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#filosofia #platão #protagoras
Discussing poetry strikes me as no different from the second-rate drinking parties of the agora crowd. These people, largely uneducated and unable to entertain themselves over their wine by using their own voices to generate conversation, pay premium prices for d flute-girls and rely on the extraneous voice of the reed flute as background music for their parties. But when well-educated gentlemen drink together, you will not see girls playing the flute or the lyre or dancing, but a group that knows how to get together without these childish frivolities, convers- ing civilly no matter how heavily they are drinking.

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#filosofia #platão #protagoras
When a poet is brought up in a discussion, almost everyone has a different opinion about what he means, and they wind up arguing about something they can never finally decide. The best people avoid such discussions and rely on their own powers of speech to entertain 348 themselves and test each other. These people should be our models. We should put the poets aside and converse directly with each other, testing the truth and our own ideas.

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#filosofia #platão #protagoras
“Well, then, my good people: Since it has turned out that our salvation in life depends on the right choice of pleasures and pains, be they more b or fewer, greater or lesser, farther or nearer, doesn’t our salvation seem, first of all, to be measurement, which is the study of relative excess and deficiency and equality?”

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#platão #wiki

Protágoras foi um sofista da Grécia Antiga, célebre por cunhar a frase:

"O homem é a medida de todas as coisas, das coisas que são, enquanto são, das coisas que não são, enquanto não são."

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Protágoras – Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre
stas podem ser validamente confrontadas", a segunda é o seu complemento: a necessidade de "fortalecer o argumento fraco". Influenciou: Heráclito Foi influenciado: Platão, Jeremy Bentham, Friedrich Nietzsche, F.C.S. Schiller <span>Protágoras (em grego antigo: Πρωταγόρας; Abdera, c. 490 a.C. — Sicília, c. 415 a.C. [1] ) foi um sofista da Grécia Antiga, célebre por cunhar a frase: "O homem é a medida de todas as coisas, das coisas que são, enquanto são, das coisas que não são, enquanto não são." Tendo como base para isso o pensamento de Heráclito. Tal frase expressa bem o relativismo tanto dos Sofistas em geral quanto o relativismo do próprio Protágoras. Se o homem é a medida




Flashcard 1713929325836

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#platão #wiki
Question

[...] foi um sofista da Grécia Antiga, célebre por cunhar a frase:

"O homem é a medida de todas as coisas, das coisas que são, enquanto são, das coisas que não são, enquanto não são."

Answer
Protágoras


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Protágoras foi um sofista da Grécia Antiga, célebre por cunhar a frase: "O homem é a medida de todas as coisas, das coisas que são, enquanto são, das coisas que não são, enquanto

Original toplevel document

Protágoras – Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre
stas podem ser validamente confrontadas", a segunda é o seu complemento: a necessidade de "fortalecer o argumento fraco". Influenciou: Heráclito Foi influenciado: Platão, Jeremy Bentham, Friedrich Nietzsche, F.C.S. Schiller <span>Protágoras (em grego antigo: Πρωταγόρας; Abdera, c. 490 a.C. — Sicília, c. 415 a.C. [1] ) foi um sofista da Grécia Antiga, célebre por cunhar a frase: "O homem é a medida de todas as coisas, das coisas que são, enquanto são, das coisas que não são, enquanto não são." Tendo como base para isso o pensamento de Heráclito. Tal frase expressa bem o relativismo tanto dos Sofistas em geral quanto o relativismo do próprio Protágoras. Se o homem é a medida







#filosofia #platão
Protagoras is a dialogue by Plato. The main argument is between the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated Sophist, and Socrates. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to Protagoras while he is in town, and concerns the nature of Sophists, the unity and the teachability of virtue.

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Protagoras (dialogue) - Wikipedia
r The Chariot Related articles Commentaries The Academy in Athens Socratic problem Middle Platonism Neoplatonism and Christianity Allegorical interpretations of Plato Socratic fallacy [imagelink] Philosophy portal v t e <span>Protagoras (/proʊˈtæɡərəs/; Greek: Πρωταγόρας) is a dialogue by Plato. The traditional subtitle (which may or may not be Plato's) is "or the Sophists". The main argument is between the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated Sophist, and Socrates. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to Protagoras while he is in town, and concerns the nature of Sophists, the unity and the teachability of virtue. A total of twenty-one people are named as present. Contents [hide] 1 The characters 2 Summary 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Prodicus is wrestled out of bed 2.3 Protagoras' great spe




Flashcard 1713935093004

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#filosofia #platão
Question
[...] is a dialogue by Plato. The main argument is between the elderly [...] , a celebrated Sophist, and Socrates. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to [...] while he is in town, and concerns the nature of Sophists, the unity and the teachability of virtue.
Answer
Protagoras


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Protagoras is a dialogue by Plato. The main argument is between the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated Sophist, and Socrates. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to Protag

Original toplevel document

Protagoras (dialogue) - Wikipedia
r The Chariot Related articles Commentaries The Academy in Athens Socratic problem Middle Platonism Neoplatonism and Christianity Allegorical interpretations of Plato Socratic fallacy [imagelink] Philosophy portal v t e <span>Protagoras (/proʊˈtæɡərəs/; Greek: Πρωταγόρας) is a dialogue by Plato. The traditional subtitle (which may or may not be Plato's) is "or the Sophists". The main argument is between the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated Sophist, and Socrates. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to Protagoras while he is in town, and concerns the nature of Sophists, the unity and the teachability of virtue. A total of twenty-one people are named as present. Contents [hide] 1 The characters 2 Summary 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Prodicus is wrestled out of bed 2.3 Protagoras' great spe







Flashcard 1713937452300

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#filosofia #platão
Question
Protagoras is a dialogue by Plato. The main argument is between the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated Sophist, and Socrates. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to Protagoras while he is in town, and concerns the nature of Sophists, the unity and the teachability of [...]
Answer


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nt is between the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated Sophist, and Socrates. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to Protagoras while he is in town, and concerns the nature of Sophists, the unity and the teachability of <span>virtue.<span><body><html>

Original toplevel document

Protagoras (dialogue) - Wikipedia
r The Chariot Related articles Commentaries The Academy in Athens Socratic problem Middle Platonism Neoplatonism and Christianity Allegorical interpretations of Plato Socratic fallacy [imagelink] Philosophy portal v t e <span>Protagoras (/proʊˈtæɡərəs/; Greek: Πρωταγόρας) is a dialogue by Plato. The traditional subtitle (which may or may not be Plato's) is "or the Sophists". The main argument is between the elderly Protagoras, a celebrated Sophist, and Socrates. The discussion takes place at the home of Callias, who is host to Protagoras while he is in town, and concerns the nature of Sophists, the unity and the teachability of virtue. A total of twenty-one people are named as present. Contents [hide] 1 The characters 2 Summary 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Prodicus is wrestled out of bed 2.3 Protagoras' great spe







#filosofia #platão #wiki
While Socrates seems to have won the argument, he points to the fact that if all virtue is knowledge, it can in fact be taught. He draws the conclusion that to an observer he and Protagoras would seem as crazy, having argued at great lengths only to mutually exchanged positions with Socrates now believing that virtue can be taught and Protagoras that all virtues are one instead of his initial position (361a). Protagoras acknowledges Socrates a notable opponent in dispute while being much younger than he and predicts that he could become one of the wisest men alive.

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Protagoras (dialogue) - Wikipedia
A brave swimmer is one who knows how to swim better and therefore, in a way, all virtues are essentially knowledge and can be considered one and the same, more like parts of golden objects (as discussed above) rather than the parts of a face. <span>While Socrates seems to have won the argument, he points to the fact that if all virtue is knowledge, it can in fact be taught. He draws the conclusion that to an observer he and Protagoras would seem as crazy, having argued at great lengths only to mutually exchanged positions with Socrates now believing that virtue can be taught and Protagoras that all virtues are one instead of his initial position (361a). Protagoras acknowledges Socrates a notable opponent in dispute while being much younger than he and predicts that he could become one of the wisest men alive. Socrates departs for whatever business he claimed he had when he wanted to end the dialogue earlier. Notes[edit] Jump up ^ Bacon, Francis. Essays. Essay number 26, "Of Seemin




Flashcard 1713945054476

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#aórtica #básicos #conceptos #insuficiencia #regurgitación
Question
Insuficiencia Aórtica

Fisiopatología
Definición
Clínica
Estudio de elección

Answer
El aumento en el volumen de sangre regurgitada produce un aumento en el volumen tele diastólico en el VI y una elevación del estrés de la pared.

Es causada por enfermedad de las valvas o crecimiento de la raíz aórtica. Desarrollados= congénita (bicúspide) o dilatacíon de raíz Ao. En desarrollo= Cardiopatía Reumática

Presión de pulso amplia, impulso apical desplazado lateralmente e inferiormente siendo difuso e hiperdinámico. Soplo diastólico temprano (su ausencia no descarta). Angina de pecho>síncope de Esfuerzo>Insuficiencia Cardíaca

Ecocardiograma Doppler= mayor sensibilidad

Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of chronic aortic regurgitation in adults-Up to Date


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#language_greek
* and, which is regularly used to connect a string of sentences where in English we would avoid any connecting word at all. In English it would be considered very bad style to begin sentence after sentence with and, but in Greek it is totally natural and acceptable, δέ* is also translatable as but, but when so used it denotes only a slight contrast: ό

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#language_greek
Άχιλλεύο ην έν τη οκηντγ ό δέ Πάτροκλοο έφερεν οννον Achilles was in the tent but (or and) Patroclus was bringing wine. A

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#language_greek
βραδέακ; αλλά ταχέωο oi βαρβαροι ήμάο έδίωκον the barbarians were chasing us not slowly but quickly. Not

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#language_greek
γάρ* for, as, which introduces the reason for what goes before,

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#language_greek
ού μένομεν oi γάρ βάρβαροι rpac διώκουοιν we are not staying as the barbarians are chasing

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#language_greek
ούν* therefore, so, introduces the result of what goes before, ο

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#language_greek
οί βάρβαροι ήμάο διώκουαν ταχέακ: ούν τρέχομεν the barbarians are chasing us; therefore we are running quickly.

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#language_greek
ήμεΐο καί ϋμεΐο you and we

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#language_greek
to the 1st person, English is more polite). καί ... καί is used to express both ... and και ή 'Αφροδίτη και ό Aiovtfcoc both Aphrodite and Dionysos, and

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