread and the less wine the bundle contains.

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3. UTILITY THEORY: MODELING PREFERENCES AND TASTES
d bread. Its negative slope simply represents that both wine and bread are seen as “good” to this consumer; in order to maintain indifference, a decrease in the quantity of wine must be compensated for by an increase in the quantity of bread. <span>Its curvature tells us something about the strength of his willingness to trade off one good for the other. The indifference curve in Exhibit 2 is characteristically drawn to be convex when viewed from the origin. This indicates that the willingness to give up wine to obtain a little more bread diminishes the more bread and the less wine the bundle contains. We capture this willingness to give up one good to obtain a little more of the other in the phrase marginal rate of substitution of bread for wine, MRS BW . The MRS BW i







Flashcard 1432389815564

Tags
#conjugation #italian #italian-grammar
Question
(noi) andremo
Answer
we will go


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This refers to the way in which verb forms change according to the person, tense or mood: (io) vado ‘I go’; (noi) andremo ‘we will go’; le ragazze sono andate ‘the girls went’; voleva che io andassi a casa sua ‘he wanted me to go to his house’; etc. The word conjugation is also used to mean the regular patterns of ver

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Flashcard 1432999824652

Tags
#aristotle #five-intelectual-virtues #trivium
Question

Aristotle analyzed virtues into moral and intellectual virtues

  • Theoretical
    • [...]
    • [...]
    • Nous – reason
Answer
Sophia – wisdom

Episteme – scientific knowledge, empirical knowledge


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r Analytics and Nicomachean Ethics he identified five intellectual virtues as the five ways the soul arrives at truth by affirmation or denial. These are then separated into three classes: Theoretical Sophia – wisdom <span>Episteme – scientific knowledge, empirical knowledge Nous – reason Practical Phronesis – practical wisdom/prudence Productive Techne – craft knowledge, art, skill Subjacent intellectual v

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Intellectual virtue - Wikipedia
ct thinking. They include: a sense of justice, perseverance, empathy, integrity, intellectual courage, confidence in reason, and autonomy. Contents [hide] 1 Aristotle 2 See also 3 References 4 External links Aristotle[edit] <span>Aristotle analyzed virtues into moral and intellectual virtues (or dianoetic virtues, from the Greek aretai dianoetikai). In the Posterior Analytics and Nicomachean Ethics he identified five intellectual virtues as the five ways the soul arrives at truth by affirmation or denial. These are then separated into three classes: Theoretical Sophia – wisdom Episteme – scientific knowledge, empirical knowledge Nous – reason Practical Phronesis – practical wisdom/prudence Productive Techne – craft knowledge, art, skill Subjacent intellectual virtues in Aristotle: Euboulia – deliberating well, deliberative excellence; thinking properly about the right end. Sunesis – understanding, sagacity, astuteness, consciousness of why something is as it is. For example, the understanding you have of why a situation is as it is, prior to having phronesis. Gnomê – judgement and consideration; allowing us to make equitable or fair decisions. Deinotes – cleverness; the ability to carry out actions so as to achieve a goal. See also[edit] Critical thinking Epistemic virtue Intellectual dishonesty Paideia Virtue ethics References[edit] Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics Book VI R. M. Paul Critical thi







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Question
Notice first that the [...] are not the same. In the upper diagram, we represent the quantity of the other good, wine, whose price is being held constant, along with income. Hence, the budget constraints all have the same vertical intercept.
Answer
vertical axes


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Flashcard 1434920029452



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Question

For each tangent point in the upper diagram, there is a [...] , tracing out the demand curve for bread.

Answer
corresponding point in the lower diagram


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Flashcard 1434939952396



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#6-revisiting-demand-function #cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #has-images #microeconomics #reading-14-demand-and-supply-analysis-consumer-demand #study-session-4
Question
What’s left of his response must be due to the [...] effect. So, we say that the [...] effect is shown by the move from point a to point b.

If his [...] were then restored, the resulting movement from point b to point c must be the [...]
Answer
substitution

substitution

income reduction

income effect.


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Substitution effect and income effect
reduction. If the income reduction is just sufficient to leave him no better or morse than before the price change, we have removed the real income effect of the decrease in price. What’s left of his response must be due to the <span>substitution effect . So, we say that the substitution effect is shown by the move from point a to point b. If his income reduction were then restored, the resulting movement from point b to point







Flashcard 1435048480012



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#cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #has-images #microeconomics #reading-13-demand-and-supply-analysis-introduction #study-session-4
Question


The total expenditure by buyers becomes the [...] to sellers in a market.

Answer
total revenue


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Exhibit 22. Elasticity and Total Expenditure
d>it does not matter whether we are dealing with the demand curve of an individual consumer, the demand curve of the market, or the demand curve facing any given seller. The total expenditure by buyers becomes the total revenue to sellers in a market. If demand is elastic, a fall in price will result in an increase in total revenue as a whole, and if demand is inelastic, a fall in price will result







Flashcard 1435050839308



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#cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #has-images #microeconomics #reading-13-demand-and-supply-analysis-introduction #study-session-4
Question
If demand is elastic, a fall in price will result in [...] revenue as a whole, and if demand is inelastic, a fall in price will result in a [...] revenue.

Answer
an increase in total

decrease in total


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Exhibit 22. Elasticity and Total Expenditure
onsumer, the demand curve of the market, or the demand curve facing any given seller. The total expenditure by buyers becomes the total revenue to sellers in a market. If demand is elastic, a fall in price will result in <span>an increase in total revenue as a whole, and if demand is inelastic, a fall in price will result in a decrease in total revenue. Clearly, if the demand faced by any given seller were inelastic at







Flashcard 1435053198604

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#cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #microeconomics #reading-13-demand-and-supply-analysis-introduction #study-session-4 #summary
Question
The relationship among own-price elasticity of demand, changes in price, and changes in total expenditure is as follows:

If demand is elastic, a reduction in price results in an
[...];

if demand is inelastic, a reduction in price results in
[...] ;

if demand is unitary elastic, a change in price
[...]
Answer
increase in total expenditure

a decrease in total expenditure

leaves total expenditure unchanged.


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The relationship among own-price elasticity of demand, changes in price, and changes in total expenditure is as follows: If demand is elastic, a reduction in price results in an increase in total expenditure; if demand is inelastic, a reduction in price results in a decrease in total expenditure; if demand is unitary elastic, a change in price leaves total expenditure unchanged.</spa

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SUMMARY
ood causes an increase in demand for the other good—are called complements. Goods with positive cross-price elasticity of demand—a drop in the price of one good causes a decrease in demand for the other—are called substitutes. <span>The relationship among own-price elasticity of demand, changes in price, and changes in total expenditure is as follows: If demand is elastic, a reduction in price results in an increase in total expenditure; if demand is inelastic, a reduction in price results in a decrease in total expenditure; if demand is unitary elastic, a change in price leaves total expenditure unchanged. <span><body><html>







Flashcard 1435071810828

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#cfa-level #economics #microeconomics #reading-13-demand-and-supply-analysis-introduction #study-session-4
Question
economics is the study of [...] , [...] , and [...]
Answer
production

distribution

consumption


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economics is the study of production, distribution, and consumption

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1. INTRODUCTION
In a general sense, economics is the study of production, distribution, and consumption and can be divided into two broad areas of study: macroeconomics and microeconomics. Macroeconomics deals with aggregate economic quantities, such as national output and national income. Macroeconomics has its roots in microeconomics , which deals with markets and d







Flashcard 1435073645836

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#cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #microeconomics #reading-13-demand-and-supply-analysis-introduction #study-session-4
Question
A good’s own price and other variables such as consumers’ incomes, their tastes and preferences, the prices of other goods that serve as substitutes or complements, etc. influence buying decision,.

Economists attempt to capture all of these influences in a relationship called [...] .
Answer
the demand function


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ence on that decision, such as consumers’ incomes, their tastes and preferences, the prices of other goods that serve as substitutes or complements, and so on. Economists attempt to capture all of these influences in a relationship called the <span>demand function .<span><body><html>

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3.1. The Demand Function and the Demand Curve
yers will choose to buy less of it, and as its price falls, they buy more. This is such a ubiquitous observation that it has come to be called the law of demand , although we shall see that it need not hold in all circumstances. <span>Although a good’s own price is important in determining consumers’ willingness to purchase it, other variables also have influence on that decision, such as consumers’ incomes, their tastes and preferences, the prices of other goods that serve as substitutes or complements, and so on. Economists attempt to capture all of these influences in a relationship called the demand function . (In general, a function is a relationship that assigns a unique value to a dependent variable for any given set of values of a group of independent variables.) We represent such a deman







Flashcard 1435076791564

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Question
For simplicity, we can assume that the only input in a production process is [...]
Answer
labor


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For simplicity, we can assume that the only input in a production process is labor that must be purchased in the labor market. The price of an hour of labor is the wage rate, or W. Hence, we can say that (for any given level of technology) the willingness to supply a

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3.3. The Supply Function and the Supply Curve
nomists refer to the “rules” that govern this transformation as the technology of production . Because producers have to purchase inputs in factor markets, the cost of production depends on both the technology and the price of those factors. <span>Clearly, willingness to supply is dependent on not only the price of a producer’s output, but also additionally on the prices (i.e., costs) of the inputs necessary to produce it. For simplicity, we can assume that the only input in a production process is labor that must be purchased in the labor market. The price of an hour of labor is the wage rate, or W. Hence, we can say that (for any given level of technology) the willingness to supply a good depends on the price of that good and the wage rate. This concept is captured in the following equation, which represents an individual seller’s supply function: Equation (7)  Qsx=f(Px,W,…) where Qsx







Flashcard 1435079150860

Tags
#cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #microeconomics #reading-13-demand-and-supply-analysis-introduction #study-session-4
Question
In summary, own-price elasticity of demand is likely to be greater (i.e., more sensitive) for items that have [...], occupy a large portion of the total budget, are seen to be optional instead of necessary, and [...]
Answer
many close substitutes

have longer adjustment times.


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In summary, own-price elasticity of demand is likely to be greater (i.e., more sensitive) for items that have many close substitutes, occupy a large portion of the total budget, are seen to be optional instead of necessary, and have longer adjustment times. Obviously, not all of these characteristics operate in the s

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4.1. Own-Price Elasticity of Demand
umers are much more likely to give up their Friday night restaurant meal than they are to cut back significantly on staples in their pantry. The more a good is seen as being necessary, the less elastic its demand is likely to be. <span>In summary, own-price elasticity of demand is likely to be greater (i.e., more sensitive) for items that have many close substitutes, occupy a large portion of the total budget, are seen to be optional instead of necessary, and have longer adjustment times. Obviously, not all of these characteristics operate in the same direction for all goods, so elasticity is likely to be a complex result of these and other characteristics. In the end, the actual elasticity of demand for a particular good turns out to be an empirical fact that can be learned only from careful observation and often, sophisticated statistical analysis. <span><body><html>







Flashcard 1435081510156

Tags
#cfa #cfa-level-1 #economics #microeconomics #reading-13-demand-and-supply-analysis-introduction #study-session-4
Question

The following equation represents an individual seller’s supply function:

[...]

Answer
Qsx=f(Px,W,…)


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This concept is captured in the following equation, which represents an individual seller’s supply function: Equation (7)  Qsx=f(Px,W,…) where Qsx is the quantity supplied of some good X, such as gasoline, P x is the price per unit of good X, and W is the wage rate of labor in, say, dollars per hour. It wou

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3.3. The Supply Function and the Supply Curve
that must be purchased in the labor market. The price of an hour of labor is the wage rate, or W. Hence, we can say that (for any given level of technology) the willingness to supply a good depends on the price of that good and the wage rate. <span>This concept is captured in the following equation, which represents an individual seller’s supply function: Equation (7)  Qsx=f(Px,W,…) where Qsx is the quantity supplied of some good X, such as gasoline, P x is the price per unit of good X, and W is the wage rate of labor in, say, dollars per hour. It would be read, “The quantity supplied of good X depends on (is a function of) the price of X (its “own” price), the wage rate paid to labor, etc.” Just as with the demand function, we can consider a simple hypothetical example of a seller’s supply function. As mentioned earlier, economists often will simplify their an







Flashcard 1435083869452

Tags
#rules-of-formulating-knowledge
Question
Rule no 5 [...] is a sentence with its parts missing and replaced by three dots.
Answer
Cloze deletion


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5.Cloze deletion is easy and effective
Cloze deletion is a sentence with its parts missing and replaced by three dots. Cloze deletion exercise is an exercise that uses cloze deletion to ask the student to fill in the gaps marked with the three dots. For example, Bill ...[name] was the second US presiden







Flashcard 1435088588044

Tags
#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-2-focus-is-the-starting-point-of-learning
Question

The [...] is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones.

Answer
hippocampus


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Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The h

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r learning products. The brain structures that are involved in learning include the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the basal ganglia. To design the best learning experiences, we need to understand and respect the neuroscience of learning. <span>Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning. As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we divide our attention, our focus switches back and forth between the two activities, also known as switch tasking. The hippocampus loses vital pieces of information for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered. Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information. Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help. All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 min







#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-2-focus-is-the-starting-point-of-learning
when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning.

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to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's <span>when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning. As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we

Original toplevel document

Unknown title
r learning products. The brain structures that are involved in learning include the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the basal ganglia. To design the best learning experiences, we need to understand and respect the neuroscience of learning. <span>Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning. As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we divide our attention, our focus switches back and forth between the two activities, also known as switch tasking. The hippocampus loses vital pieces of information for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered. Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information. Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help. All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 min




#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-2-focus-is-the-starting-point-of-learning
Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information.

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tion for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered. <span>Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information. Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many

Original toplevel document

Unknown title
r learning products. The brain structures that are involved in learning include the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the basal ganglia. To design the best learning experiences, we need to understand and respect the neuroscience of learning. <span>Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning. As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we divide our attention, our focus switches back and forth between the two activities, also known as switch tasking. The hippocampus loses vital pieces of information for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered. Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information. Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help. All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 min




Flashcard 1435097238796

Tags
#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-2-focus-is-the-starting-point-of-learning
Question
The hippocampus can only hold about [...] of information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory.
Answer
20 minutes


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Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information.

Original toplevel document

Unknown title
r learning products. The brain structures that are involved in learning include the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the basal ganglia. To design the best learning experiences, we need to understand and respect the neuroscience of learning. <span>Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning. As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we divide our attention, our focus switches back and forth between the two activities, also known as switch tasking. The hippocampus loses vital pieces of information for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered. Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information. Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help. All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 min







#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-2-focus-is-the-starting-point-of-learning
All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 minutes of information followed by a processing activity, such as a dyad discussion, a period of reflection, an experiential activity, or even a break.

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; Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help. <span>All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 minutes of information followed by a processing activity, such as a dyad discussion, a period of reflection, an experiential activity, or even a break. I can then string these mini-modules together into a longer session, although I rarely go longer than a half-day because of what I have learned about the brain. Since I hav

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Unknown title
r learning products. The brain structures that are involved in learning include the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the basal ganglia. To design the best learning experiences, we need to understand and respect the neuroscience of learning. <span>Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning. As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we divide our attention, our focus switches back and forth between the two activities, also known as switch tasking. The hippocampus loses vital pieces of information for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered. Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information. Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help. All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 min




#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-2-focus-is-the-starting-point-of-learning
Focus: The Hidden Ingredient in Excellence, details the positive impact focusing has on leadership, decision making, and creativity.

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, I have seen a real increase in the effectiveness of learning events in terms of comprehension, retention, and ultimately behavior change. Learning is not the only activity that benefits from focus. Daniel Goleman's latest book, <span>Focus: The Hidden Ingredient in Excellence, details the positive impact focusing has on leadership, decision making, and creativity. <span><body><html>

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Unknown title
r learning products. The brain structures that are involved in learning include the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the basal ganglia. To design the best learning experiences, we need to understand and respect the neuroscience of learning. <span>Tip #2: Focus is the starting point of learning The hippocampus is the part of the brain that takes in information and moves it to our memory. When it's damaged, people lose access to past memories and no longer can make new ones. The hippocampus acts like a recorder or data drive; like those devices, it has an "on" button. Physiologically, it's when our eyes and ears attune to something that causes the hippocampus to begin recording. Richard Davidson, from the University of Wisconsin, calls this "phase locking" and it's the starting point of all learning. As a result, we must design our learning environments to help people focus and we must bust the myth that you can multitask while learning. Research has proved that when we divide our attention, our focus switches back and forth between the two activities, also known as switch tasking. The hippocampus loses vital pieces of information for both of the things we were trying to attend to. I call this "Swiss tasking" because we end up with holes in the data the hippocampus was capturing and, therefore, holes in our learning that cannot be recovered. Here is the big shocker about the hippocampus: It can only hold so much information before it must be processed and pushed into short-term memory. Studies show that the maximum amount is about 20 minutes of information. Lecture-style sessions never have demonstrated good results for retention, and now we know why—it works against the brain's natural functioning. The good news is that many other learning activities can help. All the hippocampus needs is a few minutes of processing to push that data into short-term memory and it's ready again for more. I now build all my learning events in chunks of 15 min




#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals
One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run.

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One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha mo

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Unknown title
ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th




Flashcard 1435105365260

Tags
#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals
Question
One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through [...]—that makes learning memorable for the long run.
Answer
the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned


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One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run.

Original toplevel document

Unknown title
ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th







#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals
For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today. I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain.

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in science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. <span>For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity wi

Original toplevel document

Unknown title
ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th




Flashcard 1435108773132

Tags
#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals
Question
For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to [...], it eventually will get dumped from your brain.
Answer
retrieve that learning again


statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
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For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today. I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain.

Original toplevel document

Unknown title
ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th







#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals
Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy.

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learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. <span>Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and month

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ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th




#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals
Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals.

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val occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. <span>Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number

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Unknown title
ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th




Flashcard 1435113229580

Tags
#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-retrievals
Question
Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least [...].
Answer
three retrievals


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repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

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Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals.

Original toplevel document

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ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th







#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals
You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix.

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ree retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. <span>You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. <span><body><html>

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ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th




Flashcard 1435115851020

Tags
#six-tips-for-working-with-the-brain #tip-4-aim-for-three-retrievals
Question
You can certainly build many retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add [...]
Answer
sleep to the mix.


statusnot learnedmeasured difficulty37% [default]last interval [days]               
repetition number in this series0memorised on               scheduled repetition               
scheduled repetition interval               last repetition or drill

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You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix.

Original toplevel document

Unknown title
ult. This activates not only those specific memories, but also their individual schemas of change. When I pair this with hands-on activities for leading change effectively, the result is powerful and lasting. Advertisement <span>Tip #4: Aim for three retrievals One of the biggest insights from brain science has to do with how our memories are made. For conceptual learning, the evidence is clear that it's through the act of retrieval—having to recall something we have learned—that makes learning memorable for the long run. For example, I could teach you about neuroscience today (reading is certainly one of the ways we learn). I can activate your schemas and you might even have an "aha moment." But if you don't have to retrieve that learning again, it eventually will get dumped from your brain. Retrieval can occur through a variety of methods such as sharing what you learned with someone else, reflecting on how it relates to a past experience, doing an activity with hands-on application, quizzing yourself on your understanding, and a host of other learning activities. As instructional designers, we can easily build retrievals into our learning events and empower our learners to do that for themselves. This is what distinguishes great presenters from excellent instructors. Great presenters can create a feel-good experience that activates our schemas and that we thoroughly enjoy. And we will give those presenters or programs high ratings for satisfaction and raving reviews. But if no retrieval occurs, that learning will disappear in the following weeks and months. Sure, people will still say that they loved it, but they won't be able to remember much of what they learned, nor will their behavior change as a result. Research has shown that it is most effective to get to at least three retrievals. Memory studies have shown that three retrievals yield the best accuracy and retention. Although you can go on to more, the benefit seems to be better at three, so I focus on that number of retrievals in my own learning design. You can certainly build three retrievals into one learning event, but retention will be even more powerful if you add sleep to the mix. Tip #5: Build in sleep between learning It turns out that the sleeping brain plays a large role in how long-term memories are formed. While we sleep, the brain pushes information th







Flashcard 1435130793228

Tags
#function #matlab
Question
An alternative way to examine mathematical functions graphically is to use the following command:
Answer
>> ezplot(’tan(x)’)


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Flashcard 1435137346828

Tags
#citychef #munchery
Question
[...] in the U.S., [...] in Europe, and [...] in China, to name just a few, all connect Internet users with restaurants and their takeout menus.
Answer
GrubHub

Just Eat

Ele.me


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Munchery is one of dozens of technology startups around the world trying to solve the challenge of mealtime planning with the tap of an app. GrubHub in the U.S., Just Eat in Europe, and Ele.me in China, to name just a few, all connect Internet users with restaurants and their takeout menus.

Original toplevel document

How an immigrant motherfucker made munchery
d chief executive officer now. Four years ago he started Munchery, which delivers fully cooked meals to people’s homes, each day presenting an abundance of foods that stands in stark contrast to the deprivation of his early life. <span>Munchery is one of dozens of technology startups around the world trying to solve the challenge of mealtime planning with the tap of an app. GrubHub in the U.S., Just Eat in Europe, and Ele.me in China, to name just a few, all connect Internet users with restaurants and their takeout menus. Critics derisively call the proliferation of these businesses the “lazy food economy,” but Munchery is different. It cooks and delivers its own rela-tively healthy fare. Th







Flashcard 1435436453132

Question
How much time should GRE questions take?
Answer
Easy questions should take between 45 seconds and 1 minute. Medium questions should take between 1:00 – 2:00.


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If you are staring at a question and have been unable to devise a solution after [how long] , you should seriously consider moving on to the next question.

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ex dx = ex + C

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Table of Integrals
Integrals | Table Of) Power of x. x n dx = x (n+1) / (n+1) + C (n -1) Proof 1/x dx = ln|x| + C Exponential / Logarithmic <span>e x dx = e x + C Proof b x dx = b x / ln(b) + C Proof, Tip! ln(x) dx = x ln(x) - x + C Proof T




#has-images
xn dx = x(n+1) / (n+1) + C

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Table of Integrals
Table of Integrals (Math | Calculus | Integrals | Table Of) Power of x. <span>x n dx = x (n+1) / (n+1) + C (n -1) Proof 1/x dx = ln|x| + C Exponential / Logarithmic &#13